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Found 51 results

  1. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) announced this year’s Student Heritage Award winners at an event at the ASC Clubhouse in Hollywood on October 12. Three student filmmakers were chosen from 12 nominees for demonstrating exceptional cinematography skills in their submitted work. The 2019 winners are: Richard H. Kline Student Heritage Award – Graduate Category: • Lucas Dziedzic from the American Film Institute for “Animals” Richard H. Kline Student Heritage Award – Undergraduate Category: • Oscar Ignacio Jimenez from Brigham Young University for “Gather” Haskell Wexler Student Documentary Award: • Jazleana Jones from Florida State University for “King, Charles” “After watching the nominees’ work, it’s exciting to see how the next generation of filmmakers visually interprets scripts for the screen,” says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. “Our winners took a genuine approach to telling stories that evoked a range of emotions, impressing the jury of ASC members. Their mastery of the art and craft of cinematography is inspiring and bodes well for the future of entertainment.” Designed to encourage and support a new generation, the annual ASC Student Heritage Awards also celebrate the memory of an ASC member. This year’s Undergraduate and Graduate Award was named in honor of Oscar®-nominee Richard H. Kline, ASC (“Camelot,” “King Kong”). The Documentary category is dedicated to multi Oscar®-winner Haskell Wexler, ASC (“Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” “Bound for Glory”). Numerous past ASC Student Heritage Awardees have gone on to successful careers in filmmaking and several are now ASC members themselves, including Nelson Cragg, Masanobu Takayanagi, and Lisa Wiegand. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com, and follow them on Instagram (@the_asc), or join American Cinematographer on Facebook, Twitter (@AmericanCine), and Instagram (@american_cinematographer).
  2. Hi everyone, I have recently watched The Love Witch which was shot by David Mullen, ASC. My wife and I absolutely loved the film. On Wikipedia the movie is described as a "comedy horror film" and a "playful tribute to 1960s horror and Technicolor film". My question is: Can this movie be described as a Giallo film? If so, why or why not? The film was shot in "standard 4-perf 35mm 1.85 on an Arricam ST and plan on a photochemical finish, and then a transfer to digital from a timed IP". I would love to discuss the approach of shooting a "giallo" film digitally from pre- to post-production / how different the approach/results would have been in this case (The Love Witch). For example: The use of color (using tungsten and gels vs. RGB LED | speed vs. cost. vs. quality of light etc.) hard-light style with digital sensors (which I don't see that often anymore, but I might be wrong) production design, HMU, costumes in-camera effects (like kaleidoscope lens and gels in front of the lens) filters, mirrors, lenses and more... P.S. David, I loved reading you creating a red vignette by cutting out an oval in a red party gel and taping it to the matte box. It takes years to build such a solid foundation of knowledge, experience, and confidence to know how to achieve certain results. Are there any more photos or lighting breakdowns from The Love Witch you would be willing to share with us? Thank you David for sharing so much knowledge and for creating such beautiful art. I am looking forward to grow and learn more about cinematography from you and other masters of cinematography. Here a a few links I found about the film (very interesting read): https://ascmag.com/podcasts/the-love-witch-m-david-mullen-asc https://ascmag.com/articles/the-magic-of-hard-lighting-for-the-love-witch https://nofilmschool.com/2016/11/the-love-witch-anna-biller-interview
  3. Leica Camera has created a fitting tribute to the world of cinema with the new release of the Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition”, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the American Society of Cinematographers. Comprised of a Leica M10-P camera and a Leica Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. lens, the memorable set offers two specially tailored Cine Look modes built into the camera’s software that make it a focused professional tool for cinematographers and filmmakers. The set also includes a Leica Visoflex electronic viewfinder and a Leica M-PL-Mount Adapter that allows the use of almost all PL mount cine lenses available on the market. In collaboration with some of the world’s most influential cinematographers and members of the ASC, Leica has developed the new Cine Look feature, which provides directors an exceptional visual experience. The “ASC Cine Classic” mode simulates a classic, analog 35mm motion-picture film look, while the “ASC Contemporary” mode delivers the current digital style of contemporary movies. Additionally, aspect ratios that are used in cinematography can also be selected from the camera’s menu. Once activated, the selected aspect ratio is displayed as a bright-line frame in Live View mode. The Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition” offers cinematographers and directors the freedom to view and assess scenes with any desired lens before filming even begins. Founded in 1919, the American Society of Cinematographers is the world’s longest-standing artistic, technical and professional organization dedicated to the advancement of cinematography. Just like Leica, this extraordinary society has influenced and shaped how people of all cultures see the world for more than 100 years. This limited-edition release is a modern take on Oskar Barnack’s original vision of the “Ur-Leica” prototype camera as an aid to cinematography, now reiterated in the unique design of the Leica M10-P ‘ASC 100 Edition’. Reduced simply to the essentials, blacked-out engravings on its black chrome surface accentuates the camera’s minimalistic feel which is further emphasized with the body leathering, similar to that of the Leica SL. The gold-colored anodized finish of the Leica Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. lens reinterprets the brass lens of the original “Ur-Leica” in a contemporary way. The unique aesthetic of the Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition” is also complemented by the ASC logo on the top plate. The combination of the included electronic viewfinder, M-PL-Mount Adapter, Cine Look pre-sets and aspect ratio options enables the use of the camera as a director’s viewfinder, making it an extraordinarily versatile and useful tool for filmmakers. And together with the Leica FOTOS App, location scouting can be made much easier, as results can be shared and discussed immediately with everyone involved in the filming project. The Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition” will be available in autumn 2019.
