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Found 263 results

  1. Panavision, the world-class provider of end-to-end solutions, will return to Cine Gear Expo (May 31-June 1) at The Studios at Paramount to showcase the latest innovations in the company’s ever-expanding production and post production ecosystem. Panavision, Light Iron and LEE Filters will display an array of integrated technologies and systems at booth S408 on Stage 3 – ranging from lenses, cameras and filters, to state-of-the-art production and post production workflows – that illustrate Panavision’s commitment to providing the most versatile and powerful storytelling tools. “At Panavision, our vision is to support filmmakers with solutions that expand creativity and efficiency,” says Kim Snyder, president and CEO of Panavision. “We’re always focused on adapting the tremendous power of technology to the needs of the visual artist. We’re proud and excited to demonstrate our latest advancements.” Among the breakthroughs on display are Panavision and Light Iron’s new LINK HDR system. Creatives are producing for HDR-capable distribution platforms more than ever before as consumers seek premium viewing experiences. LINK HDR was developed to address the challenge of viewing HDR (high dynamic range) images throughout the production and post production process. Offering HDR and SDR viewing options in tandem, LINK HDR provides cinematographers, directors, editors and creative talent throughout the imaging chain the ability to view their image at the same quality delivered to consumers. The LINK HDR system consists of: Panavision LINK HDR On-Set Cart – a modular cart outfitted with various monitoring configurations that offers creatives the ability to view HDR and SDR live from the camera. Light Iron LINK HDR Dailies – an NLE process that creates HDR and SDR deliverables simultaneously, which allows editors to cut, toggle between, and export in either format. Light Iron LINK HDR Finish – a combination of creative talent, technical expertise, and leading technologies that link the creative decisions made on-set to the HDR mastering process for delivery to various HDR platforms. “As adoption rates of the HDR format rapidly grow, it is more critical than ever for creatives to view a consistent image from on-set through the finishing suite,” notes Light Iron Supervising Colorist Ian Vertovec. “We want filmmakers to have all the tools they need for this new deliverable. The components of LINK HDR were designed with them in mind.” Panavision’s Millennium DXL2 and DXL-M camera systems will also be showcased at the Panavision booth, demonstrating the value of this expanding ecosystem. With new industry developments, the DXL2’s 6G 4K SDI outputs, which allow direct connection to a Teradek Bolt 4K with a single SDI cable, can now be fully utilized. The latest enhancements to the DXL2 also include: an integrated C-Motion F.I.Z. module allowing the use of Arri WCU4 wireless lens control handsets with full lens mapping support; a proxy workflow that allows easy creation of traditional dailies while archiving 8K files for DI and VFX; a wireless audio module adding expanded audio capabilities; and DXL Control for iPhone and Android. The DXL-M, which marries the modularity and connectivity of the DXL with the smaller size and weight of RED’s DSMC2 cameras, is now available to filmmakers. In addition to the Primo HDR viewfinder, DXL menu system and LiColor2, the DXL-M now offers 2x2 SDI outputs delivering two independent monitoring paths across 4x HD-SDI outputs. Along with added accessories, battery elevator and control upgrades, these advancements add to the efficiency and flexibility of the kit. The result is a fully-equipped camera that is conveniently adaptable to any shooting scenario, including drone, remote head shots and situations where space is at a premium. Panavision’s LCND, a variable liquid crystal neutral density filtration system, will be presented with expanded new features. LCND is now wirelessly controllable via the Preston handset and offers functionality that translates to creativity on the set. The ability to maintain a given stop under changing lighting conditions by riding the ND filter instead of the iris adds powerful image control options at the moment of photography. LCND also has manual controls and a 24-hour internal battery built into the single filter tray. Panavision’s longstanding emphasis on delivering superior lens quality and unmatched selection continues to be a priority as it serves the artistic needs of today’s creative community. At Cine Gear, filmmakers can examine the company’s proprietary portfolio of optics, including the Primo-X (weatherproof and compact drone and gimbal solution), Panaspeed (large format, high-speed T1.4 with the classic Primo look), H-Series (vintage portrait look for spherical large format), and UltraVista (1.65x large-format anamorphic) lines, as well as other lenses in Panavision’s large-format offerings. In addition to exhibiting, Panavision, in partnership with RED Digital Cinema, will present a panel featuring Oscar®-nominated cinematographer John Schwartzman, ASC. Panavision’s SVP of Optics Dan Sasaki will join Schwartzman as he discusses his approach to visual storytelling and explores the fusion between visual concepts and tools. Schwartzman will reveal his decision-making process from pre-production to post on such projects as The Highwaymen and the upcoming Last Christmas, on June 1 at 11:45 a.m. in the Sherry Lansing Theater. LEE Filters will highlight the LEE100, a newly updated 100mm filter mount system that boasts lighter weight and improved performance. The LEE100 Filter System incorporates a rotation lock as well as a newly designed clip-on polarizer filter for ease of use. Additionally, LEE’s full collection of lighting gels, including the expanded range of Zircon gels specifically designed for fine-tuning LED fixtures, will be touted, as well as the ProGlass CINE IRND range of neutral-density filters, precisely built to meet the exacting needs of cinematographers. “The advancements on display at Cine Gear exemplify our commitment to providing end-to-end solutions that put creative flexibility in the hands of filmmakers,” says Snyder. “Each tool is conceived as an element of a unified ecosystem designed to deliver customizable solutions to meet any need or budget. We’re looking forward to the opportunity to present the results to our friends and colleagues in the filmmaking community, and we can’t wait to see how they’re used in the visual storytelling of tomorrow.”
