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Found 39 results

  1. As camera's keep coming out with higher and higher resolution models (far beyond what our eye can resolve) and with company/studios like Netflix trying to force content creators to film their content in 4k (claiming to want to "future-proof" their investment).... Do any of you have any strong opinions on this and/or have you heard of anyone or you yourself not been able to sell your film BECASE it wasn't UHD or 4k (obviously SD has some hurdles)... I am considering filming some doc stuff while abroad for a year in Sri Lanka (a feature included) using a Super-16 lens (Canon 8-64) in a windowed 2.5k cropped sensor (from a 4k BMP4k) as I think the focal range, the character, sharpness and speed will be the "perfect" lens while abroad... However I am nervous about the workflow (that is unless BMD decides to offer a S16 Windowed mode which they really should) and or having a hard time selling it once it is completed realistically 3+ years down the road. Any thoughts?
  2. https://vimeo.com/327032597 We are documenting events here in Japan prior to the 2020 games for practice. Thank you for all your input. We filmed Tokyo Marathon, I love Ireland Parade, Holi 2019, and most recent a Go Ruck event. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, LODI Team Japan
  3. Hello to everyone, This summer I will go in East Asia to shoot a small documentary, and I will be for one week in the middle of the jungle, my concern is how to charge the camera batteries and how to run the laptop for bump the cards. There is something different to carry an heavy small generator? Thank you in advance. Eloy
  4. I came across this teaser for a documentary by Alexandre Favre called Bolex: The Last Employee and thought the readers of this forum might appreciate it. https://vimeo.com/150185992 The contemporary footage was shot using a Bolex modified for super 16, and the audio was recorded on a Nagra. The historical footage and commentary is interesting. Particularly the bit about small camera assembly lines being staffed by women, who were presumed to be more agile than men. The level of precision and craftsmanship that went into these machines is pretty inspiring. I'm looking forward to seeing the full length documentary when it's released.
  5. Hello everyone, I've got some questions about materials and push-processing in the 30s. I'm working on a the British documentary "Coal Face" (1935) by GPO film unit. There is quite a bit of information on GPO in general but almost nothing on that particular film. I studied photography, so I could tell just looking at the film that some parts of it were heavily pushed. Since it's a scientific paper I can't just "know" it's the case, I have to bring arguments in favour of it. And while I know that the extreme graininess and high contrast are good indicators for push-processing, it would be even better if I could find further proof, and that's where my questions start. I'll include two screenshots from the film, that demonstrate the huge difference in quality. The first screenshot is from a scene above ground inside a building whereas the second was made in a coal mine. According to one of my sources [Enticknap, Leo. "Technology and the GPO Film Unit" The Projection of Britain: A History of the GPO Film Unit. Eds. Scott Anthony and James G. Mansell. London: Palgrave Macmillan on behalf of British Film Institute, 2011. 188-198.], the camera used by GPO was a Autokine with a 50mm/2in lens with a minimum aperture of f1.9, most likely one of these: https://www.scienceandsociety.co.uk/results.asp?image=10405810 Does anyone know where I could find out which stock they used? At the time most likely panchromatic, but that's about as far as I got. The other thing is, I found lots of information for photography and push-processing but next to nothing on film and push-processing, though I'm assuming it must have been quite common, especially in the documentary movement. If anyone knows of any (quotable) source for this kind of information, it would be a great help. I found some websites but a published book or an article in a journal is always preferable. Thanks a lot!
  6. Hello All! New to this forum so I'm not sure if this is the right section to post this. We will be doing a documentary for a philanthropic women's group. This documentary will be highlighting women who have overcome obstacles and have risen to the top. We are wanting to do a POV scene where someone is looking up at a glass roof from the lobby of an office building and they rise straight up and crash through the glass ceiling. We are thinking a scale model might work as we are not set up to do CGI in the detail they will want. Not sure if this is the right approach. Any ideas how to pull off this shot would be appreciated.
