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Found 16 results

  1. Screening the best in International contemporary short film & programming for other festivals across the UK & Internationally, the ESFF is now open for submission for short film-makers! We're offering cash prizes for Best Film, Best Animation and Best Scottish Film But that's not all! This year, we're also excited to be curating film programmes from submissions for our 2018 partners: DC Shorts - The US East Coast's largest short film event, Mecal - the Barcelona International Short Film Festival Sardinia Film Festival Fastnet Film Festival Firenze FilmCorti Hidden Door and many others! Max Length 25 minutes, international films welcomed, all genres eligible. Open for entries online and via Film Freeway & Withoutabox. Please note, deadline for submissions ends on Monday June 25th 2018 Enter Your Film Here http://www.edinburghshortfilmfestival.com/call-for-entries/
  2. With new awards and global tours, the Edinburgh Short Film Festival is a highly pro-active festival with over 20 screenings across the world AND Also offering cash prizes and industry mentoring to the film-maker who wins the Best Film AND the best Animation at this year's ESFF! We're also curating for film festivals across the world including Barcelona, DC Shorts in Washington, Fastnet Film Festival in Ireland and the Sardinia Film Festival and the winning films would be included in the programme for our international events and screenings. But the Deadline is fast approaching for entries: Monday June 26th 2017: http://www.edinburghshortfilmfestival.com/call-for-entries/
  3. Edinburgh Short Film Festival Submissions Now Open for 2017 Screening the best in International contemporary short cinema in Edinburgh each Autumn and curating programmes for other festivals across the UK & Internationally. This year, we're excited to be programming films for our 2017 partners: Asia's largest short film event, Short Shorts Film Festival & Asia based in Tokyo, as well as the Sardinia Film Festival, Australia's Scots Day Out and Hidden Door in Edinburgh and we can also announce that we will be partnering the Barcelona International Short Film Festival for 2017 We're also planning to expand our awards structure with prizes for Best Director & Best Animation! http://www.edinburghshortfilmfestival.com/call-for-entries/
  4. Screening the best in International contemporary short cinema at venues across the Scottish capital in Autumn. The best films will be included in our programmes for other festivals across the UK & Internationally. This year, we're excited to be programming films for our 2017 partners: Asia's largest short film event, Short Shorts Film Festival & Asia as well as the Sardinia Film Festival, Australia's Scots Day Out, Hidden Door in Edinburgh and some other partnerships we'll announce shortly We're also planning to expand our awards structure more details about that soon, In the meantime, we're open for entries online: http://www.edinburghshortfilmfestival.com/call-for-entries/ Or via one of our partners - Film Freeway,Withoutabox, etc. watch this space for more details soon!
  5. Screening of Semi-Finalists at Slamdance Showcases Glorious Array of Super 8 Films Kodak announced the Grand Prize winners of the KODAK Super 8 Filmmaking Challenge, following a screening of remarkable works from the 15 semi-finalists’ films at the Slamdance Film Festival last night. Kodak launched the Super 8 Filmmaking Challenge in November 2015 as part of the company’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of Super 8, a beloved format that inspires content creators far and wide. The Challenge immediately struck a creative chord, and over 530 films from around the world – narrative, music videos, experimental, classic surf and skate, documentaries, archival, fashion, and home movies – were submitted. The films showcase the robust depth of talent among filmmakers, both professionals and amateurs alike, as well as the diverse range of the capabilities of Super 8 as a unique storytelling tool. Filmmakers entered both vintage and new work in one of three categories: POV, Action and Flashback. From the original entries, 15 semi-finalists were chosen through online audience voting and juried selection. Those 15 semi-finalists, who earned a hosted screening at the esteemed Slamdance fest, competed again in a global online audience vote, which determined the final first, second and third place audience winners. Boasting prizes valued at $12,500, the Grand Prize Audience winners of Kodak’s inaugural online contest are: 1. Pablo Madrid Lopez from Spain for THE NOVEL, receiving a prize package that consists of a KODAK PixPro SP360 Action Camera, a Rhonda CAM Super 8 Camera from Pro8mm, 10 Pro8mm Super 8 film kits, approximately $2,000 retail value of KODAK motion picture film of the winner’s choosing, and a KODAK t-shirt. 2. Haven Nutt from the United States for the MR. MAN trailer won a KODAK PixPro SP360 Action Camera, six Super 8 film kits, and a KODAK t-shirt. 