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Found 10 results

  1. Hey everyone, I'm wondering if I were to use a 1.2k HMI with a magnetic ballast in the UK on wall power (50hz) - if keeping my shutter angle at 180, will I get flicker at 50fps or 100fps or is it only likely to happen when I move off these frame rates? I know magnetic ballasts can be a little more finicky for flicker.
  2. Hi, looking for help on how the slower dream like look is achieved. I saw in Park Walbeck's video, , that he recorded the video at 30fps and then converted the clips to 24fps. Does anyone know if there is a way to do this in iMovie or perhaps in Final Cut Express? Would it look the same if I was to shoot at 30fps and then slow the clip down in iMovie? I just mostly take videos of our family vacations or birthday parties. If you use this technique for your videos, how have achieved it/what editing software was used? Thanks so much!!!
  3. I'm looking for a power source for my Eclair NPR 16mm camera and I think I'm starting to get a rough idea of what to look for (still open to suggestions tho) but one key question: does a higher frame rate require more volts? The manuals I've seen online suggest a 12 volt, 3-5 Amh battery to power the Perfectone motor but I've seen discussions about the motor stopping as soon as the FPS rate goes up. Someone who appeared more knowledgeable than myself said the higher frame rate would require higher voltage. Possibly up to 15 volts. However I've also read discussions where people warn against using a battery or power source that is rated higher than the suggested voltage for the motor. Any thoughts or experiences with this subject? Thanks
  4. I was reading the Oscillating the ISO on Alexa thread yesterday and in it David says so I was wondering is there an easy way do to a calculation of this sort on the spot without any aid from a gadget or an exposure calculator: What is the difference in exposure between ƒ/4.5, 24 fps, ISO 640 and ƒ/2.8, 60 fps, ISO 800?
  5. Eon S Mora

