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Ben Brahem Ziryab

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About Ben Brahem Ziryab

  • Rank

  • Birthday 10/27/1992

Profile Information

  • Occupation
    Cinematographer
  • Location
    Los Angeles

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  • Website URL
    http://www.benziryab.com

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  1. FS: 110mm T2 and 50mm T2.8 Hasselblad / Zeiss. Fully rehoused for large format digital cinematography. The base glass is Zeiss / Hasselblad CFE FLE (with floating lens elements). The base glass elements were handpicked to get the highest performing base glass. They use an interchangeable mount system to switch between Hasselblad V and PL mount. They can be used with cinema cameras that support PL mount or LPL mount (we have the adapters) as well as Hasselblad 500 CM, 2000, H3D, H4D, H5D, etc. They offer sharp optics and a 14 blade circular iris for attractive creamy bokeh. Their large 82mm image circle will cover camera’s all the way up to the ALEXA 65. A future proof investment as the industry goes towards larger and larger sensors. 300 degrees of focus rotation. Lenses marked in Feet. Price $5697 or Best Offer per lens.
  2. FS: 110mm T2 and 50mm T2.8 Hasselblad / Zeiss. Fully rehoused for large format digital cinematography. The base glass is Zeiss / Hasselblad CFE FLE (with floating lens elements). The base glass elements were handpicked to get the highest performing base glass. They use an interchangeable mount system to switch between Hasselblad V and PL mount. They can be used with cinema cameras that support PL mount or LPL mount (we have the adapters) as well as Hasselblad 500 CM, 2000, H3D, H4D, H5D, etc. They offer sharp optics and a 14 blade circular iris for attractive creamy bokeh. Their large 82mm image circle will cover camera’s all the way up to the ALEXA 65. A future proof investment as the industry goes towards larger and larger sensors. 300 degrees of focus rotation. Lenses marked in Feet. Price $5997 or Best Offer per lens.
  3. I’m selling 10 of my Arri 535B 1000’ mags. They are in excellent condition. You can buy them individually or all together. They can be picked up in LA or I can ship to all U.S. states and most countries. Price is negotiable.
  4. Has anyone here seen it? I thought it was incredible in every aspect. How was it not nominated for an Academy Award for Best Editing and Best Cinematography?
  5. As most of us here, I primarily shoot with digital cameras. Occasionally I get a chance to shoot a project on film. One thing I still love about film is the traditional film print. The quality of the image is intimate and naturalistic. There is also a distinct quality to the light on the screen, a kind of "3D effect", highlights glow and the blacks are deeper than most digital projectors (with the exception of laser). Colors can be truly gorgeous. For instance, I watched "The Love Witch" and I loved how colors popped off the screen. I know how to achieve this with traditional printing (e.g. high printer lights, exposing a dense negative, costume design etc.) However, in most cases, even when I get to shoot on film, I won't be finishising on film. The reasons are obvious: cost, titles, VFX, color grading limitations, most festivals accept only DCP's, general audience can't tell the difference, it doesn't sell more tickets or make the story better, etc. So if I shoot on film but finish digitally, what are some ways to emulate the look of a traditional print? One idea I have, but never tried, is to print from the camera negative, then digitally scan that. In other words, scan the print instead of the negative.
  6. Has anyone seen it yet?
  7. Congrats on the award David and on being on that list. I looked at the stills from the Blu-ray review you posted and they look different from the print that I saw at the Cinefamily. The print was much richer in color saturation and contrast. It had a kind of velvety quality to it. Do you know if it was struck directly from the OCN?
  8. I watched the film at the Cinefamily and I thought it looked terrific. I didn't get a chance to watch it at the Aero last week and I have no frame of reference. I did think that the print of the movie looked completely different than the stills you've been posting here as well as the blu ray grabs. The print that I saw was extremely rich in color and tonality with high contrast and very saturated colors which I love.
  9. Hello all, There is something interesting happening with the soft lighting on Leo's face. It looks like a large soft source close to camera as the light falls off quickly (and perhaps some negative fill), but there is a bit of a highlight on Leo's face. Could it be a book light, and in between the two frames, a small fresnel light pointing directly towards Leo?
  10. What about 35mm? Is the difference negligible? Interesting enough I once pushed 5213 two stops (rated at asa 500) and brought it back to normal in the lab. The print looked great and not grainy at all. Then I did a 2K transfer on a Spirit and it looked quite grainy and the black were a bit milky.
  11. Hello all, Looking at the HD trailer of "Transcendence" and Wally Pfister's work on “The Dark Knight Rises” I noticed that the colors and contrast really pop (click link below). I wonder how this was done knowing that those films were graded traditionally and the HD transfer was done from an IP. Sure you can overexpose by 2/3 stop and print at higher printer lights, use the lighting and art direction etc, but judging from the trailer and blu-ray, it looks more like a DI. How do you think they pushed the saturation and contrast?
  12. Hello all, Would any of you know if shooting 5213 inside over 5219 is worth the improvement in grain and sharpness when contact printed? Shooting 35mm anamorphic and contact printing directly from OCN to create anamorphic showprints (as well as a 4K scan for DCP). Thank you. Ben
  13. Has anybody watched this movie in an IMAX theatre yet? I just watched it last week at the California Science Center in Los Angeles (in 15/70mm).
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