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Found 2 results

  1. I shot a short roll of Kodak 500T (16mm). Upon finishing I noticed, much to my dismay, that the ISO on my light meter was set to 50. So, the fast film's exposure index is rated at 500T and I overexposed by how many stops? Can either push or pull (pull, right?) processing save this spool? The negative is probably pretty dense too, right? I saw a latitude test where film was overexposed by 5+ stops and it looked nice. Hoping there's a way to remedy this problem.
  2. Hi guys, so I'm going to shoot a movie for university, and I want to use 25 fps, in order to give the famous "film-look" to the image... my problem is that in some shots I'd like to obtain a depth of field as shallow as possible. So here's my dilemma: they say when you're shooting in 25 fps, the maximum quality of image results in using 50 shutter speed (fps * 2); but if I use 50 shutter speed, then the aperture would be affected: and as you know, in order to obtain a shallow depth of field you should have the aperture all the way open, which in my case, with 50 shutter speed, could r
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