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Kim Bolan

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About Kim Bolan

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  • Occupation
    Cinematographer
  • Location
    Seattle
  • My Gear
    Panasonic, Canon
  1. The MSDS for ADJ Haze/G FOG Mist Liquid indicates the fluid's health hazard as - "INHALATION NO SIGNIFICANT HEALTH HAZARDS IDENTIFIED". This product is a low fire hazard (Flash Point > 3,400 F). The ability to have on/off control without preheating of the product combined with no respiratory hazards and a very high flash point I think makes an ideal solution. The MSDS download is available at www.adj.com/hazeg
  2. Walnut shell dust is an interesting material. While this would not be toxic I would be concerned with the inhalation hazard. The need for a respirator or at least a dust mask might be required.
  3. Thank you all for the very rapid response to my question. I reviewed the MSDS for Rosco Delta Haze Fluid and it appears to be the least invasive product for producing haze. The HMIS Rating is 1 – slight hazard so I would suspect that someone with respiratory issues or who are respiratory sensitive could be adversely effected. The more confined area would of course increase the sensitivity. Thank you, Mr. Connolly, for the suggestion of flagging the use of haze producing materials on the call sheet. I would also have the MSDS available. Consistency of the haze is also an issue and a machine such as the Rosco V-Hazer Fog Machine might be the best solution. Also, the suggestion for using “sheets of poly board to even the haze out.” That is something I had not originally considered and appreciate the suggestion. Thank you, Mr. Lettinen, for pointing out the use of “flammable powder in air = explosion hazard” and the use of “salt crystals (pure NaCl dust)”. Salt crystals are a product I had not considered and will further research. Thank you, Mr. Cazacu, for the suggestion of using “Leko or Joker Bug”.
  4. In the film "Double Indemnity" Fed MacMurray is standing in the home of Barbara Stanwyck. Strong shafts of light are beautifully streaming down. I was told that John Seitz used metal filings (Possibly aluminum) to create that effect. This would not appear to be safe for anyone to inhale. I am thinking that Rosco fluid may be a safe alternative but may be a little difficult to obtain the correct diffusion. Might someone have another suggestion for a safe material which might remain airborne?
  5. My Panasonic AF-100 HDMI produces a 4:2:0 signal. If I was to use my Atomos Assassin with the AF-100 would there be an advantage over using the Atomos Ninja with an HDMI output? The basic signal remains HD and it's my understanding that it can not be up converted. I am not sure if there is an advantage to the Assassin? I know if I was to use the SDI output of the AF-100 I would have an 8 bit 4:2:2 signal with the Ninja and SDI adapter. Thank you
  6. Stewart, Thank you for asking. My first venture into 4K is with a Panasonic GH4. I am using Canon EF lenses, Panasonic lenses and also a set of Bower EF mount lenses. I have a set of Lecia R lenses and also Canon FL series from my younger days.
  7. Thank you Dom I found the article informative. Today i tested my 4K camera with lenses from several manufacturers and discovered all of them produced good images. With regard to color rendition I remember as a young still phtographer (when film was our mainstay) being told that manufacturers spend considerable time and expense matching the output color of their lenses so that film would have the same consistant color appearance regardless of focal length. My tests indicated that this was true and regardless of the focal length the color was consistent. Your point is well taken and the more important factor may be to select a series of the lenses from the same manufacturer. In response to Phil, it is my understanding that still camera lenses were producd with a greater contrast primarily for black and white film. Thank you
  8. Thank you Phil Film does require more contrast and I did not consider that factor so I appreciate you bringing this to my attention.
  9. With the advent of the 4/3 mount system a wide variety of lenses are now availble for use in HD and 4K acquisition. Lenses produced prior to the digital era may provide a specific look but for general production may not provide adequate resolution for HD or 4K production. Is there a standard suggested minimum resolution for lenses used for 4K acquisition? Are lower end lenses such as the Bower series and still lenses such as the Canon EF series of significant resolution to meet the requirements of 4K?
  10. With the advent of the 4/3 mount system a wide variety of lenses are now availble for use in HD and 4K acquisition. Lenses produced prior to the digital era may provide a specific look but for general production may not provide adequate resolution for HD or 4K production. Is there a standard suggested minimum resolution for lenses used for 4K acquisition? Are lower end lenses such as the Bower series and still lenses such as the Canon EF series of significant resolution to meet the requirements of 4K?
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