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Found 2 results

  1. Supervising colorspaces in different parts of the chain. As I understand it, Digital Cinema Projections are in P3 colorspace, and TV/DVD/Web is rec.709 colorspace. Then, as for the workflow. Images are captured in colorspace X (depending on the camera/stock) In the DI, images are converted to another colorspace, lets just say ACES In the master the images are then converted into either P3 or Rec.709 depending on the format. My questions are, 1. How do we know which colorspace we are exporting to? E.g. What colorspace does H.264, ProRes422 (HQ) or ProRes4444 have? Can you recommend any places to read up on this? 2. And how do we ensure to keep colors within the intended colorspace, as to not lose out of gamut colors when exporting? 3. I often use a Kodak2383 emulsion LUT when grading which clips out of gamut colors and remaps them to the closest color of same luminance. I suppose the gamut / colorspace is calculating what can be printed to Kodak2383 film. Do you know of any way that I can see / test how wide this colorspace is compared to P3 and rec.709? 4. I work with dailies & grades in photoshop as references for the colorists. Can you recommend a website where to read about color-management in photoshop as to stay within gamut, and 5. Would you recommend any specific image format. DPX, TIFF or PNG etc. for colorspace and accurate color rendition? Thanks guys, Will
  2. Hi guys, After watching the excellent THR cinematographers roundtable, I feel compelled to draw more attention to one of the key issues they discuss - the lack of control of the final image in todays modern world of different screens and projector standards. I've been lucky enough to have a few films I've shot recently coloured by Rob Pizzey and Adam Glasman at Co3 in London and we've achieved results I've been delighted with in their colouring sweet, both in the P3 space on their projector, and in Rec709 on their Dolby monitors. The problem however, is when we output to home deliverables in Rec709 h264, the image is so drastically different on my home macbook, iPad, TV that I find when sharing it I'm constantly having to explain and apologise for the final quality. Personally I've found this much less of a problem with DCPs in theatres, but modern displays at home are surely capable of better. It strikes me that rec709 (created in 1990 for TV) surely can't still be the answer for grading to a standard that will look good across all devices. Of course the issue is in two parts here, but is there a push anywhere to standardise a modern colour space and standard across hardware, that can reap the benefits of more dynamic range, contrast and better colour representation? I've heard about rec2020, but as far as I can see this seems to be just for 4K TVs? Would love to hear your thoughts and hopefully there's an answer out there in the works, to ensure a more modern and standardised presentation of the work we do in peoples homes and on their devices. Eben
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