Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'day'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Cinematography Forums
    • General Discussion
    • News & Press Releases
    • Lighting
    • Camera Operating
    • AC's & DIT's
    • Grip & Rigging
    • Visual Effects Cinematography
    • Grading, DI and Telecine
    • Students and New Filmmakers
    • Cameras Systems and Formats
    • Lenses & Lens Accessories
    • Camera Accessories & Tools
    • Film Stocks & Processing
    • Books for the Cinematographer
    • Cinematographers
    • In Production / Behind the Scenes
    • On Screen / Reviews & Observations
    • Cine Marketplace
    • Business Practices
    • Jobs, Resumes, and Reels
    • Please Critique My Work
    • Regional Cinematography Groups
  • Not Cinematography
    • Producing
    • Directing
    • Sound
    • Editing
    • Off-Topic
    • Forum Support

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Skype


Location


My Gear


Specialties

Found 11 results

  1. Hello everyone, I have a TVC coming up and could use some lighting tips regarding a day interior (living room and kitchen) (pics attached). My question is how (or if) to utilize the natural light from the windows. More specifically how should I decide between the amount of natural light to use vs. using artificial lights. Or whether to even use natural light and just go artificial keep everything controllable. I have a sizable budget so have the freedom to bring in any lights I'd need and to pre-rig. It's an open white walled space so light will spill anywhere and while it needs
  2. Good evening from Spain! I have a shooting in two weeks where they want a rear projection, it's an exterior day and we have a 6500 lumens projector and a 300x225 cm retroprojectable screen. Will I need more lumen output in the projector in order to have my image sharp? I've done this before but not in shootings, just in live events, where the projection quality is not mandatory to be clean and sharp. I will pack some additional large black cloth to try blocking sun going through the screen, but I'd appreciate some more tricks! Thanks a lot and happy new year!
  3. Hi everyone, thanks for looking through and the advice ahead of time. I have a shoot fast approaching and I'm debating the best way to light my exterior scene for an upcoming commercial. We will begin shooting early morning and we will see a family enter an amusement park from one angle where the sun is backlighting them - and then we will need to reverse the camera to see their POV. It will be a very sunny day I'm sure with no clouds so we should get some nice backlight. I'm debating however whether to front lit with a large ultra bounce (20x20 or 12x12) using the sun to light the family
  4. Hello Everyone, My name is Vicken Joulfayan, and I am a new member here! I am a graduate student at the New York Film Academy in the Masters in Filmmaking program but my focus is primarily on cinematography. I am the DP for seven master thesis film projects, two of which are scheduled to be shot in the next several weeks, and am in need of advice for lighting. Although I have researched a lot and have a general idea of how to light each project, I need your advice in deciding which exact equipment to rent. The projects have budgets but they are minimal. I've embedded links to the first tw
  5. Hello, I'm working as a gaffer for a student film this January. The story is a drama/thriller that follows a man who dies and becomes trapped in a sort of limbo state of being. It's dark. It's fantasy. Our budget is very modest, but I'm very interested in using half hampshire on the windows for all day interior scenes - I love the blur it gives. However, those scenes make up only 30% of the film and the rest is night interiors. I'm wondering, can hampshire be used on windows at night to any great effect? I've looked into using dirty water and a spray bottle, but I imagine it will lack
  6. Good day, For a low budget short I will have many day exterior scenes (in moving and parked car and on the street) where I initially thought using only scrims, reflectors and negative fill, because I was afraid adding light would slow us down too much. But we are in winter and being in the mountains the weather (and light) can change very dramaticaly in very little time so I thought that if I took only one single but very powerful artificial source it could not slow us down so much and would up the results noteably. I figure a 6 or 8K would fit every shot (as I can always bring
  7. Hi Guys. I'm new here and relatively new to lighting for film. I'm hoping this forum will guide me and help me improve my lighting techniques. I'm shooting a small corporate on Saturday and there is one shot on which I would appreciate your suggestions. I have not had a chance to recce the location but have been sent this photo from the client. The scene must look like daytime, but unfortunately due to a tight schedule it is likely to be shot at dusk (best case) or in total darkness (worst case, hopefully not as I will then be battling exterior sodium street lighting too).
  8. Starting a feature this week and the director wants a very "yellow springtime" look to our lighting. Mostly the highlights. Attached is a photo and isn't the best because the female is blonde as is probably natural backlight but this is the the rough tone. So my question is: to get that warm almost sunset color without getting too red/orange, has anybody played with more yellow color correction on daylight lit scenes? So on our HMI's instead of adding CTS or CTO for a little end of day glow playing more with yellows. I've but aside (from LEE) 100 Spring Yellow 767 Oklahoma Yellow
  9. Hey Everybody, I'm new to the forum, but I was hoping to get some advice from you guys here. I was asked to light a night for day scene for the web series that I have been gaffing on. This isn't the biggest of problems since it is an interior scene. I've lit this place before, and I've only had to deal with making small windows appear to have sunlight coming in. But in this shoot the main character has a conversation in front of 2 glass doors. It is in a garden level business with the glass doors opening onto a patio area in the front. To top it off, the scene is supposed to take place at d
  10. Hello all, I have a bit of a dilemma with a scene I am shooting where the director would like the lighting to change from night to day in one shot. The shot is in a (small) kitchen on a mid of a man sleeping at a table. We have a 400w HMI, 2k blonde as well as an 800w fresnel and 2 650's. We don't see the window in this frame which does help out a little. I was thinking of simply blacking out the window and then slowly letting the light come through starting at the top and moving down so the daylight hits the top of the ceiling first and then spills down to fill the room, then re creat
  11. Hi everyone, Very soon I'll be shooting a western short in the desert, mostly with HMI's, ultra bounce, and unbleached mus. My question to everyone is, will the warm color of the sand lower the overall color temperature of my daylight. I know we conventionally rate "daylight" between 5200k & 5600k. Right now I'm a thinking that the HMI's will appear too cool for day exteriors. Maybe the smartest thing to do is work with 4x4 mirrors and simplify things? Also, I'm contemplating using kerosene lamps and small tungsten units on flicker boxes for interiors. If anyone has experience shooting i
×
×
  • Create New...