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Found 16 results

  1. I’m pretty confused on this fact about contact printers, color timing, and printer lights, so hopefully someone will be able to shed a little light on this subject. A number of professionals on this sight have referred to the color timing process done with printer lights as a "subtractive color process”, yet I’ve read quite a few guides and manuals from both Kodak as well as Bell and Howell that explicitly says the opposite. The Bell and Howell Model C manual says that, prior to 1961, contact printers utilized a subtractive lamphouse which required the use of a vast number of ELM (Eastman Lamphouse Modification) filters if one wanted to make scene to scene color corrections. This was a very tedious and time consuming process. A subtractive printer uses a white light source to produce properly balanced prints. Combinations of color filters control the amounts of red, green and blue light. Printing that requires a lot of scene-to-scene color corrections is very difficult on a subtractive printer because a new color-correcting filter pack must be physically inserted between the light source and the printing aperture for every correction. Overall light changes (intensity changes) are made by using a variable aperture or a neutral density filter. This problem was eventually solved with the advent of the additive lamphouse. "Modern additive printers use a set of standard dichroic mirrors to separate or combine the light from a tungsten-halogen bulb into its red, green and blue components. The mirrors have a multilayer coating of dielectric material that reflects a specific wavelength region while transmitting other regions. Adjustments are made to the mirrors to achieve the desired color balance on the final print". Over the decades, subtractive color timing was phased out and eventually went extinct, replaced entirely by the much simpler, speedier, and more direct additive model. From what I’ve seen, all of the contact printers still in use today are built with an additive lamphouse, exclusively utilizing an RGB color model as opposed to a CMY model. From searching I’ve done, I cannot seem to find a single contact printer still in use or operating in 2024 which uses a subtractive lamphouse. Yet even to my eyes, so much of the final print work that I’ve seen timed with a B&H Model C additive lamphouse bears a very strong resemblance to a more traditional subtractive color finish in terms of density, saturation, hue, and tonal rendition. This whole revelation now seems all the more confusing to me as I first learned about printer lights through DaVinci Resolve, and that whole hotkey model operates on seven distinct levels: red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow, and the master. And now I’ve come to learn that actual printer lights only utilize three, red, green, and blue (with the master being controlled by raising or lowering those three values by the exact same amount). Stupid Question: Why couldn't one simply use the additive timing method with the dichroic mirrors, only with CMY taking the place of its corresponding RGB counterparts. I’m not sure if that would require a 4,800K white bulb instead of a 3,200K Tungsten one that additive lamphouses need. What is it about the subtractive timing process that absolutely requires the use of all those filters instead of simply the mirrors and deflectors?
  2. Quick 3 minute DaVinci Resolve video showing the application of the 2383 LUT byBoz™ onto Blackmagic Cinema Camera 6K Full Frame BRAW footage (BMCC 6K FF Gen 5). The 2383 LUT is available for ALL Blackmagic Design Color Sciences - BRAW to Rec709 LUTs also available in BMD or Arri Alexa flavours 😊 Website: https://blackmagic-luts.yolasite.com/
  3. For anyone interested in the color grade plugin Dehancer and how the color grading controls work. Maybe I should have a 'Sh**ty Tutorial' series on YouTube? ? ? Bulent w: https://bulentfilms.yolasite.com/ ig: https://www.instagram.com/bulent0z/
  4. Had a chance to film super quick improv short film with the Fujifilm XH2s the other day. Now I wouldn't say I have an "obsession" with the anamorphic look, more like a raging fascination with the aesthetics ? Shot in 6K open gate mode. Color grade in DaVinci Resolve using a combination of LUTs byBoz™ and Dehancer. The Flog 2 footage held up well considering how destructive the color grading was. Not that you can tell with the "amazing" YouTube compression ? Thoughts? Bulent w: https://bulentfilms.yolasite.com/ ig: https://www.instagram.com/bulent0z/
  5. Anamorphic Knights is short film (test) using a Kowa 8z Anamorphic lens adapter combined with a Blackmagic 4K Production Camera. I've been looking at much older camera systems for a good few years now. Recently picked up a Blackmagic Production Camera 4K and started with this first test. Is it me or does the image feel a lot more organic/analogue like compared to newer cameras? Be great to hear your thoughts.