  4. Hey everyone, so I just looked on the ASC site and noticed they offer a masterclass. Has anyone taken this class before? Any thoughts. Thanks,
  5. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has chosen two honorees to be feted for their body of work at the 33rd ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement. Robert Richardson, ASC will receive the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award, and Jeff Jur, ASC will be bestowed the org’s Career Achievement in Television Award. The presentations will be made at the annual ASC Awards gala on February 9, 2019, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. The event will also pay tribute to the society’s centennial in 2019. ASC President Kees van Oostrum notes, “Celebrating the accomplishments of exceptionally talented cinematographers like Bob Richardson for his innovative approach to feature films, and Jeff Jur for his brilliant interpretations in the world of television drama, is especially important in today’s day and age of cinematography. As we celebrate our 100th anniversary, I cannot imagine better role models, as both have inspired us, and their work continues to embolden the next generation of cinematographers.” Richardson’s extensive career has spanned nearly four decades and counting. Along the way, he has garnered three Academy Awards® for his cinematography on Hugo (2012), The Aviator (2005), and JFK (1992), in addition to six Oscar® nominations (The Hateful Eight, Django Unchained, Inglourious Basterds, Snow Falling on Cedars, Born on the Fourth of July, Platoon) and four BAFTAs (Hugo, Inglourious Basterds, The Aviator, Platoon). He has worked alongside some of the most renowned director’s in cinema, including Oliver Stone, Martin Scorsese, and Quentin Tarantino. His most recent film is A Private War, in select theaters now, with Once Upon a Time in Hollywood slated for release next year. Richardson began shooting documentaries in the 1980s. His photography on Crossfire for an English TV station caught the eye of Stone, who enlisted Richardson for Salvador. That led to Platoon, and the beginning of a prolific credit list that includes Wall Street, The Doors, A Few Good Men, Natural Born Killers, Casino, Nixon, The Horse Whisperer, both Kill Bill movies, The Good Shepherd, Eat Pray Love, and Live by Night, among others. Born in Massachusetts, Richardson fell in love with movies and studied at the Rhode Island School of Design, before advancing to the American Film Institute in the late 1970s. He apprenticed with such legendary cinematographers as Sven Nykvist, ASC, FSF and Nestor Almendros, ASC, and continues to amass feature and documentary credits, demonstrating amazing artistry in everything he shoots. Jur has received numerous accolades for his wide range of television credits. He collected Emmy® Awards for his artistry on HBO’s Carnivale (2004) and for HBO’s Bessie (2016), in addition to another nomination for Carnivale in 2005. Jur’s work has also been recognized by the ASC, having won Outstanding Achievement Awards for the Showtime movie Last Call (2003) and Carnivale (2004), and earning nominations for Carnivale (2006), ABC’s Flashforward (2010), and Bessie. Jur studied film at Columbia College in Chicago. After school, he stayed in Chicago, where he was a gaffer and assistant cameraman on commercials, industrial films and documentaries. He photographed a number of American Playhouse telefilms, including Any Friend of Nicholas Nickleby Is a Friend of Mine from 1980 to 1984. In between TV projects, he went on to shoot feature films, such as Dirty Dancing, The Big Picture, The Last Seduction, How Stella Got Her Groove Back, Panic, Joy Ride, and My Big Fat Greek Wedding, among others. Jur’s prolific resume includes episodes of the series Invasion (ABC), Dirty Sexy Money (ABC), Perception (TNT), Dexter (Showtime), Resurrection (ABC), Halt & Catch Fire (AMC), Colony (USA), The Catch (ABC), Westworld (HBO), Lodge 49 (AMC), and How to Get Away With Murder (ABC). He also has an impressive list of television movies from Running Mates (HBO), Zooman (Showtime), Murder: Live! (NBC), and First Time Felon (HBO), to Alone (Showtime), On Thin Ice (Lifetime), and Reconstruction (NBC). For information regarding the 33rd ASC Awards, visit www.theasc.com or call 323-969-4333.
  6. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) named the 2018 Student Heritage Award winners during a ceremony at the organization’s clubhouse in Hollywood on October 13. Three student filmmakers were honored for demonstrating exceptional abilities in cinematography based on their submitted work. The competition is designed to showcase rising talent and inspire the next generation of filmmakers. The 2018 winners are: ASC Sol Negrin Student Heritage Award – Graduate Category: Steven Breckon for A Place to Stay, American Film Institute (AFI) ASC Gerald Hirschfield Student Heritage Award – Undergraduate Category: Matthew Hayward for The Latent Image, Columbia College Chicago ASC Haskell Wexler Student Documentary Award: Alejandro Cortes Sanchez for Adrift, School of Visual Arts NYC A panel of ASC members judged the entries, and the winners were selected from 13 nominees. “The future of cinematography promises to be exciting, especially after seeing the level of work coming from this year’s submissions,” says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. “The skill and artistry of the next generation should be an inspiration to all of us who create and capture images every day.” The ASC Student Heritage Awards are unique, as they also celebrate the memory of revered cinematographers and are re-named for esteemed ASC members each year. Negrin was nominated for five Emmy Awards — three for his work on the detective drama Kojak, one for the telefilm The Last Tenant, and one for an episode of the series Baker’s Dozen. His cinematography in television commercials also earned four Clio Awards. Negrin received the ASC Presidents Award in 2010 in recognition of not only his expertise behind the camera, but for being an ambassador of the art and craft of cinematography. Hirschfeld was honored with the ASC Presidents Award in 2007. His reputation for being a precise, exacting perfectionist led to his first major feature assignment, shooting the Cold War drama Fail-Safe for director Sidney Lumet. He would go on to shoot some 40 feature films, including The Incident, Goodbye Columbus, Cotton Comes to Harlem, Diary of a Mad Housewife, Young Frankenstein, Two Minute Warning, The World’s Greatest Lover, The Bell Jar, Neighbors, My Favorite Year and To Be or Not to Be. Wexler began his career shooting documentaries and remained a passionate documentarian throughout his career. He earned an Academy Award® in 1966 for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and a second Oscar® in 1976 for Bound for Glory. He also received nominations for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (shared with Bill Butler, ASC), Matewan and Blaze. In 1969, Wexler wrote, directed and shot Medium Cool, which is studied by film students worldwide for its cinéma vérité style. In 1992, he was honored with the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award. Many ASC Student Heritage Award winners have gone on to have successful careers in filmmaking, and several have been invited to be ASC members themselves. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com, and follow them on Instagram (@the_asc), or join American Cinematographer on Facebook, Twitter (@AmericanCine), and Instagram (@american_cinematographer). The 33rd Annual ASC Awards take place February 9, 2019. The student winners will be commemorated during the gala as well.
