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Adam Froehlich

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About Adam Froehlich

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  • Occupation
    1st Assistant Camera
  • Location
    Cincinnati

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  1. Your post made me curious about the digital post-production workflows of yore, but I can't find a single mention of a Conga film recorder software on Google. Does anyone have any resources on what made it legendary, and how it was used? Even plain documentation would be interesting to look through!
  2. There's considerable play in the mounting points for the 15mm rod bracket on my Arri MMB-2 matte box. It seems to be on a part that can't simply be tightened, but is embedded. It's just a tiny variance at the actual rod, but that little bit gets translated into a considerable wobble at the top of the mattebox once it's mounted on rods. Does anyone know how to tighten this up? Are these little mounting points threaded into the mattebox itself, or embedded? The mattebox itself is fairly new, bought new Winter 2018, and has really only seen light work in the studio (only 1 or 2 operators/assistants) Photos attached, Video for reference: In the video, the mounting bracket is rock solid on the mounting points, it's the points themselves that have movement.
  3. What length are you looking for? It looks like Tilta makes 12" threaded rods, but it doesn't specify the thread size. SMALLRIG makes 15mm Rods threaded with m12 threads on the end(up to 16"), CAMVATE has an m12-to-1/4x20 adapter. I can't speak to their quality. You could maybe get generic metal rods custom threaded with M12 threads and just use the SMALLRIG adapter if you need a specific length, or over 16" https://www.amazon.com/SmallRig-Aluminum-Camera-System-2-1053/dp/B00AZFX77S?th=1 https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1453930-REG/camvate_c1964_1_4_20_female_to_m12.html
  4. I use these + C-Stand for interviews and smaller one-man-band type things when I don't have a sound guy: https://www.amazon.com/Neewer-Microphone-Boompole-Support-Holder/dp/B00YEEDJF6/
  5. I got this as an ad today on Instagram, seems to offer 60w out from D-tap, and 90w out from 4-pin XLR (a D-tap-to-4Pin would seem like it would work?). They claim the 90W is compatible with all MacBooks https://rencherindustries.com/products/usb-tap?variant=31630322991207 They also have this more expensive solution that is a direct battery mount (gold or v-mount) https://rencherindustries.com/products/usb-c-battery-adapter-for-inovativ-digisystem I have no experience with their products, but just wanted to offer up alternatives.
  6. Agreed, I signed up for the trial to watch the HDR versions of all the Star Wars movies and was extremely disappointed with the Dolby HDR master of the originals. Maybe my TV isn't up to snuff (I did take time to tweak some settings and make sure HDR was enabled correctly), or maybe I'm just not used to HDR materials, but everything felt dark and lacking contrast, even the snow on Hoth felt extremely grey. I'm going to check out the prequels tonight, I'm curious to see if they're any different with their more modern look. I'm wondering if it's because of they were obviously not shot with HDR in mind, does anyone know of any good HDR versions of classic movies that I should check out?
  7. Adobe After Effects would be ideal. Technically Premiere could do it, with less control/features. Since you seem to be working with a lot of free software (judging from other questions you've posted), I would suggest checking out DaVinci Resolve. It's free, and can do pretty much everything you've asked about. It can seem intimidating, but is incredibly powerful for being free (or honestly if it was paid.) Well worth the time to learn it.
  8. I remember seeing this in Reddit, could be similar: https://i.imgur.com/7C2qJDC.gifv
  9. Jason Cases will make custom cases with engraving and such, but they're likely fairly expensive judging by the pricing on their standard cases... https://www.jasoncases.com/store/pages/custom-case-faq/
  10. After Effects has CC Vector Blur, which can be used to blur in one direction. Using that youtube tutorial and replacing Directional with Vector blur would work great. You have to do some tinkering with Vector blur though, set the type to Directional Fading, and set the vector map source as any plain solid, and you can control the direction with Angle Offset.
  11. Are you expecting to use it for 1 project at a time? Your RAID idea is what I would be looking into, especially if you're going to put SSDs in it. As for Thunderbolt, if your motherboard doesn't have thunderbolt already, you can't just add it via PCIe, you have to have internal TB headers as well. The expansion cards simply add the ports, but still need the underlying Thunderbolt architecture on the motherboard. Chances are if you don't have any ports on the IO board, you won't be able to add it.
  12. Quicktime Player will show 'Data Rate' in the 'Movie Inspector' (Window > Show Movie Inspector).
  13. Many codecs do not allow for odd-numbered resolutions, H264 being one of them. The compression relies on blocks of pixels, so they must at least be divisible by 2 (others can require larger intervals, such as being divisible by 8.) You will have to push back with the client, or see if they'll accept another codec suitable for web without those limitations (though most compressed formats will have it.)
  14. I agree with Robin, dark vessel + light reflecting from the top of the water creates the most convincing look. A mirror in the bottom will reflect more light, but that will dilute the ripple effect itself. An Instagram page I follow had a recent post about doing a very similar effect with strips of mylar: It's not quite the same effect as water, it doesn't have the organic ripples, but it is a much easier process.
  15. I DIYed some for my Quasar T8's. From Amazon, I got a pigeon plate for $11, and for $9 I got a 24-pack of T8 clips, so it's about $12-20 USD each, depending on how many you need to make. The rubberish coating on the clips I got were cheapy, and kind of tore away after the first few times putting tubes in and out resulting in some light scratches, so it may be worth not buying the absolute cheapest you can find. The official Quasar Q-Blocks would provide a better hold, but you'd probably have to attach it with adhesive. I'm sure there are good T12 options. It's worked well so far, it's currently holding the Quasar I use as my only light in the living room...
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