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Found 2 results

  1. I shot a short roll of Kodak 500T (16mm). Upon finishing I noticed, much to my dismay, that the ISO on my light meter was set to 50. So, the fast film's exposure index is rated at 500T and I overexposed by how many stops? Can either push or pull (pull, right?) processing save this spool? The negative is probably pretty dense too, right? I saw a latitude test where film was overexposed by 5+ stops and it looked nice. Hoping there's a way to remedy this problem.
  2. Hi guys, so I'm going to shoot a movie for university, and I want to use 25 fps, in order to give the famous "film-look" to the image... my problem is that in some shots I'd like to obtain a depth of field as shallow as possible. So here's my dilemma: they say when you're shooting in 25 fps, the maximum quality of image results in using 50 shutter speed (fps * 2); but if I use 50 shutter speed, then the aperture would be affected: and as you know, in order to obtain a shallow depth of field you should have the aperture all the way open, which in my case, with 50 shutter speed, could result sometime in having an overexposed image. My question is: if I got a good Neutral density filter, a better one than the camera already has, could I succeed in darken the image while using 50 sp and the aperture all the way open? Other tips and recommendations are very well accepted, thank you all for your time and effort in answering my question.
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