  7. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is now taking submissions for the television competition of its 33rd Annual ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography. The event, which will also salute the organization’s 100th anniversary, takes place February 9, 2019, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland, and winners will be announced in all categories. Three categories comprise the TV awards: • Episode of a Television Series – Commercial (half hour and one hour) • Episode of a Television Series – Non-Commercial (half hour and one hour) • Motion Picture, Miniseries, or Pilot Made for TV The deadline to enter is November 5 by 5 p.m. (PT). To qualify, shows must have a premiere broadcast date in the United States between November 1, 2017, and October 31, 2018. Entry forms can be downloaded at here on the ASC website. In addition to the TV awards, the ASC gala in February will recognize the year’s best feature film cinematography, as well as lifetime honorees. For a complete timeline of the 33rd ASC Awards, visit this link.
  8. Dear Readers, Available and offering 21/22 years of American Cinematographer magazine, complete in 2 boxes. Spanning one of the most exciting periods in recent cinematographic history: describing the transition from analog to full digital (almost). Available in my hometown Haarlem, The Netherlands. ++31620845845 bart[at]bartvanbroekhoven.com
  9. Contenders for the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) 2018 Student Heritage Awards have been unveiled today by the organization. Designed to inspire the next generation, the awards recognize graduate, undergraduate and documentary cinematography students for their exceptional work. The 13 nominees this year hail from 10 universities nationwide, and winners will be announced October 13. The ASC Student Heritage Awards also celebrate the memory of an exceptional cinematographer and are re-named each year in honor of esteemed ASC members. This year’s Undergraduate Award is named in honor of Gerald Hirschfeld, ASC and the Graduate Award honors Sol Negrin, ASC. The Documentary category is dedicated to Haskell Wexler, ASC. Finalists for this year’s student awards are: ASC Sol Negrin, ASC Student Heritage Award – Graduate Category: • Brody Anderson for Drawn Curtains, Chapman University – Dodge College • Steven Breckon for A Place to Stay, American Film Institute (AFI) • Andres Gallegos for Shoe Shiner, San Francisco State University • Yair Halper for Sauna, American Film Institute (AFI) • Heyjin Jun for Difficult People, University of Southern California (USC) School of Cinematic Arts ASC Gerald Hirschfield, ASC Student Heritage Award – Undergraduate Category: • Jack Craymer for Sonora, Chapman University – Dodge College • Matthew Hayward for The Latent Image, Columbia College Chicago • Grace Marrero for The Girl and the Bird, Florida State University (FSU) College of Motion Picture Arts • Simms Wright for Sodium Vapor Nights, University of North Carolina (UNC) School of the Arts ASC Haskell Wexler Student Documentary Award: • Alejandro Cortes Sanchez for Adrift, School of Visual Arts NYC • Rachel Lattin for Monumental, Chapman University – Dodge College • Minagi Tanaka for She Comes at Night, State University of New York at New Paltz • Xinzhong Zhao for Francis Ford Coppola’s Live Cinema, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Negrin was nominated for five Emmy Awards — three for his work on the detective drama Kojak, one for the telefilm The Last Tenant, and one for an episode of the series Baker’s Dozen. His cinematography in television commercials also earned four Clio Awards. Negrin received the ASC Presidents Award in 2010 in recognition of not only his expertise behind the camera, but for being an ambassador of the art and craft of cinematography. In 2007, Hirschfeld was honored with the ASC Presidents Award. His reputation for being a precise, exacting perfectionist led to his first major feature assignment, shooting the Cold War drama Fail-Safe for director Sidney Lumet. He would go on to shoot some 40 feature films, including The Incident, Goodbye Columbus, Cotton Comes to Harlem, Diary of a Mad Housewife, Young Frankenstein, Two Minute Warning, The World’s Greatest Lover, The Bell Jar, Neighbors, My Favorite Year and To Be or Not to Be. Wexler began his career shooting documentaries and remained a passionate documentarian throughout his career. He earned an Academy Award® in 1966 for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and a second Oscar® in 1976 for Bound for Glory. He also received nominations for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (shared with Bill Butler, ASC), Matewan and Blaze. In 1969, Wexler wrote, directed and shot Medium Cool, which is studied by film students worldwide for its cinéma vérité style. In 1992, he was honored with the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award. Many ASC Student Heritage Award winners have gone on to have successful careers in filmmaking, and several have been invited to be ASC members themselves. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com, and follow them on Instagram (@the_asc), or join American Cinematographer on Facebook, Twitter (@AmericanCine), and Instagram (@american_cineamtographer).
  10. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has re-elected Kees van Oostrum as president. Van Oostrum will serve his third consecutive term. The ASC Board also named its roster of officers for 2018-2019, including Bill Bennett, John Simmons and Cynthia Pusheck as vice presidents; Levie Isaacks as treasurer; David Darby as secretary; and Isidore Mankofsky as sergeant-at-arms. “During this past year at the ASC, we have been steadfastly focused on educational events, international outreach, and efforts to promote diversity and inclusion,” notes van Oostrum. “These all support our mission of loyalty, progress and artistry. As we look ahead, we plan to usher in the 100th anniversary of the ASC in a way that commemorates our heritage and positions our members to maintain a leadership role in the evolution of the art and craft of image making.” Van Oostrum initiated and chairs the ASC Master Class program, which has expanded to locations worldwide under his presidency. The Master Classes take place several times a year and are taught exclusively by ASC members. It is designed for cinematographers with an intermediate-to-advanced skill set, and incorporates practical, hands-on demonstrations of lighting and camera techniques with essential instruction in current workflow practices. The ASC Vision Committee, founded during van Oostrum’s first term, continues to organize successful symposiums that encourage diversity and inclusion on camera crews, and also offers networking opportunities. The most recent was a standing-room-only event that explored practical and progressive ideas for changing the face of the industry. The Society will continue to host more of these activities during the coming years. Van Oostrum has earned two Primetime Emmy® nominations for his work on the telefilms Miss Rose White and Return to Lonesome Dove. His peers chose the latter for a 1994 ASC Outstanding Achievement Award. Additional ASC Award nominations for his television credits came for The Burden of Proof, Medusa’s Child, and Spartacus. He also shot the Emmy®-winning documentary The Last Chance. A native of Amsterdam, van Oostrum studied at the Dutch Film Academy with an emphasis on both cinematography and directing, and went on to earn a scholarship sponsored by the Dutch government, which enabled him to enroll the American Film Institute (AFI). Van Oostrum broke into the industry shooting television documentaries for several years. He has subsequently compiled a wide range of some 80-plus credits, including movies for television and the cinema, such as Gettysburg and Gods and Generals, and occasional documentaries. He recently wrapped the final season of TV series The Fosters. The 2018-2019 Board who voted in this election include: John Bailey, Paul Cameron, Russell Carpenter, Curtis Clark, Dean Cundey, George Spiro Dibie, Stephen Lighthill, Lowell Peterson, Roberto Schaefer, John Toll, and Amelia Vincent. Alternate Board members are Karl-Walter Lindenlaub, Stephen Burum, David Darby, Charlie Lieberman, and Eric Steelberg. The ASC has over 20 committees driving the organization’s initiatives, such as the award-winning Motion Imaging Technology Council (MITC), and the Educational and Outreach committee. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com.
