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Found 8 results

  1. Hello! I've been shooting Super8 for about a year now after playing around with regular 8mm since 2019. I recently ran into an issue with one cartridge of Ektachrome 100D. I'm shooting with a serviced Nizo S8T and I'm pretty sure it's not a camera issue but I don't have enough experience with Super8 to say that with full confidence. The reason why i think it was the cartridge is because I shot with another roll of Ektachrome 100D a week later and that footage did not have any issues. The problem I'm seeing is severe image jittering and jumping. Could this be caused by a lack of lubrication inside the cartridge or the film just being wound too tight inside? Anything I should look for before Insert the cartridge? Looking for any tips or tricks to help prevent this from happening! Thanks!
  2. Hello everybody, writing from Argentina. This weekend i'm pretending to shoot my first Ektachrome 100D super 8 cartridge on my Canon Auto Zoom 518 SV, i've been hearing that many cartridges from the last years and now days, are coming with factory failures (such as: film is getting stuck and not moving in cartridge). Wanted to know if anybody had the same problem or any issues with this type of emulsion. Heard that they used to sell like these metal plates to put on the cartridge to prevent film getting stucked but really I don't know if this problem is true and if it is, if the solution is also true. Think I read also that you can oil (with a specific liquid) the cartridge film part, so It can help that the film move correctly. Any info related to this or tips for shooting Ektachrome 100D or any emulsion, would help me a lot. Thanks
  3. Today I finished confirming that Ektachrome 100D (Super 8 ), is not a film to shoot until at least 2 years have passed, that no one has complained that the film got stuck. After a unique weekend shooting the ektachrome, the counter on my camera (Canon Auto Zoom 518SV) tells me that the entire film had already been exposed. Excited about everything I thought I had filmed, I take out the cartridge and see that it doesn't say "exposed", as it normally should. Just then, the various comments I had read about this emulsion in particular and the flaws with which it had been coming out of the factory fell into my head. I had never given it much thought because I had also read positive comments, so the only thing left for me was to try it myself and see how it goes. After noticing this, I re-marked it with a marker and the film didn't move, I tried moving it slowly with my fingers and it didn't move, I tried moving it hard with my fingers and it didn't move either. So I came to the conclusion that more cartridges are coming out of the factory with faults than in good condition. The first cartridge (Kodak Vision 3 50D) that I had shot, new camera, I accepted that something could go wrong because I was testing the camera (which at first glance looked in excellent condition). I also had problems (I didn't know about the care of the cartridges and made some mistakes) and the film was exposed only 1m of the 3m and cents at 18fps that should last. So I said, I'll take care of the next cartridge (Ektachrome) like gold, that's how it was, but what happened happened. What I have also read is that this camera in particular, over time the motor expands and that it is also quite weak (motor), perhaps it is one of the reasons that neither of the 2 cartridges exposed the entire film? The question that remains for me is whether to take my camera to do a service or directly buy a fully conditioned one with a service already done, and perhaps one with a strong motor to avoid that in the future, when I dare again to try to shoot an Ekta, don't be a problem. I don't want to make a discharge about Ektachrome, but more than anything to know what you guys think, to know your experiences and everything in general. Today I ended the day wanting to just put the camera back in its box on top of a shelf until the urge to shoot comes back. The truth is that I started 1 year ago with super 8 and I'm not an expert, but I do know that there are some in this group, so correct me if I'm wrong about something. Delighted to read your opinions on this, thank you very much and sorry for so much delirium.