3. Dianne Ouellette from Canada for RED IS DEAD takes home a KODAK PixPro SP360 Action Camera, three Pro8mm Super 8 film kits, and a KODAK t-shirt. Renato Coelho from Brazil, who directed TRAIN, won the Grand Jury Award, which was chosen by a panel of respected industry professionals. Judges included cinematographer Rachel Morrison; photographer Elliott Landy; writer-producer Josh Friedman; Glenn Gainor, head of physical production at Sony Screen Gems; Leslie Raymond, executive director of the Ann Arbor Film Festival; and Pro8mm founders Phil and Rhonda Vigeant. Coelho earns an identical prize package as the first place Grand Prize Audience winner. “Jurying the Super 8 Challenge allowed me to reconnect with the medium and see the variety of creative exploration,” said Raymond, who led the jury. “I am excited to see it persisting as a member of the film family.” At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas earlier this month, Kodak announced an initiative to support Super 8 film into the future. The company introduced a prototype of a new Super 8 camera, and revealed plans for creating an ecosystem that includes a range of cameras, film development services, post production tools and more. “Kodak is resolute in our efforts to ensure film continues to be an option for filmmakers passionate about using it for all levels of content creation,” said Sascha Rice, Global Marketing Director for Kodak’s Entertainment Imaging Division. “The response to this contest and to the new Super 8 camera has been overwhelmingly positive, and the momentum to shoot on film is palpable. Kodak is honored to be here to support and advance these artists’ creativity.” To discover recent movies, television, and music videos shot on 8mm, 16mm, 35mm, and 65mm film, go to: www.kodak.com/go/shotonfilm.
  6. Short Films Wanted! The Edinburgh Short Film Festival has opened it's call for entries for the 2016 edition. The best submissions for 2016 will be included in our short film programming for other festivals across the UK and Internationally during 2016 as well as being screened at the Edinburgh Short Film Festival in October-November 2016. We will also be working closely with our partner festivals and are planning on programming some of our best films from 2015 for the Trinidad & Tobago Film Festival in September 2016 and the Sardinia Film Festival in June 2016. We're also programming short film for Edinburgh's remarkable arts festival Hidden Door in May. In addition, we can confirm we'll be curating for Japan's biggest short film festival,Short Shorts in Tokyo and we are delighted to play host to a hand-picked selection of Japanese short film for our 2016 edition later this year. We're also now offering the Rising Star Award for the most promising film-maker with a cash prize, tickets to film festivals, offers of work and the Rising Star Trophy sponsored by the Matthew Martino Benevolent Fund. And if that's not enough, we're also planning lively networking events, Q & A sessions, meet the film-makers, panel discussions and even some live music! Submissions are now open for films under 20 mins (any genre) so get your skates on! EDINBURGH SHORT FILM FESTIVAL
  7. The Deadline for submissions to the 2015 Edinburgh Short Film Festival is fast approaching! Last call for entries will be on June 29th 2015! The ESFF will be programming short films for festivals and arts events across the world from Tobermory to the Trinidad & Tobago Film Festival and from the Sardinia Film Festival to Stornoway in the Scottish Western Isles! And of course, we’ll be screening the best films submitted at venues across Scotland's beautiful capital city during the Edinburgh Short Film Festival in November! As well as taking short film on tour across the world, we’re also delighted to announce that we have teamed up with International Charity Organisation Matthew Martino Benevolent Fund to award the Rising Star Award for the best film made by a Director aged 16-25 or a first-time director! With a cash prize as well as on set work experience and tickets to film festivals! Deadline for submissions is Monday June 29th, Time is running out so don’t delay…submit today!! Edinburgh Short Film Festival Submissions
  8. The Chicago International Film Festival’s 11th annual CineYouth Festival is now accepting short films (10 minutes or less) from filmmakers 21 years old and younger from around the world. Held in Chicago May 7-9, 2015, CineYouth strives to encourage the talent of young artists and to provide them with opportunities to tell their stories, network with their peers and be recognized for their creativity. Entries must be postmarked by March 23, 2015 to be considered. Award winning films are shown at the Chicago International Film Festival and winning filmmakers are awarded cash prizes! For details and guidelines, visit: http://www.chicagofilmfestival.com/year-round/cineyouth/entries/ Submit! We look forward to viewing your films!