  11. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) will present “Changing the Face of the Industry” on April 21, a daylong event designed to advocate for inclusion and diversity in the industry. The symposium, which takes place at the ASC clubhouse in Hollywood, will kick off with a keynote from Dr. Stacy Smith, associate professor at the USC Annenberg School of Communication and founder/director of the Annenberg Inclusion Initiative. Two subsequent panels will look at hiring statistics and mandates, and explore ideas for cultivating more diverse crews on set. “Changing the Face of the Industry” is an initiative of the ASC Vision Committee, which was formed in January 2016 with the mission to actively support those who face more hurdles in this industry. The committee organizes inspirational events and offers scholarships alongside networking opportunities, and is headed by co-chairs John Simmons, ASC and Cynthia Pusheck, ASC. “By bringing filmmakers together, we hope to create a network that expands opportunities, raise awareness of the exceptional talent for hire, and give underrepresented crewmembers the opportunity to meet cinematographers who may one day recruit them,” notes Pusheck. Dr. Smith’s groundbreaking research at the Annenberg Inclusion Initiative (AII) examines inclusion of gender, race/ethnicity, the LGBT community, people with disabilities and mental health in storytelling across film, TV and digital platforms. The Initiative releases analyses of top-grossing films (on screen, behind the camera, executive ranks), popular music (artists, songwriters, producers), and impediments facing women and individuals from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups in the director's chair. She has authored over 100 articles, book chapters and reports, and is covered regularly in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, CBS This Morning, NPR, and many others. Dr. Smith crafts compelling and innovative solutions to entertainment inequality. She introduced the Inclusion Rider to the entertainment industry via her 2016 TED talk and a 2014 opinion piece in The Hollywood Reporter. Frances McDormand popularized the phrase on stage at the 2018 Academy Awards®. In 2015, LA Weekly named Dr. Smith the most influential person in Los Angeles. Dr. Smith and AII have partnered with many organizations over the years, such as Universal Music Group, Google, The Harnisch Foundation, Clif Bar, Humana, Sony Pictures Entertainment, The Annenberg Foundation, and more. “We’re hopeful this event encourages camera department heads to continually evolve their mindset and practices for inclusivity,” Simmons adds. Panelists are expected to include (based on availability): • Xiomara Comrie - Local 600, National Diversity Officer & Lead Western Region Business Rep • Rebecca Rhine - Local 600, National Executive Director • Tema Staig - Women in Media, Executive Director • Alan Caso, ASC (Hawaii Five-O, Dexter) • Sarah Caplan, producer (Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, Brothers & Sisters) • Donald A. Morgan, ASC (Last Man Standing, The Ranch) • John Simmons, ASC (Roseanne) • Bradford Young, ASC (Solo: A Star Wars Story, Arrival) ASC President Kees van Oostrum says, “Finding and hiring craftspeople that reflect our diverse world at large is a necessity of inclusion. By hosting a day of networking and discussion, we hope to initiate solutions to make that easier and broaden people’s address books, so they have the contacts they need to affect change.” To register to attend the event, email ASCVision@theasc.com.
  12. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has named Eric Rodli as executive director, effective immediately. In his new role, Rodli will be responsible for driving initiatives that uphold the mission of the organization – to advance the art and science of cinematography – and creating a supportive community for its members. Rodli, an ASC associate member since 2001, has served six years as co-chair of the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council’s Cinema Display Committee, dedicated to exploring new technologies and providing guidance on enhancing the moviegoing experience in service to the filmmaker’s creative intent. He co-authored the committee’s 2016 white paper, “Cinema Display Evaluation Plan and Test Protocol,” which explores the key image quality parameters of dynamic range, color space and overall luminance, as well as suggesting testing parameters. Rodli also has been a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Task Force on Content Preservation, and has participated in numerous industry panels ranging on topics from digital media distribution to projection. “We are thrilled to have someone of Eric’s caliber propelling the vision of our organization to new levels,” says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. “As the ASC nears its 100th anniversary, it’s important that we build on the legacy of our founders and continue to support the membership creatively, as well as encourage and educate the next generation of cinematographers. Eric has both the industry and creative relationships to augment our efforts.” Rodli’s career includes extensive experience as an executive in the entertainment technology industry with management roles in start-ups and large corporations. He served as president at Iwerks Entertainment, Bexel and Kodak’s motion picture film division, and most recently as CFO of BeBop Technologies. Rodli has worked on numerous creative and technical initiatives across multiple industry sectors, dating back to pioneering the use of the first generation of HD cameras, as well as 3D projection, digital streaming technology, and laser projection systems. His strategic and hands-on experience in the imaging chain has fueled his belief that technology should serve the artist. “I’m honored to be on board at the ASC to cultivate the progress of artists whom I admire for their outstanding contributions to so many indelible images,” says Rodli. “Throughout my career, I’ve been fortunate to work with many cinematographers in various capacities and am constantly awestruck by their impactful aptitude, techniques and creativity. I look forward to working with the board and advocating for the members.” Focused on education, the ASC hosts many programs, including the ASC Master Classes, Student Heritage Awards, Coffee and Conversation Q&As with cinematographers, and panel discussions by the Education and Outreach Committee. The award-winning efforts of the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council (MITC) since 2003 have shaped the standards and practices of cinematography for digital workflows, with the group and its committees working closely with the Academy’s Sci-Tech Council and SMPTE. The ASC Vision Committee also holds events to foster diversity and equality on camera crews.
