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How to light this? (light diagram)


Francesco Andreoli
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Hi everybody,

 

sorry for my bad english but I'm italian guy, I hope you understand.

I have some questions on these two reference

I have an my idea but I would to be sure and I ask for your experience.

 

Frame 01

post-68854-0-49548600-1457295882_thumb.jpg

 

What kind and how many lights should I use for this shot?

How I can do that "cyan effect" on background?

What is the best white balance setting in camera?

 

Frame 02

post-68854-0-52015100-1457296591_thumb.jpg

 

How many lights should I use for this shot?

In your opinion, there is a "real flare" or it is made in post-production?

 

Thanks a lot

F.

 

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Hard to say how many lights. In the first frame, it appears that there is either a large HMI or actual sunlight coming through the back window on camera right. It is blue because the camera is white balanced closer to 3200K. Probably around 3800K or so. The green tint was probably added in grading, but you could also dial in green tint in-camera if you wanted to do it on set.

 

There could be additional daylight sources outside the frosted back windows, or that could be ambient daylight. There appears to be a smaller hard daylight source used as an edge light on the subject up high on camera right. You can see the beam in the smoke.

 

In the foreground, there is a soft tungsten key on camera right and possibly a spottier tungsten source directly over the table to emulate the table bounce from the practical lamp on the table. And then of course the tungsten practical itself. I don't think the practical itself is actually lighting the table because of the way it is angled.

 

In the second frame, I'm pretty sure it is simply backlit by one of the windows and a bit from the tungsten practical lamp. Because the bulb is so reflective, you would see any light sources in the surface of the glass if something else was used. The flare appears to be real, this is shot with anamorphic lenses which tend to flare much easier than modern spherical lenses. We call this type of flare 'veiling glare.'

 

The source could be a small tungsten source from down low and off to camera right. I think it is something like a spotted Dedo aimed at the lens from far back because there is no reflection of the source in the bulb, as there would be for something closer to the camera.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The source could be a small tungsten source from down low and off to camera right. I think it is something like a spotted Dedo aimed at the lens from far back because there is no reflection of the source in the bulb, as there would be for something closer to the camera.

 

Could it not be that the reflection is in fact the tungsten light source, but is stretched out by the anamorphic lens? The intensity of the spectacular highlight suggests that the light source is fairly large, but at a distance away from the bulb. If the light source was aimed directly at the camera, it should appear differently.

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