  7. Hi everyone! My name is Michael Lau, and I work for Sepia Films, an independent film production company based in Vancouver and LA. As big fans of this community, we are so excited to tell you about our documentary KEEPERS OF THE MAGIC, which spotlights cinematographers such as Roger Deakins, John Seale, Gordon Willis, Vittorio Storaro, Bruno Delbonnel, and Philippe Rousselot. It is being released across the US on August 7th through VOD (US Satellite/Cable), IVoD (iTunes, Google Play, etc.) and Home Video (Amazon). KoTM is both an homage to the great films of our time and a personal exploration of the artists that created them. It features candid interviews and intimate insights into the work of these legendary cinematographers amongst others (including Directors George Miller and Sam Mendes) as they discuss their careers and most memorable movie moments. The film is the passion project of Vic Sarin, an eminent DP/Director in his own right, who wanted to celebrate the masters of this largely unsung art form. You can find more information here: https://www.imdb.com...2/?ref_=nv_sr_1 And a link to the trailer here: . Our goal is to give cinematographers the recognition that they seldom receive; but to do so, we need to reach as many people as possible. Please don't hesitate to ask any questions! Michael
  8. Hi everyone! My name is Michael Lau, and I work for Sepia Films, an independent film production company based in Vancouver and LA. As big fans of this community, we are so excited to tell you about our documentary KEEPERS OF THE MAGIC, which spotlights cinematographers such as Roger Deakins, John Seale, Gordon Willis, Vittorio Storaro, Bruno Delbonnel, and Philippe Rousselot. It is being released across the US on August 7th through VOD (US Satellite/Cable), IVoD (iTunes, Google Play, etc.) and Home Video (Amazon). KoTM is both an homage to the great films of our time and a personal exploration of the artists that created them. It features candid interviews and intimate insights into the work of these legendary cinematographers amongst others (including Directors George Miller and Sam Mendes) as they discuss their careers and most memorable movie moments. The film is the passion project of Vic Sarin, an eminent DP/Director in his own right, who wanted to celebrate the masters of this largely unsung art form. You can find more information here: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2828532/?ref_=nv_sr_1 And a link to the trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Whe6WjofzQ4. Our goal is to give cinematographers the recognition that they seldom receive; but to do so, we need to reach as many people as possible. Please don't hesitate to ask any questions! Michael
  9. Hi everyone, Upon reading my question most of you will probably be like: "...why?", but hear me out. I'm looking for options to mount a recorder/shotgun-mic combo on a Krasnogorsk 3 camera. For my own experimental documentary work I want to use my K3. I've used it a few times now. Hand-processed the film and am mostly satisfied with the results. I'm interested in using non-sync sound with the images. (Playing a lot with the sounddesign in the edit). For this purpose, the images are digitized. I finish most of my projects in digital. I like the K3 for its simplicity and small size. In terms of sound, I'm interested in the things that occur around the image, where the frame ends so to speak. Also - the things heard right before and after a scene. I'll be recording on my own and that's why I need a quick and easy to use setup. Having to put the camera down to handle a recorder-mic combo like a Zoom H6 would be to slow and I think I'd quickly run into situations where I would have no place to put the camera for the time being. Right now, I'm thinking of creating some sort of cage to mount a small recorder-mic unit like the Zoom F1 on top of the camera. Ideally, I'd be able to mount a rosette grip somewhere as well. The K3's is not making it easy on me though. I need to be able to access both sides in order to wind the camera and change the film, and I need to be able to access the back for the viewfinder. So, there it is! If any of you can think of some DIY solutions to this problem please do share! Or if you know of some very modular cages that might be suited, that would be great as well! Thanks!
  10. ARRI AMIRA CAMERA PACKAGE INCLUDES: AMIRA CAMERA BODY WITH PREMIUM LICENSE - 980 HOURS MVF-1 ELECTRONIC VIEWFINDER GOLD MOUNT BATTERY PLATE PL LDS LENS MOUNT BPA-3 AMIRA BRIDGEPLATE VIEWFINDER EXTENSION BRACKET VEB-3 MHB-2 MIC ADAPTER BRACKET KC-50 AMIRA POWER CABLE SHORT AMIRA VIEWFINDER CABLE LONG AMIRA VIEWFINDER CABLE CFAST2 MEDIA CFAST2 CARD READER USB 3.0 AMIRA USB STICK ENTIRE PACKAGE COMES IN PELICAN CASE WITH CUSTOM AMIRA CUTOUT asking $35K US or best offer. see a website with pictures here: jonstaav.com/amira camera based in TORONTO but i brought it with me to LA until FEB11 for a show and have the camera with me if anyone wants to see it. contact me at [hello@jonstaav.com] -jonathan staav DP/TORONTO
  11. Does the DJI Ronin supports a Sony F55 camera, with a Compact Prime lense and a ffocus wireless? Which recommendation can you give me?