  2. Fellow artists, my name is Qazi, I am a professional Cinematographer, Editor, Colorist in LA. I run a studio called The Post Village. For those who are brand new to filmmaking and not sure what's next. Let's start here. I curated a list of essential PRODUCTION gear you need to get started and become the ultimate content creating machine. Watch the FULL video here: FREE LUT (Teal and Orange) included for those who are interested. Created from scratch by me. I will show you how to properly use it at the end of the video. Check the video description on YouTube. Bless up!
  3. Hey there! I just created a small piece regarding film (photography) I'm looking for critique on this piece. I realized that when I scaled my C4K from the pocket 4k to a UHD timeline, some of my clips towards the end) apparently weren't scaled correctly so a white line pops up on the right side of frame. (Lame because it doesn't show up in premiere's editing windows) Also banding is insane with YT compression so a couple of shots you notice it quite a bit. (Tried to minimize it with grain added) Anyways, thanks for stopping by and drop any tech questions you have below as well!
  4. Hello, I am looking for a used super 16 package with a PL mount. I'm interested in a SR2 or SR3 or an Aaton XTR Prod. If anyone is interested in selling please let me know! Thanks!
  5. OP is the question, although I also am wondering if these drop ceilings in the attached picture work with scissor clamps? I can't tell if the gap/space down the line is just cosmetic or functional, and these pictures are being sent to me.
  6. Im new to the forum and have a long question, but I have read a lot of posts here before so I am turning to you all for help! I bought my first super 8 camera, a Canon 310xl a couple of months ago, and in January, I bought two cartridges of Tri-X reversal to shoot with. I am a college student, so I did not have a chance to shoot until last week, so until then I kept the two carts in the fridge to keep cool. So last week, I finally opened my first box of Tri-X and loaded it into my camera. I notched hack the cart so I could control the built in filter as well! I turned the camera on and pulled the trigger, and the film ran for about 30 frames before the film transport indicator in my viewfinder stopped running, indicating that the film was not moving. So i opened my camera and pulled the cartridge out and the film had snapped! The whole cart gone. So I chalked it up to maybe a faulty cart, so I loaded my second one. And you guessed it, the exact same thing happened! Both my catridges with snapped film. So my question: Why did this happen and what can I do to fix it? I don't know enough about yet to be able to figure out whats causing the film to just break. Did the film get brittle from being in my refrigerator too long? Or is something wrong with my camera, is it too fast? Is something wrong with the takeup hooks? I just don't know. I have called Kodak about getting replacements, but scared that the same thing will happen again. If you may know anything about why my film is breaking after 30 frames I would appreciate your help. Im a college student, I can't afford just buying more film if I will never be able to shoot with it. Thanks!
  7. I'm going to shoot a short silent horror film this fall and I'd love to capture the feel of an old print that's been dragged through Hell and back. My two questions are: what would be the best frame rate to use and how can I get a blown out look like you'd see in a film from the very early 1900's? Should I overexpose the film or ask the lab to mess with the print?
  8. Leica Camera has created a fitting tribute to the world of cinema with the new release of the Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition”, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the American Society of Cinematographers. Comprised of a Leica M10-P camera and a Leica Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. lens, the memorable set offers two specially tailored Cine Look modes built into the camera’s software that make it a focused professional tool for cinematographers and filmmakers. The set also includes a Leica Visoflex electronic viewfinder and a Leica M-PL-Mount Adapter that allows the use of almost all PL mount cine lenses available on the market. In collaboration with some of the world’s most influential cinematographers and members of the ASC, Leica has developed the new Cine Look feature, which provides directors an exceptional visual experience. The “ASC Cine Classic” mode simulates a classic, analog 35mm motion-picture film look, while the “ASC Contemporary” mode delivers the current digital style of contemporary movies. Additionally, aspect ratios that are used in cinematography can also be selected from the camera’s menu. Once activated, the selected aspect ratio is displayed as a bright-line frame in Live View mode. The Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition” offers cinematographers and directors the freedom to view and assess scenes with any desired lens before filming even begins. Founded in 1919, the American Society of Cinematographers is the world’s longest-standing artistic, technical and professional organization dedicated to the advancement of cinematography. Just like Leica, this extraordinary society has influenced and shaped how people of all cultures see the world for more than 100 years. This limited-edition release is a modern take on Oskar Barnack’s original vision of the “Ur-Leica” prototype camera as an aid to cinematography, now reiterated in the unique design of the Leica M10-P ‘ASC 100 Edition’. Reduced simply to the essentials, blacked-out engravings on its black chrome surface accentuates the camera’s minimalistic feel which is further emphasized with the body leathering, similar to that of the Leica SL. The gold-colored anodized finish of the Leica Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. lens reinterprets the brass lens of the original “Ur-Leica” in a contemporary way. The unique aesthetic of the Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition” is also complemented by the ASC logo on the top plate. The combination of the included electronic viewfinder, M-PL-Mount Adapter, Cine Look pre-sets and aspect ratio options enables the use of the camera as a director’s viewfinder, making it an extraordinarily versatile and useful tool for filmmakers. And together with the Leica FOTOS App, location scouting can be made much easier, as results can be shared and discussed immediately with everyone involved in the filming project. The Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition” will be available in autumn 2019.
