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Movies Ruined By digital


fatih yıkar
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Fatih .. I have the answer.. Choose life.. don't worry about pixel peeking.. get out of your bedroom.. make you're own films.. grade them anyway you want.. concentrate on scripts and acting.. get drunk at the wrap party.. go to the cinema to "see" a film.. not the grade.. if its a film good you won't even notice it.. choose life ..son.. choose life..

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That's right, Fatih, the problems of film prints are these days exaggerated. I easily remember decades of seeing 35mm film projection, big blockbuster films that had already been showing several times a day, for several weeks, and the look of the prints was absolutely fine. Never once witnessed a frame burnout or anything major happen, and I was an avid cinema goer. Worst thing that ever happened was (I think) a projector broke down and the manager came out 'on stage' and apologised and chatted with us for a bit while the projectionist frantically made the repairs. I seem to recall she had us all laughing with her wit. We gave her strong applause when the curtains opened again and the film was ready to show. Occasionally seem to recall a film showing would start to judder momentarily, probably torn sprockets, but this righted itself in about a second or less. Yes, some vertical lines started to appear after a few weeks of daily showings, dust, and maybe some popping sounds in the soundtrack, but personally I loved all of that stuff. It was just the movies. As I said, of many years of enjoying film prints at the cinema I never once experienced a major problem. There was never a showing I went to that was cancelled because a print became unwatchable. I seem to recall that the Star Wars films, shown on cinemascope 35mm prints, would run several times a day for many weeks, all the one print. They went fine. Even at the end of a run, a film was still very watchable.

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Yes, some vertical lines started to appear after a few weeks of daily showings, dust, and maybe some popping sounds in the soundtrack, but personally I loved all of that stuff. It was just the movies.

 

I'm going to explain this in summary: we used to go to the movies, now we all just watch big TVs. Going to the movies used to be its own experience. Now it's like watching TV.

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I'm going to explain this in summary: we used to go to the movies, now we all just watch big TVs. Going to the movies used to be its own experience. Now it's like watching TV.

 

 

Well not really.. you leave the house.. you see other people .. you get wear your best regalia .. its a social activity .. but you don't do it every day.. who can afford it, except for sound recordists .. and the other days you can watch, at least these days .. fantastic tv content.. its better than it has ever been.. on a nice big tv.. whats not to love.. best of both worlds.. all this gnashing of teeth about how the world was better with hand cranked cameras and typhoid .. relax.. life is hard and then you die.. lets worry about The Orange twat tweeting facist propaganda

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Robin, I don't know who you're talking about. I'm an adult and don't worry about birds outside tweeting or whatever. Orange? Is that an attack on Zippy from RAINBOW? My daughter still hasn't figured out what Zippy is and she's smarter than me. Maybe it's getting light bounces off of Rod, Jane and Freddy's tans.

 

You know, it's odd now that I think about it, I went and watched AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON when it came out and paid $1.25 for my ticket which I'm sure I still have somewhere in storage. That was in 1981 when the FILM prints were made on FILM. It opened in about 2000 theatres which meant that 2000 35mm prints had to be pulled at about $2000 each or $4,000,000.00 just for prints.

 

Four million dollars just for prints and the movie cost $1.25 to watch.

 

Now they deliver the VIDEO files digitally to the VIDEO projectors and it costs $12.50 to watch the stuff. It costs ten times MORE and it looks ten times worse. And it is much easier for pirates to copy the thing.

 

I hope the digital fad ends soon.

Edited by Samuel Berger
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Well yes everything was cheaper in 1981.. inflation Im afraid..cinema was about $3-5 in London.. but an average house was also about $60,000.. now its close $1m in nearly all of London.. in that respect .. and considering the cost to actually make the product.. ie a film.. the tent poles being 100,s of millions now.. compared to even 10 million being a huge budget in 1981.The price has actually gone down a lot when you consider god know what percent inflation from then to now..

 

Although Im sure your right.. this digital thing is a passing phase .. as is the color green.. be gone both of them I say ..

 

PS No not Zippy.. a far more dangerous Clown Im afraid ..

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post-69480-0-56462300-1512044712_thumb.png

 

Like the Charles said there, going a movie theater is an Experience. In old times many people just go to theater for that experience, not for one particularly chosen movie, they go,select randomly a movie and watch it.

Inflation is main reason but why the ticket prices not drop after digital revolution? Dcp files more cheaper than $1500 film prints

 

Even though digital projection is better than film projection, in my opinion theater should run film prints. You have to give me something that i can't get at home. Now 60 inches tv's are really cheaper and home theater projectors gives really beautiful images at 130 inches and prices getting drop every year.

While the ticket prices are rising in theaters and now movie theaters has 10 or 15 small screen instead of one giant, big screen.

 

Btw i always wonder how it looks MaxiVision 24 or 48 system, so many time Roger Ebert praise that. There are good articles about this subject...

https://www.rogerebert.com/rogers-journal/thats-not-the-imax-i-grew-up-with

https://www.rogerebert.com/scanners/digital-dilemmas-you-want-pixels-with-that

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Well yes everything was cheaper in 1981.. inflation Im afraid..cinema was about $3-5 in London.. but an average house was also about $60,000.. now its close $1m in nearly all of London.. in that respect .. and considering the cost to actually make the product.. ie a film.. the tent poles being 100,s of millions now.. compared to even 10 million being a huge budget in 1981.The price has actually gone down a lot when you consider god know what percent inflation from then to now..

 

Although Im sure your right.. this digital thing is a passing phase .. as is the color green.. be gone both of them I say ..

 

PS No not Zippy.. a far more dangerous Clown Im afraid ..

 

I see some logical fallacies there, you know. And how odd that houses are so expensive in the caliphate of London...perhaps because the Saudis are buying up real state in droves. I saw that on the news today.

When they take over, do suppose you'll see them hurling homosexuals off the top of the tower of London? We shall see...Hopefully Brexit will place a solid wedge between them and their silly get-rich-quick schemes.

 

It's not the colour green that needs to go, it's orange and teal grading. I think in about 20 years people will avoid it like the plague in order to not appear "vintage".

 

Zippy is not to be mocked, but I'm sure Bungle is scarier. Both were shot on video though, except exteriors. No idea what it was, with the ITV and the BBC always switching from videotape to 16mm everytime someone takes a gander outdoors and back to video again when they walk in!

 

Take care, and while in Japan, please don't get kidnapped by the Kim guy to shoot a Godzilla film, because if you suggest to them you'll do it digitally, they might hold you there forever.

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Does anyone seriously think that if an image is greenish, its because it was shot digitally instead of on film???

 

Regular green or Sony green? Because if it's Sony green then somebody tried to get a usable image with a Sony. By golly by jingo by crikey, don't do that! ;-)

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But do any of you know about Larry who used to sit on the box on Broadway and 50th St? He is "Scumbag"! The movie "Born to Win" is about him. His position was just 50 feet down from the Brill Building at 1619 Broadway. They all did HAIR at the Biltmore on 47th St. and that's how come David Scott Milton saw Larry frequently enough to have been inspired to write the movie.

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Larry was, I believe, a private valet for someone in the industry who fired him when he got married and this set him off. Jerry Leiber's secretary Faith told me this in 1989 when I asked her if she knew anything about him. And don't believe all you see in print, though I wouldn't mind being 27 again. Oh, and there was also a Zum Zum on Broadway.

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My biggest concern is the closing of labs. By all means, if you love film, don't stand idly by as it dies...shoot film. While you can, because if you just simply stand on that fence and think that "story is all that matters" one day there will be no fence, they will make the choice for you and for all future generations to come.

 

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