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Found 3 results

  1. Hi guys, Just had this clip pop up in my feed, and I was struck by the key lights in the first section around the card table: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oz8TYyn-k40 Straight-up hard keys. And they look great, almost seamless. I had to actually pause the clip at first to confirm that it was actually hard lighting. I feel like you could use this lighting in any contemporary film and "get away with it" without spoiling the look or feeling incongruous with the soft-lit keys that (these days) shape the vast majority of shots. Indeed, most of Goldeneye is very much soft-lit. Now I know this is Phil "F**king" Méheux's work, and I'm not worthy to smell the ground he cinematographically walks on. But I'd love to hear how people would approach a situation like this. I feel like it's reasonably obvious that the hard lights were simply the only practical way to pick out Bond and Onatopp from the crowd is such a large, and crowded environment (they look about a stop hotter than everyone else, which serves that purpose really nicely. Also, with such a large table, and a lot of top-light providing the general ambience, booming in softer keys for the close-ups would have been obviously time-consuming and a bit problematic. But why do these keys look so smooth and seamless (when others so rarely do)? Is it just a really precise key-to-fill ratio? I'd love to hear people's thoughts. I feel like mastering this kind of hard-lighting would make a lot of nightmare lighting situations (like this one) a great deal easier. Trying to wrangle big soft sources all the time can be a real pain.
  2. I will be doing a shoot in jungle. I want to know how can I control the day outdoor light. The weather condition around here is sometimes rainy and hard sunlight. I want to do various scene in different lighting, so please help on how I can create the different lighting scene 1. diffused lighting on character and the surrounding trees. 2. hard side light to fall in character face. 3. using top sun light for a day murder scene. ( i want to use a lot of highlight in the scene, how it would be as using top sun light? and what precaution are required ) Kindly help me with what hmi, or solars i can use and how to use it I want to have a bit of contrast between the character and background ( i want the character to be 1 stop up and the surrounding to be 1 stop down )
  3. Hey everyone! Long time reader, first-time poster. Recently, in a number of films I've been watching, I've seen a vast amount of ways to light through windows. I brought this subject up to a lighting professor of mine and we've been having discussions on it since. I know that to create realistic and natural window lighting, you need to use a mixture of hard and soft light to represent the sunlight and the soft skylight. Of course, the mixture and positioning of these depend on the time of day you're going for. I haven't had the time to do any tests of my own, but I will attempt some soon. I have a few questions when it comes to this topic: 1. Have any of you done this in the past and how have you accomplished it? 2. What type of fixtures and diffusion have you used? 3. Do any of you have any experience using tracing paper on the window itself? And if so, is there a fixture that would still be able to push hard enough light through it to represent the sunlight? I'm completely okay with windows blowing out, especially when working on low-budget projects where you don't have the resources to light whats outside the window. Thanks!
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