  9. Today, RED Digital Cinema® introduces the DSMC2® Touch 7.0” Ultra-Brite LCD Monitor to its line of innovative camera accessories. The new RED® DSMC2 Touch 7.0” Ultra-Brite LCD Monitor is a robust, optically-bonded touchscreen with Gorilla® Glass that provides the most intuitive way to navigate menus, adjust camera parameters, and review .R3D clips directly out of the camera. It offers a brighter, high-definition viewing experience for recording and viewing footage on DSMC2 camera systems, even in direct sunlight. A 1920x1200 resolution display panel provides 2,200 nits of brightness to overcome viewing difficulties in bright outdoor environments, and the high pixel density (at 323 ppi) and 1200:1 contrast ratio deliver exceptional image quality. The Ultra-Brite display mounts to RED’s DSMC2 BRAIN®, or other 1/4-20 mounting surfaces, and provides a LEMO connection to the camera, making it an ideal monitoring option for gimbals, cranes, and cabled remote viewing. Shooters can use a DSMC2 LEMO Adaptor A in conjunction with the Ultra-Brite display for convenient mounting options away from the DSMC2 camera BRAIN. A demonstration of the new monitor, priced at $3,750 (U.S.), can be seen here: https://youtu.be/sF2PmdoAZoM Link to Ultra-Brite images here.
  10. As entertainment industry luminaries prepare to swarm Park City for the Sundance Film Festival, Panavision and Light Iron (Panavision’s post production subsidiary) are proud to announce their collaborations with filmmakers on more than 25 projects screening or competing at the 2019 event (Jan. 24 – Feb. 3). The independent filmmakers behind these unique stories leveraged the innovative services of Panavision and Light Iron to provide a full range of offerings from gear to final deliverables. “We’re honored that independent artists join forces with us to achieve their vision,” says Kim Snyder, president and CEO, Panavision. “We are dedicated to delivering the tools and expertise that content creators need, wherever they are in the world, from pre-production to post.” The 2019 Sundance lineup illustrates Panavision’s enduring commitment to supporting the creative community and reinforces the importance of fostering filmmaking around the world. Across a number of titles, Panavision provided camera, lens and accessory packages, as well as dailies, offline editorial, and final color services from Light Iron. The comprehensive and single-point offerings underscore the company’s dedication to meeting the individual needs of independent filmmakers and their budget demands. Snyder adds, “Panavision’s vast portfolio of cameras and lenses coupled with our technical expertise present filmmakers with a phenomenal mix of options to creatively assemble the right equipment for any job. Additionally, the workflow savvy and creative services from Light Iron provide critical components that ensure quality imagery throughout the entire process.” Here’s a look at some of the highly anticipated productions at Sundance supported by Panavision and Light Iron: U.S. Dramatic Competition Big Time Adolescence (dir. Jason Orley, DP Andrew Huebscher) – Camera rental, Superspeed lenses, Panavision New York. Brittany Runs a Marathon (dir. Paul Downs Colaizzo, DP Seamus Tierney) – Camera rental, Primo prime lenses, Panavision New York. Color by Sean Dunckley, Light Iron New York. Hala (dir. Minhal Baig, DP Carolina Costa) – Camera and optics package, Panavision Chicago. Honey Boy (dir. Alma Har'el, DP Natasha Braier, ASC, ADF) – Camera and optics package, Panavision Hollywood. Luce (dir. Julius Onah, DP Larkin Seiple) – Panavision XL2 camera, G Series lenses, Panavision New York. To the Stars (dir. Martha Stephens, DP Andrew Reed) – Camera rental, Primo Prime lenses, Panavision Dallas. Premieres Animals (dir. Sophie Hyde, DP Bryan Mason) – Camera rental, Superspeed lenses, Panavision Ireland. Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile (dir. Joe Berlinger, DP Brandon Trost) – Camera rental, C Series anamorphic lenses, Panavision Hollywood. Late Night (dir. Nisha Ganatra, DP Matthew Clark) – Camera rental, Primo Zoom lenses, Panavision New York. Dailies by Light Iron New York. Color by Sean Dunckley, Light Iron New York. Paddleton (dir. Alex Lehmann, DP Nathan M. Miller) – Color by Corinne Bogdanowicz, Light Iron Los Angeles. Photograph (dir. Ritesh Batra, DP Ben Kutchins) – Offline editorial rentals, Light Iron New York. The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind - Opening Night Film (dir. Chiwetel Ejiofor, DP Dick Pope, BSC) – Camera rental, Primo Prime lenses, Panavision Johannesburg. The Tomorrow Man (dir. and DP Noble Jones) – Color by Corinne Bogdanowicz, Light Iron Los Angeles. Top End Wedding (dir. Wayne Blair, DP Eric Murray Lui) – Camera and optics package, Panavision Sydney. Troop Zero - Closing Night Film (dir. Bert & Bertie, DP Jim Whitaker) – Dailies by Light Iron New Orleans. Color by Corinne Bogdanowicz, Light Iron Los Angeles. Velvet Buzzsaw (dir. Dan Gilroy, Robert Elswit, ASC) – Panavision Millennium DXL2, Standard Prime lenses, Panavision Woodland Hills. NEXT Competition Selah and the Spades (dir. Tayarisha Poe, DP Jomo Fray) – Camera and optics package, Panavision New York. Color by Steven Bodner, Light Iron New York. The Wolf Hour (dir. Alistair Banks Griffin, DP Khalid Mohtaseb) – Camera rental and T-series, MAP55, and AWZ2.3 lenses, Panavision New York. WORLD Cinema Dramatic Competition Judy and Punch (dir. Mirrah Foulkes, DP Stefan Duscio) – Camera rental, C Series lenses, Panavision