  6. Hey All, here's a quick character intro for a project that I'm aiming to direct this year. Shot on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K with SLR Magic 1.33x Anamorphic Lens Adapter. Base color grade via a BMPCC 4K to Arri Rec709 conversion LUT that I created and have been testing. Might release if there's interest. Blackmagic LUTs byBoz™ are available to download here: https://blackmagic-luts.yolasite.com/ There's a specific "imperfect" anamorphic look that I'm going for. Haven't quite found it yet, but overall I think the combo works really well. Thoughts?
  7. Anamorphic Knights is short film (test) using a Kowa 8z Anamorphic lens adapter combined with a Blackmagic 4K Production Camera. I've been looking at much older camera systems for a good few years now. Recently picked up a Blackmagic Production Camera 4K and started with this first test. Is it me or does the image feel a lot more organic/analogue like compared to newer cameras? Be great to hear your thoughts. Blackmagic LUTs byBoz: https://blackmagic-luts.yolasite.com/ IG: https://www.instagram.com/bulent0z/
  8. While shooting a night scene in slog3 why we should shoot it 1 stop over at 12800 ISO, so as to have low noise, but if we raise the Iso from 800 to 12800 doesn't that increases the noise ? I am confused please help me, I want to use slog3 for night shoot without having noise so that I have full opportunity for color grading.
  9. What's New? This is a brand new Natural Rec709 conversion LUT that I've created specifically for the Gen 5 Color Science as requested by fellow filmmakers. Humbled that so many put in a request after the success of the original P4K LUT and BMD OG Rec709 LUT. Thank you. LUT Features ALL NEW Kodak Vision 2 Cine Curve * softer highlight roll-off preserved shadow detail balanced saturation organic (camera) colors *Not a mathematically accurate film response curve. More an obsessive compulsive interpretation on my part based on analysis of numerous film chart data. Download Page: https://bulentfilms.yolasite.com/ (Scroll down to Blackmagic Camera LUTs)
  10. A Masked Luchadore. A Call to Action. 'Santo Drive' is a visual homage to Nicolas W. Refn's 'Drive' (2011). Shot on a BMPCC 4K with a Kowa 8z Anamorphic lens adapter. BRAW 8:1 (Sandisk SDXC). ISO 3200 ? Color Grade based on my Blackmagic Pocket 4K LUT. Download Available HERE: https://bulentozdemirfilms.wordpress.com/bozbmdfilm_p4k-to-rec709-lut/
  11. After the success of the original BozBMDFilm to Rec709 LUT for all Blackmagic Cinema Cameras, there were many requests from fellow filmmakers for a new Rec709 LUT for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K (P4K). I had no intentions of creating one, but as I'm always looking for ways to simply my own work flow I thought, what the hell. Features: Custom Cine Curve Organic Color Values Balanced Saturation Preserved Shadow Detail Preserved Highlight Detail * Softer Highlight Roll Off Download Page: https://bulentozdemirfilms.wordpress.com/bozbmdfilm_p4k-to-rec709-lut/
  12. I apologize in advance for this post being so long. Screenshots of the color grade and video links are at the bottom of the post. --- A few years ago, I ran across a Vimeo, under the name Organik Cineworks. They are a Hungarian couple that creates wedding videos. I saw one of their videos, and loved their editing style, so I followed them. Now, I am obsessed with their color grading. Let me just say, they are SO difficult to get in contact with, because a) They're Hungarian, and b) They probably don't have time to answer someone's questions about their grading. HOWEVER, after emailing and messaging them through their social medias, I finally got a response. To summarize, the couple said this: We grade using LUTs in Lumetri, Premiere Pro, but cannot say which LUTs we are using. We have different presets of a LUT to fit different lighting conditions. I then said that I understood, and asked if they could forward me the scopes from one of their videos. The scopes I received are also at the bottom of this post. I changed the subject and asked about the settings they use on their a6300. I have the same set-up as them: All of our films were captured using the a6300. We shoot in PP6 Cine 4, and find it to be just as beautiful as S-log without the need of constant high ISO. We do not use noise reduction in post. Finally, I decided to shoot my shot once more and inquire about the LUTs they use, because I literally. cannot. find. them. anywhere. I had searched for hours, so I started to wonder if they were specifically "wedding LUTs", or maybe they were LUTs not available online for purchase, and Organik