  9. Kodak Panel to Focus on the Modern Film Workflow BYDGOSZCZ, Poland - Kodak will host an in-depth conversation with Lol Crawley, BSC and colorist Greg Fisher on November 20 during Camerimage, the international film festival of cinematography. The discussion will focus on the process of choosing an origination format and how that translates to post, as well as address ways to control the look from camera to screen in today's multi-format landscape. Clips from Crawley's award-winning films will be shown, including Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom and Ballast, along with a sneak-peek at his upcoming project. Paul Collard, VP of Film & Digital Services at Deluxe in London, will moderate the session, which takes place at the Opera Nova. A UK native, Crawley's extensive credits include Hyde Park on the Hudson, Four Lions and On the Ice. He won the Cinematography Award at Sundance in 2008 for his work on Ballast. Fisher is based at CO3 London. He has worked on such features as Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2, Hugo, Gravity, and World War Z. Prior to joining CO3, he honed his craft on regional features and commercials at Digital Film Lab, Denmark and Digital Film Finland. "Film remains a strong preference for many filmmakers, and we're excited to hear what these talented artists have to say about creating powerful visual stories," says Kodak's Sam Clark. "We have received tremendous support from the industry this year, making it possible for us to extend the life of film. Through this session, the audience at the festival will take away several compelling reasons that continue to make film a viable choice for creative, technical and economic reasons." For more information about Camerimage, visit www.camerimage.pl, and for more on Kodak motion picture films, go to www.kodak.com/go/motion.
  10. Last night I attended my first ever 3D screening in "RealD 3D" I had no idea that the screening was going to be in 3D as there was no indication of this in the description on the website: https://whatson.bfi.org.uk/lff/Online/default.asp?BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::permalink=whitehairedwitchoflunarkingdom When I arrived they handed me the glasses and I was like "Oh I must be at the wrong screening and I showed them my ticket (which also said nothing about 3D on it) but it turned out that it was indeed the right screening. Having got inside I sat down and suddenly realised that not only was it in 3D but of course it was a subtitled film. Normally I have no problem with subtitles but this film featured tiny little subtitles that floated in front of the movie. It took me about 15 minutes to get the hang of reading the subtitles in 3D although it was still hard to see the movie and the subtitles at the same time as it required more concentration on the floating text. By this point I had kind of missed a lot of the dialogue which was annoying because it was quite a convoluted movie anyway. Having got the hang of it I was very unimpressed with the images which just looked like viewmaster stuff in motion and seemed pointless and annoying. It just seemed like a silly effect like when people get too carried away with photoshop or something. It was at it's best when the effect was very mild. Oddly I found that sometimes the movie looked better with the glasses off obviously for a lot of scenes it was blurred in a nasty way and you couldn't read the subtitles without the glassed. About half way into the movie there was some strange fight scene that was very fast and it had a very strange effect because I felt instantly nauseous and had to claw the glasses off my face as fast as I could. It was very odd as the effect was almost instant and very sudden unlike "The Blair Witch Project" thing where you slowly get sick from the shaking camera work. I'd not experienced anything like it. Once that scene was over I was able to wear the glasses again without problems beyond the more general pain of doing the 3D thing. It was beyond unpleasant for the few seconds it lasted. Oddly once it was all over and I got up to leave I felt really, really dizzy and once I stepped outside it was a very strange experience because everything seemed suddenly hyper real and magical. The only thing I can compare it to was a very mild version of when you have been through some kind of traumatic event and you are out the other end and you have that feeling for a while like you are going to make an effort to enjoy your life and make the most of your future. It was kind of like that on a small scale. The movie wasn't great but the whole 3D thing was a really unpleasant experience. Thankfully it was my first 3D movie so at least I feel like I know what everyone is talking about with it all now, so I got something out of it for my pain. I can't believe that 3D tickets attract a premium. It was quite horrible and I will be sure to try and avoid the experience again. Freya