Sydney. Midnight Corporate Animals (dir. Patrick Brice, DP Tarin Anderson) – Color by Nick Hasson, Light Iron Los Angeles. Little Monsters (dir. Abe Forsythe, DP Lachlan Milne, ACS) – Camera rental, anamorphic lenses, Panavision Sydney. Spotlight The Nightingale (dir. Jennifer Kent, DP Radek Ladczuk) – Camera rental, PVintage lenses, Panavision Sydney. Doc Premieres Ask Dr. Ruth (dir. Ryan White, DP David Jacobson) – Color by Nick Lareau. Light Iron Los Angeles. Indie Episodic It's Not About Jimmy Keene (Dir. Caleb Jaffe, DP Noble Gray) – Color by Ian Vertovec. Light Iron Los Angeles. Special Events Lorena (dir. Joshua Rofé, DP Ronan Killeen) – Dailies by Light Iron Los Angeles. Color by Nick Lareau, Light Iron Los Angeles. Now Apocalypse (dir. Gregg Araki, DP Sandra Valde-Hansen) – Camera rental, Primo Prime lenses, Panavision Hollywood. U.S. Narrative Shorts Lockdown (dir. Celine Held and Logan George, DP Caleb Heller) – Rental package, Panavision Woodland Hills.
  11. Hi! I'm Alan Douglas, my name may not seem like it but I am from Barcelona, born and raised. I have been working on set for a while and there is quite a big industry and also lots of newcomer students or young people that just want to learn. So I'd like to start this forum for people that work and live in Spain and also for the ones that travel to come and shoot here, for any kind of questions related to cinematography or shooting needs. It would be nice also to create some kind of community for the ones from here where we can all share our ideas and help each other. Thanks!
  12. Hi everyone, I am just wondering if there are any people out there who are both directing and filming (as cinematographer) their work. And if so, what type of projects are those (short films, documentaries, etc.)? And what is your reason to do so (e.g. budget, more creative freedom, etc.)? Please note that I am not asking for a specific reason, just kind of curious. Feel free to share some examples, could be fun! Kind regards, Jaap P.s. meant to write simultaneously in the topic :P
  13. Hi All, I'm shooting a TVC on Sony Venice next week, and have been looking for Sekonic / X-Rite exposure charts for S-log3.cine, preferably in both Native ISO's so that I can load the data into my Sekonic L758-Cine light meter. Does anyone have any good sources for this? Cheers, Lewis Jelley Cinematographer T: +44 (0)2920 251 255 M: +44 (0)7929 174 457 13 Mount Stuart Square, Cardiff, CF10 5EE http://stormandshelter.com Lewis Jelley Cinematographer T: +44 (0)2920 251 255 M: +44 (0)7929 174 457 13 Mount Stuart Square, Cardiff, CF10 5EE http://stormandshelter.com
  14. What are some ways I can make the most out of my Canon C100 MKII? I've shot a few micro films on it, but I feel like I may not be using the camera to it's full potential. I watch test videos on Vimeo and they look incredible, but when I shoot I feel like I could get a way better image from my Nikon D3200.
  15. Panavision, a world-class provider of state-of-the art optics, camera systems, lighting, filters, and post production services, will showcase an array of advancements in optics at their Lens Bar at EnergaCamerimage International Film Festival of Cinematography, which runs November 10-17 in Bydgoszcz, Poland. Panavision will also host a conversation with Camerimage Lifetime Achievement recipient Witold Sobocinski, PSC, and explore the benefits of an HDR workflow. Panavision’s workshops will be held on Nov. 13, beginning with the much-anticipated conversation with Sobocinski in the MCK at 11.00. The renowned cinematographer’s credits include “Frantic,” the Oscar®-nominated “The Promised Land,” “The Wedding,” and “O-Bi, O-Ba – The End of Civilization.” He will be joined by his grandsons Piotr Sobocinski Jr. (“Bogowie”) and Michal Sobocinski (“The Art of Loving”) who carry on the family’s cinematic legacy. At 14:00, Panavision will present “Cinematic Change: HDR for Cinematographers.” With 4K HDR as the viewing standard, Panavision experts will discuss how cinematographers can remain in control of their images throughout the workflow based on knowledge of the various post-production options. In the Opera Nova, Panavision’s popular Lens Bar will include demonstrations of the latest large-format and anamorphic lenses available, as well as previews of upcoming, innovative glass options: PanaSpeed – A large-format update of the classic Primo look. At T1.4, PanaSpeed are the fastest large-format lenses available today. T Series – A set of unique anamorphic glass that includes high contrast, well-balanced aberration control, excellent glare resistance, tightly controlled anamorphic squeeze ratio, and minimal breathing. H Series – A traditionally designed spherical lens set with a glamorous, rounded, soft roll-off, giving a pleasing tonal quality to the skin. Created with true vintage glass and coating, these lenses offer slightly elevated blacks for softer contrast. High speeds separate subject and background with a smooth edge transition, allowing subject to appear naturally placed within the depth of the image. Ultra Vista – Coming in 2019, this lens is a series of large-format anamorphic optics. Using a custom 1.6x squeeze, Ultra Vista covers the full height of the 8K sensor in the DXL and presents an ultra-widescreen 2.76:1 aspect ratio along with a classic elliptical bokeh and Panavision horizontal flare. Primo X - Also available in 2019, this lens will make its mark as the first cinema lens specially designed for use on drones and gimbals. They are fully sealed, weather