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Shooting with kodak 500T Low light


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Hey guys, I shot this using vision3 500T in my 35mm SLR camera. It was a rehearsal for a scene. Im not the DP for this project btw. But just wanted to practice my skills. All I had was the TTL metering of my camera (reflective metering).

 

I was having trouble getting a fast enough shutter speed due to the lack of light. the 500T can shoot at EI 1600, matter fact this shot was probably just that. Unfortunately the slow shutter speed and wide apertures I was forced to use led to a whole bunch of blurry unusable shots.

 

How does this relate or differ from using an actual motion picture camera? I would imagine that hand held shots in movies are only achievable in well lit scenes???

 

BTW below is a better shot because I had more light coming in from the windows.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/91909492@N06/8690001967/" title="rehearsal by frametheory, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7043/8690001967_140bc808b7_z.jpg" width="640" height="360" alt="rehearsal"></a>
Edited by Alejandro Gonzalez
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On a film camera you don't change your shutter speed, you're generally at or near 1/48th of a second for 24fps shooting. and 500T is more than enough for that in most situations. However, we are often shooting with T1.3 lenses. How slow is your lens?

Also, in motion; there is less of a problem with blurring of the image, as in truth all the images on film blur. It's part of the "film look," that specific motion blur you get @ 24fps with a 180 degree shutter. But in motion you don't notice it nearly as much as you do in a still.

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8690001967_140bc808b7_z.jpg

 

 

 

 

Also if that is the shot you are referring to, I don't see much of an issue. Looks like a film frame to me.

I got it by right clicking the photo on flickr and copying the "target location," and then in the full reply I just clicked on insert image and pasted it.

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Aye; when you're on (motion) film, you really adjust aperture much more so than shutter speed.

For that image, it looks ok; but you'd've benefited if lighting it perhaps by back lighting those two with something and then using a white card to bound some back for fill. The guy looks good, on his head and all; but I'd've hit them with a rim, and then used a white card to bring it back into their faces.

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Just saw your reel, great stuff man. yeah i agree. and plus the backlight would have helped me with the exposure. the day of the shoot when they have everything setup i will see if i can sneak some shots in without bothering folks. im the story artist for this project.

 

By white card do you mean white reflector as used in photography?

Edited by Alejandro Gonzalez
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Thanks Alejandro; I'm glad you liked the reel.

You could certainly use a white-reflector from stills photography. Normally I use stuff called Foam Core which you can pick up at any arts shop. There's also Show-Card which is 1 side white, 1 side black, great to have around.

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