  12. Hey guys, I'm a 24 year old Cinematographer living in Seven Sisters, London. I recently shot a film called The Mechanic. Its a 60 second doc about Bo Hare, a mechanic and engineer working in rural England, who finds pleasure in the restoration of classic cars. Shot on a Blackmagic Ursa 4K with mixed tungsten and practical fluro lights, i'm a cinematographer, but I directed this as well as shot it. Drone shots on a DJI Inspire 3 Adv. Used vintage nikon AI-S primes to shoot everything, very much recommended if you are on a budget, tons of character, they flare beautifully. There is going to be a longer version forthcoming, but this cut dives straight in to the character and is hopefully an intriguing minute! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6oVWtugUyo Its for a competition running by Sony Europe where I could win a camera, so if you enjoyed it please like it on youtube..! :) Feel free to shoot with any questions or thoughts! Orlando
  13. Hello everyone! This is the trailer. Will be glad any reviews. https://vimeo.com/193785050
  14. American Society of Cinematographers Announces Finalists for 2016 Student Heritage Awards LOS ANGELES (September 14, 2016) - Continuing their mission to advance the art of cinematography by inspiring and educating the next generation of filmmakers, the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has announced the nominees for the 2016 ASC Haskell Wexler Student Documentary Award and the Vilmos Zsigmond Student Heritage Award for Undergraduates and Graduates. A panel of prestigious ASC members judged the entries, and selected 18 students from a talented pool of filmmakers with exceptional abilities in cinematography. The students represent 12 different U.S. film schools; winners will be revealed on October 15. The finalists are: Documentary category: Rachel Bardin of the University of Texas at Austin, RTF for Nocturne Mina Fitzpatrick of Northwestern University for Run of Press Colin F. Shepherd of Rochester Institute of Technology for Into the Microscope In the Undergraduate category: Logan Fulton of Loyola Marymount University for Clementine Tyler Harmon-Townsend of UNCSA School of Filmmaking for The Roma Project Marz Miller of Art Center College of Design for Opaque Ian Quill of Chapman University for The Witching Hour Isaiah Rendon of University of Texas at Austin, RTF for Barrow Emmett Sutherland of Art Center College of Design for Closer Derek Tonks of University of Southern California for Simon Parker In the Graduate category: Jeremy Donaldson of Florida State University for Isa and the Frog Prince Simu Feng of American Film Institute Conservatory for Breathe Wesley Hunt of American University School of Communication/Film for Moonshot Andrew Jeric of USC School of Cinematic Arts for Prisoner Kai Krause of American Film Institute Conservatory for Unremarkable Matthew J. Petrunak of Kent State University for Paper Harvest Nicholas Ramsey of Chapman University for Angeltown Jessica Ynez Simmons of Northwestern University for Emerald Ice The ASC Student Heritage Awards are renamed annually in memory of an extraordinary ASC member. This year, the awards are dedicated to Wexler and Zsigmond--both cinematic legends and beloved ASC members. Wexler, who began his career shooting documentaries and remained a passionate documentarian, earned an Academy Award® in 1966 for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and a second Oscar® in 1976 for Bound for Glory. He also received nominations for One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (shared with Bill Butler, ASC), Matewan and Blaze. In 1969, Wexler wrote, directed and shot Medium Cool, which is studied by film students worldwide for its cinéma vérité style. In 1992, he was honored with the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award. "Haskell was a revered, successful commercial moviemaker whose passion for nonfiction storytelling never wavered," shared ASC President Kees van Oostrum. "It is fitting that this award be given in honor of Haskell who always effused enthusiasm for the documentary community, and was a mentor to many." Zsigmond was one of the Society's most distinguished members. In 1978, he earned an Academy Award® for Close Encounters of the Third Kind. He received additional nominations for The Deer Hunter (1979), The River (1985) and The Black Dahlia (2007). He won an Emmy® in 1993 for shooting the HBO movie Stalin. Zsigmond served on the ASC Board of Governors for many years. In 1999, he was honored with the organization's Lifetime Achievement Award. "Film students have been studying Vilmos' brilliant images for years, and will continue to do so long into the future," said van Oostrum. "He was always so generous with his time, consistently sharing his experiences with emerging filmmakers and students from around the world. He made a great impact on the art form, both through his own work and the work of those he nurtured." For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com, or join American Cinematographer on Facebook.