proof, and counterbalanced to be aerodynamic, and able to easily maintain a proper center of gravity. Primo X lenses come in two primes – 14mm (T3.1) and 24mm (T1.6) – and one 24-70mm zoom (T2.8). Additionally, Panavision’s Millennium DXL2 8K camera will be on display for hands-on demonstrations. A premier, large-format imaging ecosystem, the DXL2 offers 16 stops of dynamic range with unmatched shadow detail, a native ISO setting of 1600, and 12-bit ProRes XQ up to 120 fps. At 10 pounds (4.5 kilos), it is the lightest large-format studio camera available, offering wireless controls, a directly editable workflow option (D2E), and Light Iron Color 2 (LiColor2), among other features. The DXL2 has become a top camera of choice for cinematographers and camera crews working on features, television, commercials and music videos. Panavision will also share the newly created DXL-M accessory kit, available in Q4 2018. Designed to work with RED Digital Cinema DSMC2 cameras, it delivers the popular features of the DXL to RED MONSTRO, GEMINI, and HELIUM sensors, such as the DXL menu system (via an app for the iPhone), LiColor2, motorized lenses, wireless timecode (ACN), and the Primo HDR viewfinder. Panavision LCND will make its European debut at Camerimage. The cinema’s first dynamically adjustable liquid crystal neutral density filter instantly adjusts up to six individual stops with a single click or ramp – a significant departure from traditional approaches to front-of-lens filters, which require carrying a set and manually swapping individual NDs based on changing light. LCND starts at 0.3 and goes through 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, to 1.8. It is expected to be available in 2019. Panalux, a Panavision company, will also be set up in the Opera Nova providing demonstrations of a variety of lighting setups and formats made possible with a wide range of lighting equipment and control systems. Award-winning LEE Filters, also a Panavision company, will showcase their range of next-generation filters, including their latest products, the Zircon Filter range for LED control and the CineND, neutral density.
  16. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) named the 2018 Student Heritage Award winners during a ceremony at the organization’s clubhouse in Hollywood on October 13. Three student filmmakers were honored for demonstrating exceptional abilities in cinematography based on their submitted work. The competition is designed to showcase rising talent and inspire the next generation of filmmakers. The 2018 winners are: ASC Sol Negrin Student Heritage Award – Graduate Category: Steven Breckon for A Place to Stay, American Film Institute (AFI) ASC Gerald Hirschfield Student Heritage Award – Undergraduate Category: Matthew Hayward for The Latent Image, Columbia College Chicago ASC Haskell Wexler Student Documentary Award: Alejandro Cortes Sanchez for Adrift, School of Visual Arts NYC A panel of ASC members judged the entries, and the winners were selected from 13 nominees. “The future of cinematography promises to be exciting, especially after seeing the level of work coming from this year’s submissions,” says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. “The skill and artistry of the next generation should be an inspiration to all of us who create and capture images every day.” The ASC Student Heritage Awards are unique, as they also celebrate the memory of revered cinematographers and are re-named for esteemed ASC members each year. Negrin was nominated for five Emmy Awards — three for his work on the detective drama Kojak, one for the telefilm The Last Tenant, and one for an episode of the series Baker’s Dozen. His cinematography in television commercials also earned four Clio Awards. Negrin received the ASC Presidents Award in 2010 in recognition of not only his expertise behind the camera, but for being an ambassador of the art and craft of cinematography. Hirschfeld was honored with the ASC Presidents Award in 2007. His reputation for being a precise, exacting perfectionist led to his first major feature assignment, shooting the Cold War drama Fail-Safe for director Sidney Lumet. He would go on to shoot some 40 feature films, including The Incident, Goodbye Columbus, Cotton Comes to Harlem, Diary of a Mad Housewife, Young Frankenstein, Two Minute Warning, The World’s Greatest Lover, The Bell Jar, Neighbors, My Favorite Year and To Be or Not to Be. Wexler began his career shooting documentaries and remained a passionate documentarian throughout his career. He earned an Academy Award® in 1966 for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and a second Oscar® in 1976 for Bound for Glory. He also received nominations for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (shared with Bill Butler, ASC), Matewan and Blaze. In 1969, Wexler wrote, directed and shot Medium Cool, which is studied by film students worldwide for its cinéma vérité style. In 1992, he was honored with the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award. Many ASC Student Heritage Award winners have gone on to have successful careers in filmmaking, and several have been invited to be ASC members themselves. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com, and follow them on Instagram (@the_asc), or join American Cinematographer on Facebook, Twitter (@AmericanCine), and Instagram (@american_cinematographer). The 33rd Annual ASC Awards take place February 9, 2019. The student winners will be commemorated during the gala as well.
