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Found 6 results

  1. Happy Sunday, I recently watched Inherent Vice for the second time and was truly captivated by the cinematography. I loved the soft vintage look, the noticeable but fine grain in the midtones and the creamy lens flare. Does anyone know how this look was accomplished? I've managed to research my way to knowing that Robert Elswit used Panavision Primo spherical primes from the late 80s, but what accounts for the grain? Was the stock simply pushed a few stops to give it a look which matches period in which the film takes place? I've been searching and searching, but I've not managed to find any interviews with Elswit about the process. I also read somewhere that they used "old film stock found in someone's attic", although I haven't been able to confirm this. Any help or leads greatly appreciated! Best, Kaspar
  2. Hey guys, I've loved The Leftovers since season 1, but season 2 has just aired its second episode and I remain stunned by the cinematography, which is now done by Michael Grady (Todd McMullen for most of season 1). It's shot on the Alexa, but it looks SO distinct from everything and anything else I've seen shot on the Alexa, it feels like there's some kind of film grain added because there's a very real and vivid texture to the image, a real patina, the colors pop, but not in a harsh digital way, it doesn't look overly digital, it just really stands out, the lighting also looks beautiful, very colorful. I know they use Primos on this, but I wonder what anyone else think about this, any idea on the film grain or the look they're getting? I'm a film guy mainly, and the only stuff that impressed me on digital so far has been Skyfall, Prisoners, Sicario, A Most Violent Year (yet to see Selma, shot by Bradford Young as well), Drive, Elysium, The Social Network, Gone Girl, Her, Nightcrawler, The Revenant and The Leftovers.
  3. BYDGOSZCZ, POLAND (November 13, 2014) - Panavision, the company behind the world's best cinema lenses for 60 years, is showcasing their new line of Primo 70 lenses optimized to work with today's larger sensor digital cameras. The lenses are being exhibited here at the 22nd edition of the Camerimage International Film Festival, a premier event for directors of photography. "Panavision Primo lenses have set the standard for excellence in motion picture production for 25 years," says Kim Snyder, Panavision's president and CEO. "Now, filmmakers can combine that essential Primo character with the larger sensors found in the latest digital cameras." Panavision Primo 70s are the most advanced cinema lenses ever developed, and specifically designed to work with today's larger sensors. The result is more consistency from edge to edge and sharper corners. The organic flavor, pleasing bokeh, and gradual focus roll-off that DPs depend on have been carefully maintained in the Primo 70 series. Large format sensors are the natural next step for filmmakers looking to create powerful, affecting imagery, and Primo 70 lenses maximize their aesthetic potential. Together, large sensors and Primo 70 lenses deliver unprecedented visual impact. Panavision Primo 70 prime lenses are available in eleven focal lengths: 27mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 65mm, 80mm, 100mm, 125mm, 150mm, 200mm and 250mm. Super 70 zoom lenses are also available in three sizes: 28-80mm, 70-185mm and 200-400mm. The Primo 70 series are equivalent in size and weight to standard Primos, a feature driven by the need for portability and maneuverability on today's film sets. Primo 70 lenses have already been tested in the field under real-world production scenarios, including two feature films and several commercials. "The 70mm Primos are beautiful - just amazing," says Peter Menzies Jr., ACS about his experience using them on a feature film. "I have never seen lenses that hold their sharpness and contrast across the entire frame. ... They are also light, fast and the lens sizes in the kit are perfect. The two zooms we used are excellent -- incredibly close to the primes." "The Panavision 70mm lenses have a grand look," notes Greig Fraser, ASC, ACS who relied on the Primo 70s for a commercial shoot. "Their visual language is significantly different than 35mm. The focus falls off quickly and beautifully. As a cinematographer, this allows me to tell a different story. ... For decades, Panavision has given filmmakers exciting new tools that can open up our imagination. These lenses promise really outstanding new possibilities." Panavision's Dan Sasaki, VP of Optical Engineering, adds, "The cinematographers who have used these lenses reported that they were very happy that we didn't create something that is synthetic or too scientifically sharp. Cinematographers tell us that the character of the lens is even more important with digital cinematography. We maintained the artistry, and preserved the dimensionality that was originally designed for the Primos back in the 1990s. The Primo 70 lenses definitely share the Primo family resemblance." Panavision Primo 70 lenses are the product of state-of-the-art design and manufacturing techniques and materials, and they incorporate feedback from industry pros. Primo 70 lenses are not compatible with film cameras, as they are specifically designed to work with digital cameras. The internal mechanics retain a familiar Primo feel. Floating internal elements control breathing and allow the lens to maintain extremely high performance from infinity to close focus. Currently, Panavision has made Primo 70 mounts for the Sony F55, RED DRAGON, ARRI Alexa (standard and Open Gate), Phantom Flex4K and Phantom 65, with other cameras being assessed for compatibility. "Panavision's unparalleled experience in optical design and lens construction, and our deep and longstanding relationships with filmmakers, have all been brought to bear on these superlative lenses," adds Snyder. "Filmmakers have expressed a need for lenses that work with larger sensors in an array of cameras. We're focused on providing the tools cinematographers need to tell their stories and express their creativity." The Primo 70 series of lenses are available to rent from Panavision worldwide.
  4. For anyone interested in seeing the process http://vimeo.com/109564209
  5. At the forthcoming BSC expo in London, Carey Duffy of Tiffen UK will screen the Tiffen 4K Diffusion tests I shot for them late last year. The tests consisted of a series of simple comparisons between every brand of Diffusion filter Tiffen currently offer and serve as an excellent reference. Designed in conjunction with Steven Poster ASC the test is a simple, but very effective, starting point for a Cinematographer to compare the effect of Tiffens range of Diffusion filters before selecting specific filters to test under their own lighting conditions. We wanted to keep as many of the parameters as simple and unbiased as possible. The light is soft but not too soft to allow us to see the effect of the filter. The half light allows us to judge contrast changes, the backlight and bare bulb allow us to see blooming. Similarly the Primo primes were chosen because I felt they were a). familiar to most Cinematographers worldwide and B). sat somewhere between Master Primes and Cooke S4's in terms of sharpnes and contrast and therefore would be a better lens to showcase the effect of the filter. Shot on a Panavisied Sony F55 in 4K the tests will be presented in 4K at events around the world over the coming months. I believe the idea is that eventually Panavision and Technicolor, who co-sponsored the tests, will have copies of the 4K DCP as reference for projection in facilites around the world, so speak to your local Panavision/Technicolor rep for details, or contact Tiffen directly. For my tastes the current generation of 4K+ cameras are just too sharp, especially when projected at 4K, so for me I cant see myself shooting without some form of filtration either infront of, or behind, the lens, especially if I think the project will be projecting in 4K. I also think a lot of the diffusion filters give the image some texture, something I find lacking in most digital images. It'll be interesting to see how many people feel the same way and perhaps we'll see a resurgence in the use of Diffusion over the coming years. Regardless, these tests should still be a very useful reference for us over the next few years so keep an eye out for them. There's a few BTS images and brief video here along with a few other notes on the tests http://stephenmurphydop.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/notes-on-tiffen-4k-diffusion-tests.html
  6. Hello everyone, Do you have any info on the Panavision Primo Classic "soft effect" mode? I know it is an optical, variable diffusion effect, but I have yet to see the effect on an image. Any links or screenshots? This function is only available on the 24, 30, 65, 85 and 125mm, and I wonder if it cuts well with the other Primo lenses without the effect. Best,
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