  15. Hello guys ! I'm going to shoot a short documentary about skaters in the street , so most of shots will be with available light and I will use slr camera . so I need some advice for shooting like camera motion , tips for using available light also rigs also if there is any reference it will be great . Thanks in advance
  16. I've recently had a bit of an epiphany and realized that I want to be shooting nature documentaries, more so than narrative fiction. Enter the issue: All my camera and lens research thus far in my career has been focused on cinema, and my understanding of the necessities for doc work is lacking. What kind of camera systems are you guys using for documentary field work? I've got my eye on a Sony F5 for its compact, lightweight body and (in my opinion) beautiful images. Suggestions?
  17. Looking for some critique on a short film I made! Thanks! (Don't bother telling me about the quick change of dialouge in the ending, I already know haha) https://vimeo.com/143703968
  18. Hi everyone. I'm shooting a short character doc in Greenland in two weeks. I'll be on a ship/boat most of the time. My camera is C100 with atomos ninja star. Lenses are: Sigma 18-35 1.8 / Canon 24-70 F4 / Canon 70-200 2.8 and I have an old school Olympus 50mm 1.8. Do I need any special filters? And if so, which and what brand. Otherwise any suggestions are very much appreciated. Thank you :)
  19. The first of its kind, this workshop on wildlife cinematography is taught by EMMY award winner Robin Cox and Keshav Sishta in conjunction with Field Projects International and Primates Peru in the Amazonian rainforests of Peru. Be one of the first eight applicants to register to receive the early-bird rate ($2400 per person). Enrollment opens: June 8, 2015 at 8 am (Central Standard Time) Unlike any other workshop out there, students will gain exclusive access to expert cinematographers and field biologists at the same time! At the completion of the course, students will enhance their portfolios, gain a blue print for producing nature and research documentaries, technical know-how under challenging field conditions, and a network of colleagues that will help you further your career. Previous film making experience is a bonus but is not a prerequisite for this course. Participants must have a working knowledge of photography, and familiarity with a DSLR camera - no other prior experience is necessary. Details on the course can be found here, and the registration form can be found here. Contact us at admin@primates-peru.org for further questions.
  20. Another great article by Phil Rhodes in the June issue of American Cinematographer. This one is for all us film lovers. It discusses the making of a short documentary, the subject of which is a man who owns one of the last film shops in the world, devoted solely to Super 8 and 16mm. He hits all the salient points we talk about here. You can view the film here: http://www.liamsaintpierre.com/the-way-of-the-dodo/ Thanks, Phil!
  21. Hi! We are looking for a Camblock operator who loves adventure and cinematography for a documentary we will be shooting in Baja (California) in a few weeks. We will be down there for a couple of weeks and its a paid gig. We're based in LA. Please contact georgina@usc.edu if interested. Best, Georgina
  22. Hi guys, I want to share with you my last documentary short, shot on tri-x super 8. MINUTERA Minutera is a reflection about photography, about what we lost. vimeo.com/k3films/minutera Enjoy!
  23. A short documentary I shot exploring a little bit of the world through the eyes of the homeless. Please I'd like your thoughts on it. It's super short and I'd love to make it longer. Sadly It was a one man crew and I tried my best! I wish so much I could have had someone dedicated to the audio on set but it was just me and it was in a real world environment so I either get the interview or I don't... I feel that my audio is the weakest part of this mini doc and ironically the most important. Maybe it can be better adjusted in post but I'm not too good in that department of audio. http://youtu.be/7526GdVQgMM https://vimeo.com/113297473 Thank you
  24. Hi everybody. Urgent question. I'm in the process to get Sponsorship for our documentary, we'll shoot with a BlackMagic Pocket Cam. We have 2 options for the Zoom Lenses we'll going to use: 1. Arri-Zeiss Zoom 11-110 S16mm PL Mount 2. Zeiss Compact Zoom CZ.2 28-80 T2.9 We're aware that both are great lenses. The S35 Compact Zoom would demand a Metabones Adapter, but that's no problem at all. I wonder which would you guys pick and WHY? Of course the S35 one is new, and that might be a benefit. Thoughts? Thanks, F
  25. Hello everyone, sorry to bother! This would be my first post in this forum, I hope I won't disturb anyone with anything. In 2012, I spent a couple of weeks on the ancestral continent. From my raw footage, I managed to assemble a kind of a documentary, as you can see following the URL: The comments are welcome. Thank you in advance! Best regards, Eddie D
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