  17. Far From The Madding Crowd, directed by Thomas Vinterberg and photographed by Charlotte Bruus Christensen. IMDB http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2935476/?ref_=ttfc_fc_tt Trailer Synopsis In Victorian England, the independent and headstrong Bathsheba Everdene attracts three very different suitors: Gabriel Oak, a sheep farmer; Frank Troy, a reckless Sergeant; and William Boldwood, a prosperous and mature bachelor. I am going to let this post open because I need to be able to articulate a critic in a reasonable language rather than a critic full of WOWs and AMAZING. What I am going to say though is, if you like cinematography and photography, go and see it. Phil probably won't like it because of the "British hand - held indie camera work style" :P but it is very well done in this one and with a bit of analysis on the sequences. For me it has been one of those movies that open your mind and bring it to another level. More soon! Have a good day!
  18. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is now taking submissions for the television competition of its 33rd Annual ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography. The event, which will also salute the organization’s 100th anniversary, takes place February 9, 2019, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland, and winners will be announced in all categories. Three categories comprise the TV awards: • Episode of a Television Series – Commercial (half hour and one hour) • Episode of a Television Series – Non-Commercial (half hour and one hour) • Motion Picture, Miniseries, or Pilot Made for TV The deadline to enter is November 5 by 5 p.m. (PT). To qualify, shows must have a premiere broadcast date in the United States between November 1, 2017, and October 31, 2018. Entry forms can be downloaded at here on the ASC website. In addition to the TV awards, the ASC gala in February will recognize the year’s best feature film cinematography, as well as lifetime honorees. For a complete timeline of the 33rd ASC Awards, visit this link.
  19. Contenders for the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) 2018 Student Heritage Awards have been unveiled today by the organization. Designed to inspire the next generation, the awards recognize graduate, undergraduate and documentary cinematography students for their exceptional work. The 13 nominees this year hail from 10 universities nationwide, and winners will be announced October 13. The ASC Student Heritage Awards also celebrate the memory of an exceptional cinematographer and are re-named each year in honor of esteemed ASC members. This year’s Undergraduate Award is named in honor of Gerald Hirschfeld, ASC and the Graduate Award honors Sol Negrin, ASC. The Documentary category is dedicated to Haskell Wexler, ASC. Finalists for this year’s student awards are: ASC Sol Negrin, ASC Student Heritage Award – Graduate Category: • Brody Anderson for Drawn Curtains, Chapman University – Dodge College • Steven Breckon for A Place to Stay, American Film Institute (AFI) • Andres Gallegos for Shoe Shiner, San Francisco State University • Yair Halper for Sauna, American Film Institute (AFI) • Heyjin Jun for Difficult People, University of Southern California (USC) School of Cinematic Arts ASC Gerald Hirschfield, ASC Student Heritage Award – Undergraduate Category: • Jack Craymer for Sonora, Chapman University – Dodge College • Matthew Hayward for The Latent Image, Columbia College Chicago • Grace Marrero for The Girl and the Bird, Florida State University (FSU) College of Motion Picture Arts • Simms Wright for Sodium Vapor Nights, University of North Carolina (UNC) School of the Arts ASC Haskell Wexler Student Documentary Award: • Alejandro Cortes Sanchez for Adrift, School of Visual Arts NYC • Rachel Lattin for Monumental, Chapman University – Dodge College • Minagi Tanaka for She Comes at Night, State University of New York at New Paltz • Xinzhong Zhao for Francis Ford Coppola’s Live Cinema, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Negrin was nominated for five Emmy Awards — three for his work on the detective drama Kojak, one for the telefilm The Last Tenant, and one for an episode of the series Baker’s Dozen. His cinematography in television commercials also earned four Clio Awards. Negrin received the ASC Presidents Award in 2010 in recognition of not only his expertise behind the camera, but for being an ambassador of the art and craft of cinematography. In 2007, Hirschfeld was honored with the ASC Presidents Award. His reputation for being a precise, exacting perfectionist led to his first major feature assignment, shooting the Cold War drama Fail-Safe for director Sidney Lumet. He would go on to shoot some 40 feature films, including The Incident, Goodbye Columbus, Cotton Comes to Harlem, Diary of a Mad Housewife, Young Frankenstein, Two Minute Warning, The World’s Greatest Lover, The Bell Jar, Neighbors, My Favorite Year and To Be or Not to Be. Wexler began his career shooting documentaries and remained a passionate documentarian throughout his career. He earned an Academy Award® in 1966 for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and a second Oscar® in 1976 for Bound for Glory. He also received nominations for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (shared with Bill Butler, ASC), Matewan and Blaze. In 1969, Wexler wrote, directed and shot Medium Cool, which is studied by film students worldwide for its cinéma vérité style. In 1992, he was honored with the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award. Many ASC Student Heritage Award winners have gone on to have successful careers in filmmaking, and several have been invited to be ASC members themselves. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com, and follow them on Instagram (@the_asc), or join American Cinematographer on Facebook, Twitter (@AmericanCine), and Instagram (@american_cineamtographer).
  20. Hello All! New to this forum so I'm not sure if this is the right section to post this. We will be doing a documentary for a philanthropic women's group. This documentary will be highlighting women who have overcome obstacles and have risen to the top. We are wanting to do a POV scene where someone is looking up at a glass roof from the lobby of an office building and they rise straight up and crash through the glass ceiling. We are thinking a scale model might work as we are not set up to do CGI in the detail they will want. Not sure if this is the right approach. Any ideas how to pull off this shot would be appreciated.