  13. Winners Hail from AFI, LMU and USC LOS ANGELES (October 16, 2017) – The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) announced their annual Student Heritage Award winners Saturday night during a presentation at the organization’s clubhouse in Hollywood. Three student filmmakers were singled out for demonstrating exceptional abilities in cinematography. The competition is designed to highlight the work of emerging talent, and inspire the next generation of filmmakers. The 2017 winners are: ASC Andrew Lesnie Student Heritage Award, Graduate Category Favienne Howsepian from the American Film Institute (AFI) for “Snowplow” ASC Andrew Lesnie Student Heritage Award, Undergraduate Category Logan Fulton from Loyola Marymount University (LMU) for “Widow” ASC Haskell Wexler Student Award, Documentary Category Connor Ellmann from University of Southern California (USC) for “Forever Home” A panel of ASC members judged the entries, and the winners were selected from 13 nominees. “The level of cinematography we see coming from students these days seems to get more exciting and visually challenging each year,” says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. “It’s a testament to the quality and commitment of the younger generation of cinematographers, and promises an exciting future.” The ASC student awards are named in honor of Lesnie and Wexler, revered members of the organization. Lesnie won an Oscar® for best cinematography for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. His work on Doing Time for Patsy Cline earned an ACS Award of Distinction, as well as won the Australian Film Institute and The Australian Film Critics’ awards for best cinematography. He also won the ACS Cinematographer of the Year Award twice, for You Seng and Babe. Wexler earned Academy Awards® for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Bound for Glory, and received additional nominations for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (shared with Bill Butler, ASC), Matewan and Blaze. Wexler wrote, directed and shot Medium Cool, which is studied by film students worldwide for its cinéma vérité style. In 1992, he was honored with the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award. The ASC Student Awards were inaugurated in 1999, with the Documentary category added in 2012. Past winners include Lisa Wiegand, ASC; Lukas Ettlin; Masanobu Takayanagi, ASC; Nelson Cragg; and Benji Bakshi, among many others who have become directors of photography or carved out careers in the filmmaking industry.
  14. Organization to Laud Russell Carpenter, Russell Boyd, Alan Caso and Stephen Lighthill at Annual Gala LOS ANGELES (October 5, 2017) – In recognition of their special contributions to the art of cinematography, the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has named four honorees who will be feted at the 32nd ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement. Russell Carpenter, ASC will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award; Russell Boyd, ASC, ACS will earn the org’s International Award; Alan Caso, ASC will be bestowed the Career Achievement in Television Award; and Stephen Lighthill, ASC will take home the Presidents Award. The presentations will be made at the annual ASC awards gala on February 17, 2018, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. “These artists have accomplished a compelling array of visuals throughout their careers, reaching levels of excellence that inspire cinematographers around the world,” says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. “Not only have they excelled in the art and craft of cinematography but demonstrated leadership and mentorship in their daily work on and off the set.” Carpenter received an Academy Award® for his ground-breaking work on James Cameron’s Titanic (1997), which took home a total of 11 Oscars®. The film also earned best cinematography awards for Carpenter from the ASC and Chicago Film Critics. The cinematographer began his career shooting documentaries and educational films. His breakthrough film, The Lawnmower Man (1992), demonstrated pioneering computer graphics in filmmaking. He’s gone on to photograph a range of genre films including Hard Target, True Lies, The Indian in the Cupboard, The Negotiator, Charlie’s Angels, Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle, Parched, Awake and 21, among others. Carpenter also shoots commercials, creating compelling visuals for such brands as Lexus, AT&T and Microsoft. Most recently, he contributed his cinematographic talents to Peyton Reed’s Ant-Man, and D.J. Caruso’s xXx: Return of Xander Cage. Carpenter is currently shooting the Disney picture, Nicole, with director Marc Lawrence before moving on to the Avatar sequels for Cameron. Boyd is an Oscar® winner for his compelling visuals on Peter Weir’s Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003). He reigns from a small town in Victoria, Australia, where he aspired to be a press photographer but got his start at a weekly Melbourne news program, performing a variety of tasks. After shooting numerous commercials for a production company in Sydney, Boyd transitioned to narrative filmmaking, working with Weir several times during the early days of his career. In addition to Master and Commander, the cinematographer and director have collaborated on Picnic at Hanging Rock, The Last Wave, Gallipoli, The Year of Living Dangerously, and The Way Back. Boyd’s credits also include a wide range of feature and television projects, including Tender Mercies, A Soldier’s Story, Cobb, Tin Cup, Doctor Doolittle, and Ghost Rider. Caso has compiled over 50 television credits, earning two Emmy® nominations for his work on Six Feet Under (2001), as well as nods for Into the West (2005) and George Wallace (1997). The latter also took home an ASC Award, with additional nominations bestowed by the organization for Frankenstein (2004) and Into the West. Caso’s cinematographic contributions to television have made an impact on the annals of the small screen, including The Good Old Boys, Tour of Duty, Blackout Effect, Widows, Running Mates, Master Spy: The Robert Hanssen Story, Blackbeard, Big Love, Dexter, The Americans (pilot), and Hawaii Five-O. His feature credits include First Sunday, Reindeer Games, Muppets From Space, Top of the World and Ed. He is currently directing photography on the TV series For the People for ABC, and recently shot the upcoming pilot for NBC’s Reverie. Lighthill began his career shooting network news and documentaries, including contributions to Oscar®-nominated documentary Berkeley in the ‘60s, Gimme Shelter, and CBS’ 60 Minutes. In recent years, he returned to documentaries with Boffo! Tinseltown's Bombs and Blockbusters, and The Alzheimer's Project: Caregivers. Lighthill’s credits also include independent features and television, such as PBS’ Over-Under Sideways-Down, Hot Summer Winds, Shimmer, HBO’s Vietnam War Story, Earth 2 for NBC, and Nash Bridges for CBS. His contributions to the industry include many years on the ASC Board of Governors, serving as president from 2012–2013, and the National Executive Board of the International Cinematographers Guild (ICG). In 2010, he received the Deluxe Bud Stone Award for Outstanding Educational Contributions to the Art and Craft of Cinematography from the ICG, and the 2010 SMPTE Kodak Educational Award for outstanding contributions in film production education. He is also a regular jury member at the Camerimage cinematography festival in Poland. Lighthill is currently the Senior Filmmaker in Residence: Cinematography at the American Film Institute (AFI) Conservatory. For information regarding the 32nd ASC Awards, visit www.theasc.com or call 323-969-4333.