    23.98 vs 24

    My question is partly technical, and partly just a curiosity: When shooting digitally, has anyone noticed a difference between shooting 23.976, and straight 24.00 FPS. I know this is the nearly negligible difference, but these are two different rates of capture. is there any perceptive change in how it feels or the way movement is perceived? Just some context: shooting a film with some folks that are used to shooting film. The project in mind will end up with some sort of theatrical release however it'll obviously be shot, finished and watched all digitally. If this isn't being printed to film, does NOT shooting 23.98 create an enormous post headache? Final question, is any of this worth exploring?
  6. Hi everyone, Lately, I came across this video on youtube about Gilles Deleuze's Film Theory. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaXQdjMxG6E As the intellectual content of the video interested me a lot, it was the footage that hypnotised me with it's study of pure, simple, monumental movements, as found in the very first film experiments. (can someone confirm the date and origin of these images by the way?) Now, what I would really like to know is what it is that makes these movements so beautiful? In my view, it has something to do with the materiality of the filmprocess itself, that comes to the surface by using low frame rates and thus making the process of multiple still images turning in one moving image very touchable and visible. Now, there has to be more. I did some experiments but did not come to a feeling of movement as in these little shots. Can someone, besides a general discussion about this, tell me some technical stuff about these images? Thanks! Sander
  7. Topic: Smoother HFR / frame interpolation / soap opera look. I just came back form watching Dracula Untold in a spanish cinema (specifically the Yelmo Cineplex Icaria movie theatre in Barcelona). The movie has pretty great visuals, but something felt wrong. It didn't have the cinematic feel I'm used to and love. After a few seconds I was sure the movie was played in 30fps or more. But after checking out imdb to find out that the film was shot on Kodak I am not so sure any more. The first time I came across this in cinema (other than of course The Hobbit) was watching A Million Ways to Die in the West (shot on Sony F55) in a Danish Cinema (Cinemaxx Copenhagen). The way this movie was projected definitely looked like 30fps or more, and felt cheap -- 20 minutes after A Million Ways to Die in the West had ended, we watched 22 Jump Street (shot on Alexa XT) -- and this movie had none of the high frame rate / frame interpolation feel. Same cinema. 22 Jump Street felt like a real movie. I can't seem to find out at what frame rate either Dracula Untold or A Million Ways to Die in the West was shot nor at which it was intended to be projected in Cinema -- But my real worry is this, Are some digital cinemas beginning to use frame interpolation to smooth out motion jitter etc. like popular consumer TVs? Note: The DVD version of A Million Ways to Die in the West feels right. I'm pretty sure there is some frame rate related gimmick going on. Any ideas or thoughts?
  8. Hey, So I am a fairly new cinematographer and as a school project am DOP on a PSA. The director wants to shoot at 240fps which is cool to look at in a dolly out at 35mm lens traveling about 25 feet starting 10 feet away from the subject to (you guessed it) 35 ft away. In 10 seconds. I know the epic can do the frame rate smoothly and all but my real concern is the pockets of light in the background coming from various trees and bushes. I want to use HDRx but have never used it before in a dolly shot. Are the frames in HDRx take at the same time? Will it look more jerky and "flickerish" in post? The ambient level is around f16 the hot spots are f64, shooting at f2.8 with ND 6&9 and HDRx at 4 stops I am hoping to maintain the lighting to be consistan and normal, without hotspots. Is there something I am missing or overlooking
  9. Hello I've been making Super-8 and 16mm and 35mm short films most of my life as a filmmaker and DP, and for the past few years I've started moving towards digital filmmaking. At first I was using MiniDV but the quality was very cheap, so my equipment now is a Canon EOS Rebel T1i that I equip with old 1.4 lenses, and a Sony NEX 3 that I also equip with a bunch of old lenses some of which are handmade/modified lenses. My question is this : Which one is the camera that I should use the most for my films? The EOS has a 20 fps frame rate but a very large image (1920x1080) so maybe that's bad? I only have like three lenses that can go on it and the lenses I design cannot go on a camera with a mirror. Is it that bad to shoot 20 fps? I used to shoot 18 fps with super-8mm. Handheld, the images are too shaky. The NEX has a better frame rate of 30 fps but the image is 1280 x 720, although I have way more lenses for it and most of the homemade lenses I build can go on it because it is mirror less. I've had issues with the compression, though, that make it annoying to use this camera. When handheld, the images aren't too shaky though. I think maybe I should get a NEX-VG10? At the end of the day, I'd love to have a camera that's not too bulky and can shoot very good images, not too compressed, with an e-mount. Getting good sound isn't a priority. I also think it might be possible to get an external SSD recorder to plug in the HDMI of the Sony NEX, thus I would have an uncompressed image from the NEX? At the end of the day, I've used more than 80 different cameras to make my films, and I feel like the search can be endless, although I know the content is what matters more than the tool. But please let me know what you think.
  10. Hello I've been making Super-8 and 16mm and 35mm short films most of my life as a filmmaker and DP, and for the past few years I've started moving towards digital filmmaking. At first I was using MiniDV but the quality was very cheap, so my equipment now is a Canon EOS Rebel T1i that I equip with old 1.4 lenses, and a Sony NEX 3 that I also equip with a bunch of old lenses some of which are handmade/modified lenses. My question is this : Which one is the camera that I should use the most for my films? The EOS has a 20 fps frame rate but a very large image (1920x1080) so maybe that's bad? I only have like three lenses that can go on it and the lenses I design cannot go on a camera with a mirror. Is it that bad to shoot 20 fps? I used to shoot 18 fps with super-8mm. Handheld, the images are too shaky. The NEX has a better frame rate of 30 fps but the image is 1280 x 720, although I have way more lenses for it and most of the homemade lenses I build can go on it because it is mirror less. I've had issues with the compression, though, that make it annoying to use this camera. When handheld, the images aren't too shaky though. I think maybe I should get a NEX-VG10? At the end of the day, I'd love to have a camera that's not too bulky and can shoot very good images, not too compressed, with an e-mount. Getting good sound isn't a priority. I also think it might be possible to get an external SSD recorder to plug in the HDMI of the Sony NEX, thus I would have an uncompressed image from the NEX? At the end of the day, I've used more than 80 different cameras to make my films, and I feel like the search can be endless, although I know the content is what matters more than the tool. But please let me know what you think.
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