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Found 15 results

  1. Hey guys! I just finished a 16mm shoot and am on the process of sending the negatives do be processed by CineLab London. They offer tons of scanning solutions and I'm kind of confused with some of them. Would love if you guys could help me with some questions :) 1.They state that all of the scans are deliveres as .dpx "full frame" files - Full Frame is only the image? Or will I see the borders, sprockets and etc? 2. What does it mean to have the negatives "overscanned"? They offer this option only on the Scanity scans - does it means that I'll see the sprockets, borders, etc?
  2. Hi, I just want to share link to Paul-Anthony Mille´s posthouse: http://kafardfilms.fr/film-stocks-processing/ He is doing so far, the cheapest work in Europe. 16mm - 400ft = 200 € 35mm - 400ft = 150 € (Prices are for developming, cleaning and 2K/4K scanning) Development is done by Hiventy lab, Paris and Paul is doing scans at his posthouse. I have not met Paul in person yet, I just want to share this cheap and great quality alternative on market 🙂 Many people already know Paul, but for those who not, this is the solution to keep you shootin
  3. I'm a student who is about to shoot a 5min 35mm short. The final look we are going for is one with very minimal grain and no noise. This 5207 test video shot by Kodak is a good example of what we are looking for.    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCxr7YeD0C4   The key thing here is minimal grain and noise. I've been looking into various post houses and the equipment they have and came up with this list:    Fotokem - Spirit  Metro Post - Director Gamma Ray Digital - ScanStation Cinelab - Xena Nolo Digital - Arriscan FilmVideoSolutions - Spiri
  4. Hey everyone! So I live in NYC and I've been shooting Super 8 as a fairly serious hobby since last summer. I love it. This forum has been a source of so much info. I've already bought several cameras, shot vacations, field trips, events, etc. Problem obviously is it ain't cheap! And even more of an issue is minimums. Given that I don't normally shoot 4+ rolls at a time, I've been forced to wait for weeks if not months while I slowly shoot more rolls until I meet the minimums. I've gotten developing from Spectra with their film+processing packs for ~$40/roll but that of course doesn't i
  5. Just wanted to take a moment to talk about a recent experience with Gamma Ray Digital. After a less-than-ideal experience with another east coast business, I talked to Perry at GRD about scanning for a short I was shooting. He was polite and answered all of my questions clearly and quickly. their pricing was cheaper than every option I found in LA, and it was simple to budget for the scan since their scanning is done by the foot, NOT by the hour. I shot about 3900' of 5-8 year old 35mm color neg for this short. It was all processed and prepped for transfer by Fotokem in LA, and I over
  6. First post on this forum. I must say, having never actually worked with film before, I'm glad I found this website. Very informative. DISCLAIMER: Never having worked with film, my knowledge comes entirely from the internet, no hands on experience. So if I say anything that sounds absurd, just let me know. Having always used digital cameras, I want to shoot a movie on Super 16mm film, and have it finished on 35mm film. I've been trying to work out the workflow to get from the exposed negatives to that final print. I want to have it photochemically color timed, preferably without ever having a
  7. Hey crew, Hope this isn't against any rules but figured if there was ever an audience for this, it's everyone here. So I just wanted to spread the word and ask for help for an amazing cinema arts organization here in NYC. It's called Mono No Aware and its director, Steve Cossman, has been running really fantastic 8mm and 16mm film based workshops and screenings in NYC and honestly all over the country and world for 10 years now. Most of those workshops have been out of its directors apartment in Brooklyn as well as NYC-based community darkrooms. I just want to be clear... I don't work