  15. Hello all, So as I talk to my friends and coworkers who are DPs and have talked to more ASC members about their beginnings, one common trait I have come across is that they have a mentor. Some have been taken under the mentor's wings by either the MENTOR asking them or vice versa. I want to hear from any other DPs and their experience with this? I was talking to a Script Supervisor on set recently and she was telling me that she emailed Script Supervisors that she hasn't even met and some have responded (union members) answering her questions and offered her to learn from them (as in to additionally come on set). Are there any experiences like this from any of you that you can share? What are some different ways to obtain and seek a mentor without coming off "forcefully" or "desperate" to get into the business? Thank you!
  16. Organization Sets 2018 Date for Annual Awards Gala The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has opened its call for entries in the television categories for the 32nd Annual ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography, which will be held February 17, 2018, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. The ASC is now accepting submissions in three categories: (1) Episode of a Television Series – Commercial; (2) Episode of a Television Series – Non-Commercial; and (3) Motion Picture, Miniseries, or Pilot Made for TV. The deadline to enter is November 1 by 5 p.m. (PT). To qualify for the ASC TV Awards, shows must have a premiere broadcast date in the United States between November 1, 2016, and October 31, 2017. Entry forms can be downloaded on the ASC website at www.theasc.com/asc/awards/entry-forms. Winners in the television categories at the 31st ASC Awards included Fabian Wagner, ASC, BSC for Game of Thrones, Tod Campbell for Mr. Robot, and Igor Martinovic for The Night Of. In addition to the TV awards, the ASC gala in February will also honor excellence in feature film cinematography, and recognize cinematographers and filmmakers for their contributions to the art and craft of filmmaking throughout their career. For a complete timeline of the 32nd ASC Awards, visit www.theasc.com/asc/awards/dates-deadlines.
  17. The ASC Technology Committee has been renamed the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council. Established in 2003, the Committee has helped organize efforts to study and assess subjects ranging from digital cameras and lens optics to motion imaging workflows, advanced color management, virtual production techniques digital archiving and more recently virtual reality. “During our past 14 years of proactive motion picture and TV industry engagement, the ASC Technology Committee has played a significant leadership role in guiding the evolution and development of key motion imaging technologies to better support our filmmaking art form,” notes Chairman Curtis Clark, ASC. “Many of our industry partners and supporters, along with users of our technologies, have suggested that the Committee’s name does not sufficiently convey the scope and influence that our activities have had on important motion imaging technology developments,” he continues. “In response to that input and after careful consideration, we have decided to change the Committee’s name to the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council (MITC) — or ‘My Tech.’ We believe this better represents the expanded scope of the work we are doing and our widely recognized role as industry leaders — influencing the advancement of motion imaging technologies in ways that best serve the creative interests of filmmakers while emphasizing the cinematographer’s contribution to the art form.” Clark adds, “Our Subcommittees will now be designated Committees of the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council. We will continue to encourage our Committees to work in a coordinated manner, combining their expertise on topics of wide interest and concern, including ACES, HDR, digital motion picture camera developments, look management, virtual production techniques, lens developments, DI, motion imaging workflows, projection and display technologies, archiving, as well as advanced imaging.” MITC’s latest reports on a variety of technological issues will be published on in the September issue of the SMPTE Motion Imaging Journal as part of the 2017 SMPTE Progress Report. For a full roster of ASC MITC Committees, visit: www.theasc.com/asc/committees/ascmitc
  18. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has re-appointed Kees van Oostrum to a second term as president of the organization, based on votes at last night’s Board of Governors meeting. The ASC Board also elected its officers for the 2017-2018 term, including: Bill Bennett, John Simmons and Cynthia Pusheck as vice presidents; Levie Isaacks as treasurer; David Darby as secretary; and Isidore Mankofsky as sergeant-at-arms. “As an organization, we are focused on education, international outreach, diversity and preservation of our heritage,” van Oostrum says. “Over the past year, we expanded our Master Class program internationally to Toronto and China. We launched a Chinese version of American Cinematographer magazine. We are preparing for a third International Cinematography Summit, which sees attendees from several other societies around the world. And our Vision Committee has many initiatives planned after presenting two very successful ‘Day of Inspiration’ events in Los Angeles and New York, which were designed to inspire female cinematographers and crewmembers.” The 2017-2018 ASC Regular Board members include: Paul Cameron, Russell Carpenter, Curtis Clark, Richard Crudo, George Spiro Dibie, Fred Elmes, Victor J. Kemper, Stephen Lighthill, Karl-Walter Lindenlaub, Woody Omens, Robert Primes, Cynthia Pusheck, John Simmons, John Toll, and Amy Vincent. Roberto Schaefer, Dean Cundey, Lowell Peterson, Steven Fierberg, and Stephen Burum are Alternate Board members. Van Oostrum is also the chairman and originator of the renowned ASC Master Classes, which take place several times a year due to sell-out enrollment. Inaugurated in 2013, the Master Classes are taught exclusively by ASC members. It is designed for cinematographers with an intermediate-to-advanced skill set, and incorporates practical, hands-on demonstrations of lighting and camera techniques with essential instruction in current workflow practices. The ASC’s ongoing educational programs consist of the Student Heritage Awards, Coffee and Conversation Q&As with cinematographers, panel discussions by the Education and Outreach Committee, Friends of the ASC membership, and several other committee initiatives. Most notable are the award-winning efforts of the ASC Technology Committee, which has proven unique in its ability to shape the standards and practices of cinematography for digital workflows. The Committee works closely with the Academy’s Sci-Tech Council, and is regularly featured in the SMPTE Journal. Van Oostrum has earned two Primetime Emmy® nominations for his work on the telefilms Miss Rose White and Return to Lonesome Dove. His peers chose the latter for a 1994 ASC Outstanding Achievement Award. Additional ASC Award nominations for his television credits came for The Burden of Proof, Medusa’s Child, and Spartacus. He also shot the Emmy®-winning documentary The Last Chance. Currently, he serves as director of photography on The Fosters which airs on Freeform. A native of Amsterdam, van Oostrum studied at the Dutch Film Academy with an emphasis on both cinematography and directing, and went on to earn a scholarship sponsored by the Dutch government, which enabled him to enroll the American Film Institute (AFI). Van Oostrum broke into the industry shooting television documentaries for several years. He has subsequently compiled a wide range of some 80-plus credits, including movies for television and the cinema, such as Gettysburg and Gods and Generals, and occasional documentaries. ASC was founded in 1919. There are 370-plus active members today who have national roots in some 20 countries. There are also 200 associate members from ancillary segments of the industry. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com, or join American Cinematographer on Facebook, Twitter (@AmericanCine) and Instagram (@the_asc).