  4. I still can’t believe why Kodak keeps making f*cked up ektachrome 100D cartridges, today I thought i’ve finished my cartridge of super 8 on my trip, and it resulted that it got stuck, i really can’t believe it… The first time I shot my first cartridge I knew something bad could happen because I was testing my camera (Canon Auto Zoom 518 SV), but results that my camera is in excelent conditions and works perfect. We will never know until 5 years go on with no one complaining about ektachrome super 8, when Kodak finally starts to make decent and fully funcional cartridges. It’s so sad to have spent for the 2nd time so much money on a cartridge, but it’s more sad that once again, I lost the movie I tried to film of my unique trip with my friends… I’m seriously thinking in stop trying to film super 8 and just leave my camera on my shelf… Sorry for the bad word, but i’m very disappointed…
  5. Kodak Ektachrome 100D Double Super-8 16/8 2R 122 meter / 400 feet Kodak 7285 CAT 186 1681 One metal can, never opened, from cooled storage. NOT homebrew DIY. Kodak original perforation in Kodak packaging. Bought it for a project from USA, own import. It is now in Europe. Save on duties while it is here. Never made it into the work and I don't expect any use in the short or long time. Nice to expose in DS-8 camera like Elmo Filmatic of Canon Scoopic for maximum sharpness or slit it into two strands and use these to fill 16 pieces of loadable Super-8 cartridges. Over 50 minutes of running time at 18fps! You can have it easily have it processes at any ciné lab which does E-6 Now selling it at USD $950 or EURO equivalent I have images of the offered can, the website is very limited on storage. IBAN banking preferred Paypal available at +3% I have an over 700 eBay positive feedback Rolls of 400ft of single strand meterware Super-8 was offered at Euro 400 http://www.filmvorfuehrer.de/topic/22761-kodak-ektachrome-100d/page__hl__%2Bektachrome+%2B400 And sold out quickly... No to forget the USA based 20 cartridge cases at $1900 or 2 cartridges at $170 Excerpts from Kodak Datasheet https://www.super8.nl/file/7285.pdf TECHNICAL DATA / COLOR REVERSAL FILM KODAK EKTACHROME 100D Color Reversal Film 5285 / 7285 is a 100-speed, high-color reversal motion picture camera film intended for photography under daylight illumination (5500K). It offers strikingly saturated color performance while maintaining a neutral gray scale and accurate flesh reproduction. 5285/7285 Film has exceptional sharpness that is unsurpassed by any other 100-sp eed reversal film, and its grain performance is excellent. This film also offers very strong reciprocity uniformity and keeping stability. This film offers outstanding results in outdoor and studio applications where strong color saturation is desired. It is excellent for advertising, nature cinematography, documentaries, music videos, and is especially good for telecine transfers and television filming. BASE Acetate safety base. EXPOSURE INDEXES Daylight (5500K): 100 Tu n g s t e n ( 3 2 0 0 K ) : 25 (with 80A filter) Use these indexes with incident- or reflected-light exposure meters and cameras marked for ISO or ASA speeds or exposure indexes. These indexes apply for meter readings of average subjects made from the camera position or for readings ma de from a gray card of 18-percent reflectance held close to and in front of the subject. For unusually light- or dark-colored subjects, decrease or increase the exposure indicated by the meter accordingly.
  6. Hi all, Just a question: WeIl I still have three unopened 100ft rolls of 16mm Kodak Ektachrome 100D in my freezer. Love that film stock! Got it still at reasonable prices a few months back. One is © 2001 and two are © 2009. No exp. date. I'm planning on using one roll (the 2009 stock) for shooting our band during sound check on stage, run and gun style (outside, sunlight - very likely the weather will be clear skies). The film stock seems to have been stored properly. Still: my Q: should I compensate for film speed (sensitivity) loss? If it was neg, I'd simply rate the 2009 stock about 70-80ASA and the 2001 stock about 50 or even lower. Kind of afraid to blow my highlights, since it is reversal, but underexposed it would look very grainy (at the moment I only can afford a 2K scan with the Muller HD at Gauge Film, UK. They always do a really great job, maintaining the grain structure and look, but compensating in post for wrong exposure only goes so far). The footage will be Super 16mm and meant to be used for 1080p uploads (YouTube, Vimeo). Any tips highly appreciated! Thanks! Cheers, Christian
  7. I just started getting into super-8 last year. I had an old Canon 514 XLS. Late last year, I started experimenting with Ektachrome 100D for outdoor use. As someone with no experience working with actual film, it seemed like the easiest, most affordable film stock to use for outdoor filming. I had to take a break for a bit, but now that I'm coming back, it seems like this stock has been discontinued. I've been trying to figure out what some other good film stocks would be. Does anyone have any suggestions or even a list of different super-8 film stocks? Since I don't know much about film stock, I've been having trouble even figuring out what I should get next and what I should experiment with. I see Wittnerchrome being mentioned a lot on forums, but, besides being unable to make sense of their website, it seems like their cartridges are going for upwards of $30, which is a pretty big jump over what I paid for Ektachrome. Right now, I'm just looking to experiment and figure super-8 filmmaking out, preferably affordably as possible.
  8. Hi, I have 10 rolls of Ektachrome 100D that are surplus to my film project. I would keep them for myself, but I have a few rolls left for my own personal use and think it is wrong to hoard film. These 10 rolls could be perfect for someone elses film project! The stock was purchased fresh from Kodak in December 2012 - and has been kept frozen since. As you know this is discontinued stock - there is now no colour reversal stock available from Kodak - and these are going for high prices on eBay, HOWEVER I am not greedy like some of those eBay sellers, and therefore I am open to reasonable offers. I accept payment by paypal or bank transfer. Postage / shipping costs to your area are negotiable - but I will only ship registered. Please drop me a PM if you are interested. Thanks, Jamie.
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