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If You Could APPRENTICE with ONE CINEMATOGRAPHER Now...?


Tom Lowe
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Guest Glen Alexander
Let's see some !!!!!

 

No one here posts images of their film before its complete or even after.

 

From tests shots, VV crushes everything except 65mm for much less $$.

 

Anamorphic compression is lame in comparison.

 

You can have 35mm -3 or 4 perf film or digital bullshit, I'll take VV anyday, anytime.

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No one here posts images of their film before its complete or even after.

 

From tests shots, VV crushes everything except 65mm for much less $$.

 

Anamorphic compression is lame in comparison.

 

You can have 35mm -3 or 4 perf film or digital bullshit, I'll take VV anyday, anytime.

 

To say that you're completely original and have no influences seems like a very egotistical and ignorant claim. Even if you don't like to think so

you're unconsciously affected by films you've watched unless you've never watched any in your life or actually make an effort to do something completely unlike from what you've seen (ie. leaving the lens cap on)

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hi all I'm new to the group, but I'd go for Matthew Libatique first( the fountain), wally pfister (The prestige), mauro fiore (memoirs of geisha), roger deakins (everything cowen brothers) , Robert Elswit and Jordan Cronenweth (if he were alive, because blade runner was just awsome), I also like emanual lubezki work on children of men and sleepy hollow. oh and Larry Fong because he really knows how to do a green sceen/virual set justice :rolleyes: i guess thats a lot of people but if i could follow each of them around for a few months i think i'd learn a lot.

 

Peace and filmmaking

 

Devindra S.

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hi all I'm new to the group, but I'd go for Matthew Libatique first( the fountain), wally pfister (The prestige), mauro fiore (memoirs of geisha), roger deakins (everything cowen brothers) , Robert Elswit and Jordan Cronenweth (if he were alive, because blade runner was just awsome), I also like emanual lubezki work on children of men and sleepy hollow. oh and Larry Fong because he really knows how to do a green sceen/virual set justice :rolleyes: i guess thats a lot of people but if i could follow each of them around for a few months i think i'd learn a lot.

 

Peace and filmmaking

 

Devindra S.

 

oops that was dione beebe that did memoirs of a geisha, Mauro Fiore did training day, get carter and smoking aces all of which i though rocked also christopher doyle would be cool i though hero looked awsome

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  • 4 weeks later...

Bob Richardson ASC - Kill Bill Vol. 1 & Vol 2. Think about how many different looks he does within in that movie. The O-Ren Ishi scene, Pei Mei scene, all of it, the control and confidence he has with his stocks and lighting is incredible.

Conrad Hall ASC - Cool Hand Luke changed my world when I saw it in high school. Road to Perdition is a true testament to his career, Sam Mendes said a D.I. would ruin his photography for that picture.

Guillermo Navarro ASC, AMC - His work in Pan's, both Hellboy's, his ability to create those worlds with lighting is amazing.

Amy Vincent ASC - Hustle & Flow and Black Snake Moan look incredible, her colors are amazing.

Henri Decae - 400 Blows, kept me glued to the screen the first time I saw it.

Emmanuel Lubezki ASC, AMC - Sleepy Hollow, Lemmy Snickets, and Children of Men. All different, all amazing.

Gordon Willis ASC - The Godfather is the sole reason I went to film school.

Harris Savides ASC - The Yards, the scene in the train yard and when the trains go by it cuts out all the light and all you can see is the actors eye light. Might be just eye light but the visual of that is astounding. He is a risk taker and I respect that.

Robert Elswit ASC - I love all the P.T. Anderson work and how they avoid D.I. Photochemically finished films have a special place in my heart.

 

By the way, I have no problems with D.I. I think it has its place and time where it is needed. I just personally love films that are photochemically finished. I develop my own still film so it's something I've grown to love.

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David Mullen- only been here a short while and have learned a lot from him.

Soopum Sohn- My teacher. Amazing to work with him, he has a vast knowledge of film and is excellent to work with

Rodger Deakins- Why I wanted to become a Cinematographer

Cesar Chalone- Every frame is stunning

Jurgen Juges- (Code Uknown, Funny Games) Brilliant long shots, really can tell a story with just a picture

Floria Sigismondi- She has an eye for the beautiful even if it's ugly

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  • 3 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

well no offense to the man or the people here who listed him, but it doesn't look like Gordon Willis is working too much anymore. I would enjoy working with:

Deakins

Elswit

Khondji ( i just worked with him on a Dior spot with Charlize Theron and it looked amazing)

Storaro

Lubezki

Prieto

Richardson

Lance Accord

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For me, it would be Vittorio Storaro. I've heard more people I respect as cinematographers say that they either learned their craft from him or that he was their model career-wise, so I'd want to learn from him. He may have not shot many films recently that get much play stateside, but looking back on his entire catalog, he's shot some of the most beautiful films in history. Just to be able to sit in a room with him would probably open my mind greatly, and would probably open a few doors as well.

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I had no idea Roger Deakins was so beloved. But yeah, if I could I would with Deakins. Wall-E has a feature documenting the Pixar animators getting a lighting lesson from Deakins. He spends a couple of hours trying to properly light this fellow on a set, but then something catches his eye. Deakins asks the camera op to swing around to a Grip. The camera turns and you see the Grip, lit perfectly by all the crap Deakins strung up to light the other guy with. That was a cool moment.

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  • 2 weeks later...
For me, it would be Vittorio Storaro. I've heard more people I respect as cinematographers say that they either learned their craft from him or that he was their model career-wise, so I'd want to learn from him.

 

I've been to the ASC Awards I'm guessing about 12 times starting with the 2nd ceremony. I've been lucky enough to meet the greatest cinematographers in the world and I have gotten to sit down and talk with, eat dinner with, and have drinks with many of them. Vittorio is one of the kindest and most sincere of them all. I said to him, "Vittorio, I think you are the greatest." He said, "No, everyone has something to contribute, even you." I'll never forget that as long as I live.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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