  19. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is expanding its presence in the Asia Pacific region with the launch of an International Masterclass in Beijing and the availability of the organization’s magazine, American Cinematographer, in Chinese. In collaboration with 107CINE.com, the first Chinese edition of American Cinematographer magazine was posted online April 1, featuring translated articles from the March 2017 print issue. The next edition will contain select articles from both the April and May issues of the magazine. 107CINE reports that the Chinese filmmaking community has responded with great enthusiasm; within the first 10 days, nearly 2,500 website visitors signed up to read the publication. Concurrently with the premiere copy of the Chinese edition of the magazine, the organization is holding its first ASC Masterclasses in Beijing. Running April 10-13 and April 16-19 in partnership with ARRI, the classes are being led by ASC member instructors, including Bill Bennett, Karl-Walter Lindenlaub, Fred Elmes, Theo van de Sande, Steven Fierberg and Sam Nicholson. They will also present two forums with the Beijing Film Academy and the Beijing International Film Festival. The ASC Masterclasses build on the organization’s mission to educate the next generation of filmmakers. Classes include instruction on a variety of topics such as lighting, shooting for live action, animation and visual effects, and color grading. The next Masterclass will be held in Los Angeles at the historic ASC Clubhouse in May. ASC President Kees van Oostrum said, “Over the past years, the ASC has increased its global outreach. This mission began in earnest with our first International Cinematographers Summit in 2011 and has continued to grow significantly as evidenced by our increased participation at Camerimage, IMAGO, and the second ASC International Summit, which we hosted in Los Angeles this past June. We have also seen members travel to Dubai, Qatar, Munich, Amsterdam and Toronto in the past six months as representatives of the ASC. I am excited to announce that we are now extending that global outreach to China.” For more information, visit www.theasc.com. To read the Chinese issue of American Cinematographer, visit https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4l_Tu2kQOTDRVFVOFR0YlJ3ckU/view Or to learn more, watch the promo video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RY0qFsx6gtA
  20. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is exhibiting still photographs by nine of its members at the historic ASC clubhouse in Hollywood. Curated by David Fahey of Fahey/Klein Gallery, the temporary exhibit runs through March 31. The gallery is open to the public by appointment during weekdays from 11:00 am – 4:00 pm. Photographs on display were shot by some of the world’s top cinematographers including, Russell Carpenter, James Chressanthis, David Darby, Stephen Goldblatt, Jacek Laskus, Phedon Papamichael, John Simmons, John Toll and Theo Van de Sande. Five photos from each of the ASC members comprise the exhibit. A limited edition of each photograph has also been printed and is available for purchase. Proceeds fund the nonprofit organization’s educational initiatives. “The ASC is passionately dedicated to advancing the art and craft of cinematography through education,” says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. “Photography not only inspires the work of directors of photography, but it has inspired many great artists throughout history. We hope that by sharing some of our members’ images we are able to encourage others to pursue the art form and foster an appreciation for the visual language.” To make an appointment, contact office@theasc.com or call (323) 969-4333.
  21. In his interview on the American Cinematographer podcast, Crescenzo Notarile ASC says when he was shooting CSI that he would do his closeups from 40 feet away using 150mm to 250mm lenses (as opposed to Gotham where he uses 21mm to 32mm). As mainly a stills photographer, I understand where he's going, most people look a lot better with longer lenses. However, the farthest I get from my still subjects is 10 or 15 feet. Forty feet away would be a whole other universe... So, in cinematography is there an advantage to shooting with such long lenses besides the flattering look and change in subject-background relationship? Does it change the actor's dynamic with the camera? What other benefits does it bestow? Thanks
  22. LOS ANGELES (December 13, 2016) - Honoring one of Hollywood's biggest icons, the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) will bestow their Board of Governors Award on director Denzel Washington on February 4, 2017, during the 31st ASC Awards at Hollywood & Highland's Ray Dolby Ballroom. The organization presents the accolade to individuals in the industry whose body of work has made significant and indelible contributions to cinema. It is the only ASC Award not given to a cinematographer, and is reserved for filmmakers who have been champions for directors of photography and the visual art form. The director made his directorial debut with Antwone Fisher (2002). His second feature, The Great Debaters, followed in 2007. Washington's current project is the critically acclaimed film Fences, written by August Wilson and based on his Pulitzer Prize-winning play, which will be released on Christmas Day. In addition to producing and directing the movie, Washington reprises his original Tony Award®-winning role alongside Viola Davis. "Denzel Washington is an amazing director and actor, and a conscious force in these challenging times," notes ASC President Kees van Oostrum. "A true artist is empowered by the era they live in, and he expresses an awareness of the world around us through his work. It is that strength of character that we honor with the ASC Governors Award." Washington has starred in over 50 films and television shows, in addition to his theater roles and directing credits. He received his first Academy Award® for the historical war drama Glory (1989) and a second for the crime thriller Training Day (2001). He began his career in New York theater productions, and rose to fame when he landed the role of Dr. Phillip Chandler on the NBC long-running hit television series St. Elsewhere. Washington's other television credits include The George McKenna Story, License to Kill and Wilma. When Washington crossed over into the world of film, he garnered critical acclaim for his portrayal of real life figures. He earned his first Oscar® nomination for Cry Freedom (1987), as South African anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko. From there, he went on to portray Muslim minister and human rights activist Malcolm X in Malcolm X (1992), boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter in The Hurricane (1999), football coach Herman Boone in Remember the Titans (2000), and drug kingpin Frank Lucas in American Gangster (2007). He also starred in Much Ado About Nothing, A Soldier's Story, Crimson Tide, Devil in a Blue Dress, and Inside Man. Washington was mostly recently seen in Antoine Fuqua's remake of The Magnificent Seven and before that, they teamed up for The Equalizer. The actor also appeared in 2 Guns and Unstoppable. Washington is a recipient of the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award, which was presented to him at the 73rd Golden Globe Awards earlier this year. He received a Golden Globe nomination yesterday for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture-Drama for Fences. Previous recipients of the ASC Board of Governors Award include Ridley Scott, Barbra Streisand, Harrison Ford, Julia Roberts, Christopher Nolan, Warren Beatty, Francis Ford Coppola, Sally Field, Morgan Freeman, Ron Howard, Sydney Pollack, Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg, among many others.
