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Found 8 results

  1. Im am curious to gather some opinions. I plan on shooting a short in the near future on 16mm. Naturally my choice of stocks are limited to Kodak, and for production purposes 250D would be my best option. Now, really hate doing color correction and DI. I dont like doing it myself, and I dont want to pay to get a colorist to do it for me. I am wondering, how accurate are the colors of 250D, raw out of the stock? What sort of work would I have to do in post to make them accurate. Are there options for me in filtration to normalize the stock? My thought process is, that I want the stock to have an accurate color baseline for me to modify to fit my story. I am looking for a warm, medium contrast, and slightly diffused look. Something in between George Washington (2000) and The Long Goodbye (1973). For this, my idea of was to shoot with some TLS Rehoused Super Baltars, and apply a Tiffen Warm Black Pro-Mist 1/4. What do you think?
  2. Originally posted in FILM STOCKS Im am curious to gather some opinions. I plan on shooting a short in the near future on 16mm. Naturally my choice of stocks are limited to Kodak, and for production purposes 250D would be my best option. Now, really hate doing color correction and DI. I dont like doing it myself, and I dont want to pay to get a colorist to do it for me. I am wondering, how accurate are the colors of 250D, raw out of the stock? What sort of work would I have to do in post to make them accurate. Are there options for me in filtration to normalize the stock? My thought process is, that I want the stock to have an accurate color baseline for me to modify to fit my story. I am looking for a warm, medium contrast, and slightly diffused look. Something in between George Washington (2000) and The Long Goodbye (1973). For this, my idea of was to shoot with some TLS Rehoused Super Baltars, and apply a Tiffen Warm Black Pro-Mist 1/4. What do you think
  3. Hello folks. I'm reading conflicting stuff about the rating of 16mm stock. Do you guys rate your stock a full stop over or 2/3 for day exterior? How about night exterior? I'll be shooting 250D and 50D mostly for now, on regular 16. I'm already compensating for the prism light loss on my Bolex Rex5 so I don't want to overexpose too much. What are your experiences? Thanks for your input!
  4. Hey, Ive got about 4000' of old fuji that I am planning on shooting a short on. Ive had it for about 6 years in my fridge. its half Eterna 250T 8553 and half Eterna 250D 8546. I just got the snip test back from fotokem and it looks like my layers are between .25 (red and green) and .70 (blue) off from what they should be. Im wondering if, for instance, I could add a yellow filter to my lens when I shoot to make the overall shift of my blue channel get back more in line with the other channels? Does it work that simply, or am I missing something. My thinking goes that if I add 1 stop of yellow to the overall image, then that would put my blue channel at roughly .20 over where it needs to be, and then if I over expose by a stop then that will help the overall quality of the image (though it will still be grainier than normal and a little funky in the colors. Is this reasoning sound?
  5. Hi, I have a couple of questions that I'd greatly appreciate any help or advice with regarding shooting with natural light. For an upcoming shoot, one of the scenes written is set on a beach and involves a simple conversation between two characters. The director would like it to be shot in overcast weather - he'd like it to look grey, miserable and "flat", but in an aesthetically pleasing (cinematic?) way. I'm concerned that shooting in overcast weather won't look good, and would love anyones input on how to go about this, or examples of films that have managed it well? The area I am least knowledgable about is in using light modifiers such as flags/bounce boards/etc. Obviously the success of the shoot depends largely on the weather itself - something I can't control! Are there any particular shooting conditions that you would recommend for good results? (ie. is it better to shoot with clear skies and use diffusion/flags etc in a particular way, or shoot in overcast conditions? Using artificial light sources is a possibility but ideally we'd like to stick with natural light only. All the best, Connor
  6. Hi, I'm a student cinematographer with a shoot coming up, on 16mm with the Arri SR3. I have a couple of shoots planned during the blue phase of magic hour (civil twilight and the blue hour), on a beach. I think I'm correct in saying that I need to shoot with daylight colour balance to match the blue tones in the sky as tungsten will make them even cooler? I was wondering if anyone has any thoughts on the different aesthetics of 500T and 250D? (aside from the obvious sensitivity and colour balance differences). Is there any particular advantage (visual or otherwise) to shooting 500t with an 85 or 250d straight up? All the best, Connor
  7. Hey guys, I'm looking for a bit of advice, stock-wise. We're shooting the first ten minutes of our feature film this month and unfortunately my DP is as unfamiliar with film as I am. For outdoor scenes, I'm looking into the KODAK Vision 3 250D. One shot in particular, we transition from the roof of our building to the inside of our apartment. I dug up an article on Fuji's old 250. The tester claimed it would work very well under such a transition. I'm assuming that Kodak can achieve the same result? http://www.fujifilm.com/products/motion_picture/lineup/eterna_vivid250d/demo/ what would you recommend, lighting-wise, once we hit the interior. In the same one-shot, we travel quite aways around the apartment. Sometimes, windows are plentiful, sometimes not so much. for everything else, I thought we could use kodak 500t. but I don't know how that would match up either. does anyone know if I'm looking in the right places? if not, can you point me in the right direction. (i also considered throwing an 85 on something like a 200t to achieve the same effect, but I'm new at this, and I don't really know what I'm talking about) thank you for your help, for more information on our movie check us out at po.st/sowhat
  8. Hey guys, anyone know the difference between the 200T and the 250D? I understand the 250D is for daylight. But for the 200T, its shot alot in daylight, so whats the advantage - AND its tungsten balanced....so it would make sense to shoot at night...with slow speed??? Doesnt make sense. Anyway, hopefully you guys will be able to explain. And please dumb down the technical lingo a tad lol Im not a cinematographer - just someone who wants to learn. I do storyboards, and i might direct in the future and knowing this may come in handy. Thanks! Also, how far can I underexpose with the 200T?? And the 250D? I know with 500T you can go under to EI 1600. But what about these faster stocks?
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