  11. BURBANK, CA (October 10, 2014) - FotoKem, a returning sponsor of the New Orleans Film Festival, will present a panel discussion with the production team behind the making of Black and White, starring Academy Award® winners Kevin Costner and Octavia Spencer. The film, making its U.S. premiere, opens the festival on October 16. The conversation, "A Case Study: Black and White," will take place October 18, at 4:45 p.m., in the Rehearsal Hall at the Contemporary Arts Center (2nd Floor). Panelists are expected to include Producer Todd Lewis, Co-producers Jasa McCall and Gbenga Idowu, Production Supervisor Will Greenfield, Location Manager Elston Howard, and Project Manager David Hall, who oversees operations at FotoKem New Orleans. Carroll Morton, manager of entertainment industry development for the City of New Orleans, will moderate. "Working with the Black and White team on this meaningful and timely project was a distinct honor," says Peter Santoro, Vice President of Sales at FotoKem. "We look forward to sharing that experience with the audience at the festival as well. Our team here in New Orleans works closely with filmmakers to provide the most advanced services possible to support their creative vision. We're delighted to be part of the community and to support the New Orleans Film Festival's 25th anniversary." Produced entirely in New Orleans, Black and White tells the moving story of the custody battle for a young girl. Costner plays a grieving widower who has helped raise his bi-racial, parentless, granddaughter (Jillian Estell) since the death of his daughter in childbirth. When he assumes legal guardianship, the child's paternal grandmother (Spencer) wants the child returned to her son, who may be an improbable choice. The emotional drama that ensues raises thought-provoking and difficult questions about life, death and race. Black and White was directed by Mike Binder and shot by Russ Alsobrook, ASC. The New Orleans Film Festival-now in its 25th year-has firmly established itself as one of the most recognized regional film festivals in the country. Over 22,000 filmmakers and fans attend the screenings and sessions that celebrate the city now known as "Hollywood South." FotoKem, headquartered in Burbank, opened a satellite office in New Orleans in 2011. Bringing the expertise of FotoKem staff and advanced technology to the region, the office supports the burgeoning local production environment by offering a range of post production services, including their award-winning nextLAB system with an infrastructure for file-based dailies, file delivery services and offline editorial systems. To ensure rapid content delivery from one location to another, the NOLA office is fully integrated with FotoKem's globalDATA platform, which facilitates delivery of content via a secure internet connection anywhere in the world. In addition to Black and White, several films that recently screened at Toronto and Telluride relied on FotoKem's global services and expertise for their post production needs. They include Wild, 99 Homes, Maggie, Welcome to Me and Songs She Wrote About People She Knows, among others. For more information on FotoKem, visit www.FotoKem.com. For more about the New Orleans Film Festival, go to http://neworleansfilmsociety.org.
  12. This year's Edinburgh Short Film Festival is once again open for Scottish, UK and International short films: http://www.edinburghshortfilmfestival.com/#!form/c7d5 The Edinburgh International Film Festival are kindly offering an award for the Most Creative Short Film at this year's Edinburgh Short Film Festival. The prize for the winner - to be chosen by a joint judging panel and announced at our closing night party - will be 1 delegate pass to all industry events at this year's EIFF. The ESFF 2014 trailer can be seen here: In addition we can also offer 2 tickets to the EIFF Gala Opening Night & Party as the prize in a draw to the winning subscriber to our new quarterly newsletter! To enter just email our mailbox: edinburghshorts@gmail.com Winners will be announced at our closing night party on Sunday June 15th at Summerhall.
  13. The 4th annual Seattle Shorts Film Festival is now accepting submissions of 30 minutes or less in the following categories Narrative, Documentary, Animation and "College Student Shorts" featuring a rolling fee of just $10.00 including photocopy of college ID. Don't miss the chance to screen your film in front of an international audience November 8th, 2014 at the SIFF Cinema. This year the Seattle Shorts Film Festival, is also featuring all-star jury including actress Venus DeMilo Thomas who's credits include the 90's Nickelodeon series, "Salute Your Shorts", the sitcoms, "Family Matters" and "Sister, Sister". Earlybird deadline March 15, 2014 Late deadline May 30, 2014 Please visit our website at www.seattleshort.org for more information including a complete list of rules, and deadlines.