  23. LOS ANGELES (October 17, 2016) - The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) honored three student filmmakers tonight at their annual student awards presentation, held at the organization's clubhouse. The competition is designed to highlight the work of emerging talent, and inspire the next generation of filmmakers. The winners are: ASC Vilmos Zsigmond Student Heritage Award, Graduate Category Andrew Jeric from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts for Prisoner ASC Vilmos Zsigmond Student Heritage Award, Undergraduate Category Emmett Sutherland from the Art Center College of Design for Closer ASC Haskell Wexler Student Award, Documentary Category Colin F. Shepherd of the Rochester Institute of Technology for Into the Microscope A panel of prestigious ASC members judged the entries. Jeric, Sutherland and Shephard were selected from 18 nominees for demonstrating their exceptional abilities in cinematography in their submitted works. "It's exciting to see the incredible level of artistry coming out of film schools," says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. "It was difficult to choose among the large pool of talent, but these students have achieved what our members saw to be a professional level of visual storytelling. We hope to encourage them to continue on their career path in filmmaking." The ASC Student Heritage Awards are renamed annually in memory of an extraordinary ASC member. This year, the awards are dedicated to two cinematic legends: Zsigmond and Wexler. Zsigmond won an Academy Award® for Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and earned additional nominations for The Deer Hunter (1979), The River (1985) and The Black Dahlia (2007). He also won an Emmy® for shooting the HBO movie Stalin (1993). Wexler began his career shooting documentaries and remained a passionate documentarian. He earned Academy Awards for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) and Bound for Glory (1976), and also received nominations for One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (shared with Bill Butler, ASC), Matewan and Blaze. In 1969, Wexler wrote, directed and shot Medium Cool, which is studied by film students worldwide for its cinéma vérité style. The ASC Student Awards were inaugurated in 1999, with the Documentary category added in 2012. Past winners include Lisa Wiegand, ASC; Lukas Ettlin; Masanobu Takayanagi, ASC; Nelson Cragg; and Benji Bakshi, among many others who have become directors of photography or carved out careers in the filmmaking industry.
  24. Hi, I stopped shooting 4-5 years ago due to a sports injury which lead me to working in another field but now I want to start shooting again and I'm feeling a bit behind in the tech, workflow and rusty in my skills. I'm lucky enough to be visiting LA early next year & I'm looking at the ASC Masterclass. I'm concerned it's not really hands on? Is it? Isn't it? I see they're using the Alexa and going through the most current workflows etc but is it mostly learning through demonstration or are we able to get our hands on the tech, lights & set up some shots? Anyone who's done it got any reviews? What did u get out of it? Can anyone recommend an int-adv Cinematography workshop that's very hands on in or around LA? I don't often get over to the US so I'd really like to grab the opportunity. Thanks.
  25. LOS ANGELES (September 15, 2016) - The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has set February 4, 2017, as the date for their 31st Annual Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography. Daryn Okada, ASC will serve as awards chair, with Lowell Peterson, ASC, as co-chairman. The ceremony will take place at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. The ASC will honor excellence in feature film and television cinematography, along with recognizing several cinematographers and filmmakers for their contributions to the art and craft of filmmaking throughout their career. The organization has also officially opened the submission process for the television competition. The ASC is now accepting entries in three categories: (1) Episode of a Television Series - Commercial; (2) Episode of a Television Series - Non Commercial; and (3) TV Movie/Miniseries/Pilot. The deadline for submissions is November 1 by 5 p.m. (PT). To qualify for the ASC TV awards, shows must have a premiere broadcast date in the United States between November 1, 2015, and October 31, 2016. Entry forms can be downloaded at http://bit.ly/ascawardstventryform on the ASC website. The timeline for the 31st ASC Awards is as follows: September 14 - Student Award Nominees Announced October - Honorees Announcement for Lifetime Achievement Award, Career Achievement in Television Award, International Award, and Presidents Award October 15 - Student Award Winners Announced November 1, 5 p.m. PT - Deadline for Television Entries November 22 - Television Nominations Announced December - Board of Governors Award Recipient Announced December 1 - Spotlight Award submissions due December 12 (week of) - Nominations Ballots sent (Theatrical Release Only) December 31 - Awards year ends (Theatrical Release Only) January 6 - Deadline for Theatrical Nomination Ballots January 9 (week of) - Spotlight Nominations Announced January 10 - Theatrical Nominations AnnouncedJanuary 23 - Spotlight Award Final Ballots Due January 28 - ASC Open House January 30 - Final Polls Close (Theatrical Release Only) February 4 - 31st Annual ASC Awards Show Last year's ASC Awards winners included: Emmanuel Lubezki, ASC, AMC (THE REVENANT); Vanja Cernjul, ASC, HFS (CASANOVA); Pierre Gill, CSC (MARCO POLO); Adam Arkapaw, ACS (MACBETH); and Mátyás Erdély, HSC (SON OF SAUL). John Toll, ASC, Lowell Peterson, ASC, Bill Bennett, ASC and Ridley Scott were also honored at the awards gala for their body of work. Chartered in January of 1919, the ASC is defined by their reputation of excellence in advancing the art of visual storytelling. Currently, the ASC has more than 360 active members and 200-plus associate members, all from various sectors of the industry that support the skilled art and craft of filmmaking. Membership and associate membership is achieved through invitation only. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com, or join American Cinematographer on Facebook and Twitter (@AmericanCine).
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