  21. RED Digital Cinema will showcase its DSMC2™ camera line-up at IBC in Amsterdam from September 14 - 17. Located in Hall 13, Elicium Tower, 4th Floor, RED will feature its DSMC2 camera brain with three sensor options – MONSTRO 8K VV, HELIUM 8K S35 and GEMINI 5K S35. Additionally, RED will demonstrate an 8K workflow, covering 8K REDCODE RAW, HDR, and its enhanced image processing pipeline (IPP2). RED experts will be available to answer questions and offer insight into the possibilities for efficiently producing 8K projects. The DSMC2 camera BRAIN includes high-end frame rates and data rates regardless of the sensor chosen. RED’s modular camera system allows a shooter to configure a fully operational camera setup to meet their individual needs. RED offers a range of accessories including display and control functionality, input/output modules, mounting equipment, and methods of powering the camera. The DSMC2 camera is capable of up to 60 frames per second at 8K, offers 300 MB/s data transfer speeds, and simultaneous recording of REDCODE® RAW and Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD/HR. The flexibility of RED’s modular camera designs with accompanying accessories and integration solutions can also be seen on the show floor through a variety of manufacturers, including Sigma, Cooke, Zeiss, Angenieux, Schneider Optics, Teradek, CoreSWX, Fujifilm and Motion Impossible. Projects shot on RED include the upcoming Voyage of Dr. Doolittle (Guillermo Navarro, ASC), A Million Little Pieces (Jeff Cronenweth, ASC), Maleficent 2 (Henry Braham, BSC), and King of Thieves (Danny Cohen, BSC), among many other productions, including Eighth Grade (Andrew Wehde), Mindhunter (Erik Messerschmidt), Stranger Things (Tim Ives), Godless (Steven Meizler), GLOW (Christian Sprenger), and House of Cards (David M. Dunlap), to name a few.
  22. Hi! I wanted to start a series of posts where I could keep track of what is going to University to study film studies or cinematography. Not so many years ago when I was struggling to understand the little words I knew in English I found this forums and I started reading (with a dictionary) every single thing I could. Thanks to the knowledge of a lot of people who were and are on this website I got better as a camera intern and then as a second assistant camera so I hope this post and consecutive posts that I am thinking about writing will help people in the future when they think about: "Should I go to a film school or not?" because they will see all the process that took me from being a non - student to a full time student. So, a little bit about me! As of today, October 6th, 2014, I'm a 33 years old Spanish second camera assistant who left Spain in 2010 after spending a lot of years working on American commercials, American movies, English movies and second units of different things. At that time I was starting to shoot short - films as a cinematographer and probably, hadn't I left Spain, I would be shooting commercials now as a cinematographer.. with very bad quality. The reason why I left Spain is because I wanted to improve my English (which in a 0 to 10 scale was 1) in order to go to study a Cinematography masters in AFI in L.A.. and I almost got there! I applied to AFI for the 2012 / 2013 cinematography course and as they were asking for a minimum of 100 in the TOEFL exam I couldn't get in because my score was 99, yeah! 1 point, but their rules are their rules :) and although I had the recommendations, the support of the Fulbright Scholarship and some other things, they said no. And I'm super happy I didn't get there because I started working for Apple in Cork (Ireland) and I discovered that "the office environment" was kind of interesting (and Apple was paying really really really well for the job I was doing). Also I started to focus a bit more on still photography, which is something I adore and love, and I found out that the more I was shooting, the more I was going towards darkness and colours. But I was missing something while working at Apple and it was the set life :) so I decided to start shooting short - films in Ireland.. and by doing that, I knew that I couldn't work in Apple anymore because I needed to follow my passion, cinematography. While trying to decide what to do I came across the National Film School in Ireland, home to cinematographers like Robbie Ryan, James Maher (member of the forum if I don't remember badly), Piers Mc Grail and so many other interesting ones. I went to the open day and what I saw was a place where I could spend time to create and learn things that I wanted, something that you miss when you are working full time, either in movies or Amazon or Apple.. sure you see loads of lighting setups while working on sets but if you are a 2nd AC, you better be focused on your job unless you don't want to work anymore. So, this National Film School was offering a 4 years Bachelors Degree (Honours) in Film & Production, being the 4th year the one where people choose a specialization. Probably the same kind of course as it is offered in America, Europe and etc so nothing fancy! And I said: Ok! If I can get in 4th year that would be awesome! I will spend 1 year doing what I love, learning things that I don't know, polishing my skills and they will give me a Bachelors Degree even! Plus they got two Alexas and a super new big studio! The decision wasn't that easy, although I had no commitments in life at the moment (no mortgage, no children, nothing at all) the money that I was getting from Apple was a very serious thing and you all know how the world spins! However, after a lot of months of thinking about it I decided to quit my job at Apple and become a student of the university (which accepted me with no problems) because I knew that I needed to pursue my dream. My reasons to go to uni were the following ones: - In University you have all the equipment you need to learn the craft. - You learn! I can't write it any bigger but it is an important point, you learn! - You also make friends and get to shoot a lot so you can try things that you couldn't try in a working environment when money is involved. - You also experiment with film / video if you want to. - You will be focused on YOU and that's THE POINT because nobody else is going to teach you what you don't know that you don't know! - They will teach you how to find your voice and apply it in different projects. - My uni is absolutely empty in the evening (something that I don't understand tho) and our classes have 2K projectors, dolby sound system and a big screen so from 6 to 8.30 I watch and analyze movies when I'm not shooting. - I have access to lecturers to talk about things that I can't talk about with anybody else (like