  8. I've been lurking here for some time, reading and doing some research. I have thousands of hours of Super 8mm home movie footage taken from 1967 to 1990 that I am looking to get transferred. I'm dealing with amateur footage that is naturally shaky from the handheld camera, has occasional focus problems, lots of panning around etc. LOTS of poorly lit indoor shots. The film itself is *ok* but it has some dirt, scratches, etc., that you would expect from 30-40 year old films that have been handled / stored by Average Joes. It also has lots of splices. After doing some research here, I c
  9. Yes, another 16mm question :) I have two 16mm color double-perf Kodachrome prints (less than 400' each) that I've been storing at the Academy archives in Hollywood. These prints from 1965 & 1968 document two world premieres here in Los Angeles and the color & condition of the both rolls are stunning. I don't think they've ever been projected. When we found them, we originally screened them on a flatbed Moviola and thought we had color reversal film. Closer inspection of the film over the light table revealed it was, in fact, Kodachrome. My question is: what is the best way to b
  10. As it looks like I will be getting either a 2K or 4K scan for my 16mm short film (and not doing a traditional A/B negative cut,) my main concern now is preserving the grain structure that I achieved in-camera. I went for a specific look with this film and pushed 7219 2 stops, creating a nice amount of grain. As I read and look online and different clips on Vimeo & YouTube, I see a lot of 2K scans that look too pristine. Not all, but a lot. So my question is will I still be able to retain that kind of gritty look with a 2K scan, or will it defeat the purpose of the original look I w
  11. BURBANK, Calif. (March 10, 2015) - FotoKem's restoration of Twentieth Century Fox's The Sound of Music will kick off the sixth annual TCM Classic Film Festival on March 26 in Hollywood. Originally released in 1965, the re-mastered version of this cinematic treasure will grace the screen of the TCL Chinese Theater IMAX as the fest's Opening Night Film, as previously announced by TCM. The movie's stars - Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer - will be on hand to introduce the film, along with Turner Classic Movies host Robert Osborne. Directed by Robert Wise and photographed by Ted D. McCor
  12. Hi there, First post on this forum, nice to meet you. I'm looking to get some reels of 9.5mm archive film transferred. I've looked around on the internet (before finding this forum), and am now chatting to Images4Life in the UK. They seem to offer a great balance of options and price. I'm looking for a reference. Can anyone recommend their services? It looks like they're using a flashscan Choice. I'd be getting the scanning done at the full resolution, transcoded to ProRes 444. I see lots of discussion about quality on this thread. Does anyone have anything to add? Thanks! Ste
  13. February Scanning Special For the month of February, Gamma Ray Digital is offering the following special rate for Super8 and 16mm 2k scans to DPX or ProRes files on our Lasergraphics ScanStation. This is only for members of the Cinematography.com forums: 2k DPX Log scans from negative -OR- 2k DPX or ProRes flat scans (ungraded) from prints/reversal: 16mm, 16bit DPX: $0.43/foot 16mm, 10bit DPX or ProRes 4444 or ProRes 422 HQ: $0.35/foot Super-8, 16bit DPX: $0.54/foot Super-8, 10bit DPX or ProRes 4444 or ProRes 422 HQ: $0.50/foot No extra fees for optical audio capture. Low minimum order size
  14. As some of you may know, we recently acquired a Lasergraphics ScanStation at Gamma Ray Digital. We're putting together some demo videos, and would like to include as many formats as the scanner can handle. We're all set with Regular 8, Super8 and 16mm, but if you have high quality (sharp, well lit, G-rated) footage in Super 16, Ultra 16 or Max 8, please send me a PM. We're looking for things like landscapes/cityscapes, architectural footage, nature footage, slow motion or timelapse. Basically, footage with relatively little camera motion so that we can easily put titles over it. In exc
  15. Hey guys, Apologies if it's been covered already. I'm in talks with a post house here in Melbourne, Australia to get some 16mm film scanned to a 2K ProRes file so I can edit it. She is telling me that the telecine process is $450/hour then the 'digitisation' is an additional $250/hour. I was under the impression that telecine IS the digitisation of film? Am I wrong on this one? Is it a two stage process? If it is then what would be the point of doing a telecine without the aforementioned 'digitisation'? Thanks again!
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