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Found 10 results

  1. According to the article "The Steadicam and "The Shining" (American Cinematographer - August 1980) Garett Brows says : "To annoy him we would indicate the forest of TV antennas aimed at the studio from suburban Borehamwood and imply that the TV signal was escaping the sound stage and being watched by a gaggle of “Monty Python” women every morning: “Ooooh, poor Mr Brown!… That take seemed perfectly good to me!” Somewhat later, our imitation ladies got even more sophisticated: “Ooh, must be the 24mm Distagon!, see how it’s vignetting in the viewfinder!” I was thinkking if that "24mm Distagon" is a Zeiss Standard Speed 2.1 (in The Shining kubrick used Super Speeds 1.4) OR the Canon 24mm ASPHERICAL 1.4 he used in Barry Lyndon ... As i know .. 24mm Zeiss distagon doesn't vignetting !!! but a Still converted to Cine lens ??? -Probably Brows called "distagon" the canon not becouse it's is "official" name but becouse of his curvness -Also the 1.4 speed of Canon would be a great advance in this low ASA 80's What do you think ?? Thanks
  2. According to Larry Smith's interview on American Cinematographer : Kubrick framed Eyes Wide Shut in the standard 1.85:1 format, primarily using a set of Zeiss Superspeed T1.3 spherical prime lenses, but occasionally opting to employ Arri’s T2.1 variable prime lenses or a zoom. (...) The results of the two-stop force-development are clearly evident in the film’s FIRST major setpiece (...) The scene was lit almost entirely with a huge wall of ordinary Christmas lights (...) " They were very low-wattage (...) The effect is obviously enhanced by the force-developing, which made the lights appear to be much brighter than they were(...) "We decided to shoot nearly all of the picture at a stop of T1.3, and since we were pushing everything, we were able to create a wonderful warm glow. We also used a Tiffen LC-1 [low-contrast] filter for our night interior scenes, and the effect it produced is especially evident in the party sequence—it made the lights glow and gave everything a slightly surreal edge." Although the filmmakers used no additional lighting in wider shots of the party, Smith did modify his approach for close-ups of the actors, utilizing a China ball containing a dimmer-controlled 200-watt bulb. "The China balls were very useful if there was any movement in the scene, because they’re very light; we could just walk around with them and do anything we wanted. Normally, I only used a small amount of fill light when things began to get a bit murky, because I knew that the force-developing would give us the exposure level we needed For the scene in which the Hungarian FIRST approaches Alice, I created some fill with a smaller curtain of the Christmas lights." -So Larry Smiths says that they shoot nearly all of the picture at a stop of T1.3 ... And as we know the ballroom was low lighted so they should use the zeiss super speed T1.3 WIDE OPEN (f1.2) .. RIGHT?? -We also know that the Nicole Kidman's dance was shot with the Cooke Varotal 20-100 f2.8 T3.1 Note the word "FIRST" on Larry Smith phrase : "For the scene in which the Hungarian FIRST approaches Alice, I created some fill with a smaller curtain of the Christmas lights." The "first approache" is that shot which include a ZOOM IN around in the half of it's length : Then it cuts to a static shot with much more sharpness and longest Depth of Field And then, starts the dancing, which as i can figure out, it's a 360o rotation round the camera's tripod 1. So for the dancing they had the china ball ABOVE the CAMERA'S POSITION ?? 2. The need of the "small curtain" ONLY in the the "approache moment" ,was it beacouse of the "wide" open shot of the ZOOM LENS in the beggining ??? And china balls wasn't enough to "cover" the f2.8 of the Cooke zoom lens ??
  3. Hello .. Can anyone identify what zoom lenses are ?? I'm pretty sure the one from 'The Shining' it's Cooke Varotal 20-100mm T3 But what about the other's ?? Thanks again !!
  4. Kaspar Kamu

    The Shining

    Dear Forum, Stanley Kubrick is a director whom I have admired for as long as I can recall. His innovations to filmmaking are innumerable and in his wake has inspired several contingents of new filmmakers to push the limits in terms of conventions. Anyway, it was yesterday when I rewatched The Shining that a particular question came to my mind - his lighting techniques. I know that Kubricks use of practical lighting was quite groundbreaking, but how much did he actually rely on them to light the entire set (excluding the use of large daylight fixtures for interior day scenes)? Kubrick enjoyed immense creative freedom on his productions and was thus able to reconstruct the entire interior (and parts of the exterior, I believe) of The Overlook Hotel on a soundstage. Please take a look at the still attached. As you can see there are numerous practicals visible, and they are all blown out. Is it reasonable to suggest that all bulbs are a minimum of 1kW? Since the fastest available film stock until 1981 was only 100 ASA, would these practicals have been enough to light the entire scene? And what about the reflection on the floor in the bottom left of the frame? Many thanks in advance!!
  5. Has anyone seen the 1969 version of this movie? I'm quite curious about it but obviously it's not very available. :( Freya
  6. I just watched this video and tought about the story on Kubrick and the candlelit scenes on "Barry Lyndon". What would he be doing with today's cameras and lenses? Of course cinematographers aren't using f0.7 lenses on day to day basis but, for example, Master Primes and Cooke 5 are pretty bright and camera ISO technology are advancing everyday. With a camera capable of a base ISO 5000 and a Master Prime on T1.3 candlelit scenes would be just the start on the cinematography crative process. What do you think?
  7. I'm sure some of you are aware of this very interesting article: http://www.studiodaily.com/2014/01/dp-andrew-shulkind-on-demoing-kubricks-f0-7-lens-kit/ And here is the link to the Kubrick Collection: http://www.kubrickcollection.com/camera-package.html
  8. Does anyone have any information on the range of focal lengths Kubrick used for A Clockwork Orange, Full Metal Jacket, The Shining, and Eyes Wide Shut? What sort of focal length did Kubrick use for close-ups? Thanks
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