  14. Hello everyone! This is my first time posting to the forum. I use the site for reference all of the time, but never became a member until now. I'm hoping to gain insight as to the best way to execute the music licensing process as a 26 year old independent filmmaker. The project is funded entirely out of pocket, so as terrifying as it seems, I plan to try and tackle the endeavor on my own. I know that a copyright attorney or clearance company could greatly expedite this, but again I'm trying to keep my costs as low as possible, because I know licensing the music itself won't be cheap. Here is some background information: The song I intend to use is a cover of a popular song from the 1960s. The band that covered the song was a group no one has ever heard of. It was recorded by a company that no longer exists (A1 records [a division of Trans Canada]). The company was sold, sold again, renamed several times and I guess now is a relic of the past somewhere in a basement filing cabinet. I traced the company from the 60s to a large Canadian conglomerate (Quebecor Media) whose subsidiaries control a good portion of the media and entertainment industry in Canada. The company I believe who owns the rights is called Distribution Select. Even if they don't own the rights, hopefully they will be able to point me in the direction of the person who does. I digress. From what I have learned from reading about the subject I have gathered the following: - I need both synchronization rights and master use rights >synchronization to use said music in tandem with my visual imagery >master use to be able to use the specific recording of the song in general - I need to obtain rights for the physical recording of the song, as well as the intellectual property rights. These are usually separate from each other. >contact person who owns the recording (artist or label) >contact intellectual property owners (publisher/songwriter/entity/entities) All of this is still a tad confusing to me, so if I am wrong on any of this, please correct me. Because my song is a cover, which by the way is recorded in a foreign language (French), what rights do I need and from whom? I assume it would be something along these lines… I would need to get both the synchronization rights and the master use rights. Synchronization, I would get from the Canadian company that I hope still has records that they in fact own the song. For the sync rights I would also need to contact the publisher/representative to the party that owns the intellectual property rights to the original song that is being covered. So contact the owner of the recording of the cover, then the covered song's original composer? Who then would I contact for the Master Use rights? Would I need to contact multiple sources, as I did to acquire the sync rights? Sorry, I know this is getting lengthy, but I'm almost done. Lastly, which party do I contact in order to obtain a film festival license, which if I remember correctly has a two year cap? Also I would be interested in looking into some kind of limited use license (for internet and possible small scale future distribution)? Are these licenses' processes ones which involve obtaining rights from multiple parties as well? I know the basic formula is the more exposure the film gets, the more royalties you have to pay out. I also read it is pretty imperative to negotiate all prices for all licenses needed upfront if possible. This is why I am asking so many questions. I'm merely trying to cover my bases and proceed in a correct and educated manner. I apologize if reading all of this made your brain hurt. Thank you (:
  15. Hello there, I launched a new short film over the web a few days ago. We have been chosen as official selections at a few festivals and have won Best Cinematography at the Fantasia Film Festival in Montreal, as part of the Quebec short films. I'd love to get some feedback from anyone watching the film. Any comments, suggestions, thoughts, etc. Whatever anyone wants to share, I'd be delighted to hear it. Thanks and hope you enjoy :) Here it is. KIN.
  16. BYDGOSZCZ, Poland (November 19, 2012) – Kodak is hosting a discussion with cinematographer Mihai Malaimare Jr. at Plus Camerimage, the international film festival of the art of cinematography, on November 28 at 15:30 (3:30pm) at the Opera Nova, first floor seminar room. Festival attendees will hear first-hand why Malaimare and director Paul Thomas Anderson chose to shoot 85% of the critically-acclaimed movie on the 65mm film format and project it on 70mm in select theaters. Immediately following the conversation, Kodak will showcase their new Asset Protection Film portfolio, which includes two color and one black-and-white separation film optimized for recording images from the digital workflow back to film. As the only proven archival medium, Kodak has responded to customers’ needs by developing innovative options for independent filmmakers, broadcasters, documentarians, as well as studios, to preserve their assets for decades. KODAK Color Asset Protection Film 2332 is optimized for content owners who originate or finish their productions on digital formats and want to protect their valuable media for the future. The brand-new KODAK VISION3 Digital Separation Film 2237 is an archival stock for preserving images from color digital masters and is optimized for laser, CRT and LED light sources utilized by digital recorders in the marketplace. Paul Collard from London-based Deluxe 142 will also join Kodak to share his thoughts on the importance of archiving on film, based his experience with many restoration projects over the years. “Kodak has participated and supported the Plus Camerimage festival since its inception in 1993 because of the unique global forum it provides filmmakers to discuss issues and share ideas,” says Kodak’s Kai Langner, Regional Sales Director and Vice President for the Entertainment Imaging division in Europe, Africa and the Middle East. “The festival draws a large number of cinematographers and students from all over the world, which gives us a great opportunity to show them how committed we are to innovating motion picture technology. We are proud to be part of the 20 year history of the festival, and look forward to many more.” For updates on what is happening at the festival, follow Kodak on Facebook and Twitter. For more information about the festival, visit http://www.pluscamerimage.pl, and for more information about Kodak visit www.kodak.com/go/motion.
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