Cineworks made the LUTs themselves. I also found similar ones to theirs (White in Revery and Kreativ wedding LUTs), so I asked if I was on the right track. Here's the response I received: White in Revery and Kreativ LUTs are indeed similar to the ones we use ? Yes, it's a wedding LUT that wasn't made by us, but we really can't say more than that. I left it at that, and really didn't want to bother them anymore. I then went into Premiere Pro and tried my hardest to replicate it myself. The result is something that reminds me of their crushed blacks, desaturated greens, white highlights, and general warm, earthy vibe, but isn't exactly IT. I am a huge perfectionist, and cannot accept the fact that it isn't just like theirs. Here is a screenshot from my attempt: https://imgur.com/a/UqWA1qH I ended up using Kreativ's "Osmara" LUT as a base, and made some minor tweaks. Below are the scopes they sent me and the screenshots of the grading. If you would like to watch the videos instead, here are the links to a few of their recent ones where the grading is consistent: VIDEO LINKS https://vimeo.com/311253998 https://vimeo.com/293844993 https://vimeo.com/294623662 SCOPES https://imgur.com/a/05SW8W5 SCREENSHOTS Here is a link to my Imgur album with all screenshots. --- Please let me know if you recognize these colors and know what LUTs they're using. I get roasted every time I post this on Reddit. Those commenting say these colors are very generic and can be found in nearly any LUT pack. I disagree. I've never seen this exact grading style before. I normally see the generic orange-teal, while this is more of a brown and desaturated green. I know a LUT is simply a base for grading mostly log footage, and of course can be tweaked. I also realize that just because I may find out the name of the LUT they use, doesn't mean I will achieve the exact look their videos have. There are many other factors to take into account. However, I genuinely am curious to know where they're getting these beautiful colors from at this point, and have been wracking my brain combing through LUTs online. I'm not trying to copy them, as I rarely do wedding videos and have my own film style myself. I just would like to post and see if anyone recognizes this LUT. Thanks ?
  13. Shot this little short film on an original BMPCC + Kowa 8z Anamorphic Adapter. Color graded to taste. Hope you enjoy :)
  14. JL Cooper Eclipse CX Coloring Board. Has very little wear or signs of use and comes equipped with an ethernet in the port. All lights and functions work perfectly. It was previously used to grade feature films but we don’t use it anymore. For a full list of features and specifications, please see below: Features • Works with DaVinci Resolve • New support in Snell Archangel Ph.C - HD • Speeds Color Grading Workflow • Integrated Compact Control Surface Saves Space • Precise, Hi-Resolution, Professional Quality Controls • Easy-to-See Illuminated Keyswitches • Attractive, Low Profile and Compact Design • Software for OSX Lets You Use Eclipse CX with Any Application. (A JLCooper Exclusive) Specifications • Width - 25.75 in (65.4 cm) • Depth - 11.5 in (29.21 cm) • Height - 3.25 in (8.26 cm) • Weight - 14 lb (6.35 kg)
  15. I have been having an issue when color grading lately with the C300. After the grade, most blacks that are below 40 IRE seem to be artifacting like crazy on youtube. Whereas I don't see this from other people's work. Ive tried these encode settings in adobe media encoder, Quicktime MOV, h264 55'000 kbps 1920 x 818 Quicktime MOV, h264 35'000 kbps 1920 x 818 Quicktime MOV, h264 25'000 kbps 1920 x 818 Quicktime MOV, Prores 444 1920 x 818 But all of them just aren't cutting it and I dont know what I'm missing. My blacks are generally not brought down to 0 because the director wants a low contrasty look and some scenes were shot very dimly with only one LED to light the scene. On the other hand, we've lit darker scenes with several 1k's and Litepanel LEDs and while the highlights and midtones held up the blacks still artifacted hard. Here is an unlisted link to a test video I made. Please don't share outside of the community. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4d3WQT4hcN4 Any and all info would be much appreciated!
  16. I am planning on shooting a short film with my T4i, planning on grading it black and white in post. I know that lighting for black and white is different than color and requires some more contrast (because color is no longer a factor). What do you think the best way to gauge what it will look like in black and white, short of metering and hoping?
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