the cinematography of Dersu Uzala for example!) and their point of views are always interesting even if they are not the same as mine. - I have to write a thesis!!!! something that I haven't done ever (it's my very first time in Uni). I find the process absolutely beautiful because I'm learning a lot about things that I didn't know. - In some unis or schools you have super top lecturers and that is fantastic! you can learn from them a lot! Some other unis don't have those lecturers but still they have very good teachers and they can address things that you hadn't thought about on your own. - If you go to AFI or NFTS you probably will end up as a top cinematographer / director / scriptwriter shooting commercials, features and such. While other unis won't give you that visibility you choose what you want to get out of uni and if you are passionate, driven about what you do, you should get the most out of your school! - Usually, Film schools have a sort of grading suite that you can use, so learn how to grade and use it! - You will have a library with a lot of books and you can wander around the shelves looking for Film Lighting by Malkiewicz and end up with a book with photos of the architecture of Tadao Ando! You won't have that at home because we search for what we know that we need and Google won't give you results on other things if you are looking for Film Lighting. - You will get a degree at the end of it and then you can choose to go for a Masters on any other thing vaguely related if you want to. - I really know that I won't become a cinematographer ever, and it doesn't bother me at all at all, I'm doing it because I needed to do it. My goal is to become a cinematographer, a good one with something interesting and different to say, but if I don't get there, I won't regret it because I will have done the trip :) I can only say: Go to film school!!! even if it is not one of the top ones, because it will give you a lot of knowledge (cinema wise) and you will find there if cinema is what you want to do for the rest of your life or you better get something else. And probably, if you are reading this and still are in your early 20s.. go go go! finish it and then try getting a degree in something else that you might like or is related (communications, marketing, advertisement..) because that will give you a backup plan in case your filmmaking career doesn't go as planned. Or you can go to the backup plan course first and then going to film school :) it doesn't matter! Learning is always great great fun and playing and toying around with cameras is even better. I will be posting how uni goes on here and what I learn as the weeks fade. Last week we had the first cinematography class, in a black studio with nothing else, just a monitor and the black curtains). Everybody was not very interested in the lecture and the testings we were running and were out of the class smoking or chatting, so I asked for a couple of 1K and asked for permission to play with them during the lunch break... and the image below is what I got. What I really miss is a light in the background to create colour contrast and if I could ask for something else.. what about a window to create a sense of darkness outside with a cyanish night or a green steelish night or even orange!? :D I will be shooting the image above with the Alexa very soon and we will see what I get!!! :) If you have gotten here, congratulations! :D I hope it solved some of your questions! :) and if you want to post some of your thoughts, you're more than welcome! :) Best!
  23. Hello Cinematography lovers! I hope you're all well! I recently shot a music promo using all natural and golden hour light! Filmed on location in the UK, where normally it's not like this! Hope you enjoy & thanks for watching!
  24. I wanted to add my new book as an option alongside the classics from Blain Brown, Harry Box, and John Jackman. Shaping Light for Video in the Age of LEDs; a practical guide to art, craft, and business of lighting. By Alan Steinheimer. 2018. Available now at Amazon and B&N websites. Shaping Light ... is a practical, hands-on guide to lighting for video. Using a Dummies-style approach, the book explains lighting techniques through real-world examples, including recent updates on the groundbreaking use of LED lighting and wireless control options. This book focuses on firsthand application of technical knowledge, to appeal to cinematography students and video freelancers. Beginning with simple lighting setups and progressing to more complicated scenarios, the book holds the reader’s attention with illustrative anecdotes, and links theory to real-world applications. There is a 30 page glossary/set vocabulary at the end that would be useful to most newbies. The e-book is coming as well as peering into the first 16 pages at Amazon.
  25. Panavision, the entertainment industry’s leading designer, manufacturer and rental provider of high-precision optics and camera systems, has named Zoe Iltsopoulos Borys to lead the company’s Atlanta office as vice president and general manager. Borys will oversee day-to-day operations in the region, and ensure Panavision’s customers continue to receive the highest level of service to support their production needs. “Zoe is a respected partner to the cinematic community and we are pleased to have her on the team at Panavision,” said Michael George, Panavision’s chief operating officer. “Her understanding and familiarity with the needs of our customers will be an invaluable addition to our presence in the region. Filmmakers can be confident that they will continue to receive our superior service, along with our innovative Panavised camera systems and premier lenses.” Borys’ 25 years of experience in the motion picture industry includes business development for Production Resources Group (PRG), and general manager for Fletcher Camera and Lenses (now VER). This is her second turn at Panavision, having served in a marketing role at the company from 1998-2006. Throughout her career, she has been responsible for bringing innovative technology to the creative community, empowering them to bring their vision to the screen. She is also an associate member of the American Society of Cinematographers. Panavision’s Atlanta facilities, located in West Midtown and at Pinewood Studios, are the largest suppliers of camera rental equipment in the southern U.S., with a full staff of prep technicians and camera service experts. The Atlanta team has provided equipment and services to productions such as Avengers: Infinity War, Black Panther, Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Baby Driver, and Pitch Perfect 3, among others.
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