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Found 7 results

  1. Hello everyone, If this has been covered in a previous post please link, I was unable to find much on a few cursory searches. I am requesting advice or suggestions for a good lab who I can send Super 8 cartridges to for processing, telecine, and most importantly good quality post and colour grading. I am based in the UK (London). Normally I rely on someone local who hand-process the film and does all the post for me. I have always been very happy with his work, but I'm interested to see what kind of results I can get from a 'lab'. I am aware of Andec in Berlin ( andecfilm.de ) and the S8 Reversal Lab in the Netherlands ( super8.nl ). Though I have no experience with their service or even if they provide a Grading/Post service. Anyway, I am requesting suggestions, based on experience, of good labs. I'm happy to ship internationally NY, LA etc. for good results. Ideally it would stay EU though. Keep in mind, I am not seeking cinematic quality, for me the decision to use Super8 has always been a point a shoot, in camera, portable film format, so I am not seeking perfection. My main concern is over levels of noise and uneven exposures which I feel might be remedied with a higher quality transfer and greater attention to detail in the grading process (never mind my lack of attention to these details during the filming). I sincerely appreciate your advice, suggestions and shared knowledge. All the best
  2. 27-inch iMac with Retina 5K Display Is this a good move? The base model is about $2300 and while I am doing full HD now, I plan to upgrade to 4K at some point. It's not for a job, but I want a powerful processor and if I can use the cloud and/or a seagate external HD for storage, Perhaps this will do nicely? 3.4GHz quad-core Intel i5 and an AMD Radeon Pro 570 with 4GB video memory. Comes with 8GB of RAM as standard, upgradeable to 32GB. Comes with 1TB hard drive on the base model; up to 2TB Fusion Drive on the high-end model. Thanks! dk
  3. Struggling to find any information online about grading a 16mm black and white transfer. I have done grading work but would love some tips on grading 16mm transfer specifically black and white. Any resources would be appreciated.
  4. Hello everyone, My goal for writing this post is to get a better understanding of what goes into achieving a "well balanced" shot. For clarity, I'll lay out the main factors which I believe contribute to the composition of a shot. These are: Physical camera and lens: The desired look and feel of any shot is obviously constrained by the physical tools in use (to an extent). Shooting with different settings on the camera can also either add or take away from a certain look that may be desired. Lighting: I'm under the impression that lighting can make or break a shot, regardless of how expensive the camera used to shoot is. Post: Everything that comes in the editing stage. It seems like a well lit, clean shot is crucial here if the goal is to get the most out of color correcting, and otherwise processing, the footage. How heavily do each of these factors impact the final composition? For example, by percentage, my intuition would be that it's something like: Physical camera and lens (50%) Lighting (40%) Post (10%) Is this about right, or am I way off? I'm guessing this would vary based on the type of shot I was trying to achieve, so for the sake of this post, let's say that I'm specifically talking about achieving a look and feel similar to the screenshot below: This is an image from a film titled The Raid 2. I chose this scene from the movie because I particularly struggle with setting up lighting for night shots. It looks like they did a pretty good job here, without losing any detail or overexposing the image and making it look unnatural. Considering the screenshot above, how much of the look and feel would you say is due to having "the right equipment" vs. having talented and experienced individuals with an in-depth understanding of cinematography. Any input is appreciated!
  5. Hi guys, After watching the excellent THR cinematographers roundtable, I feel compelled to draw more attention to one of the key issues they discuss - the lack of control of the final image in todays modern world of different screens and projector standards. I've been lucky enough to have a few films I've shot recently coloured by Rob Pizzey and Adam Glasman at Co3 in London and we've achieved results I've been delighted with in their colouring sweet, both in the P3 space on their projector, and in Rec709 on their Dolby monitors. The problem however, is when we output to home deliverables in Rec709 h264, the image is so drastically different on my home macbook, iPad, TV that I find when sharing it I'm constantly having to explain and apologise for the final quality. Personally I've found this much less of a problem with DCPs in theatres, but modern displays at home are surely capable of better. It strikes me that rec709 (created in 1990 for TV) surely can't still be the answer for grading to a standard that will look good across all devices. Of course the issue is in two parts here, but is there a push anywhere to standardise a modern colour space and standard across hardware, that can reap the benefits of more dynamic range, contrast and better colour representation? I've heard about rec2020, but as far as I can see this seems to be just for 4K TVs? Would love to hear your thoughts and hopefully there's an answer out there in the works, to ensure a more modern and standardised presentation of the work we do in peoples homes and on their devices. Eben
  6. Gentlemen (and ladies), as some of you know I have shot on film and digital. My first short was shot on super16 way back in 2001 and I had a 35 blowup for festivals. A little trailer I cut in December from an HD scan of our blowup... http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=tMFRPMHTiZ0#! Over the last three years I have shot a number of shorts, some using DSLRS and some 8mm (a format I love). Right now I am in talks with some people about a feature film project and while everyone wants to shoot on the RED EPIC, just because the EPIC is cool and easy and cheap (uh, yeah, ok), I want to shoot one of the three acts on film. The story lends itself to this as we need a different look for each act. I also want to be able to say "we shot on film" not only because it's an interesting talking point, but also because before long I think it won't be possible. What I need to know is this: What would you advise as the cheapest solution and workflow for shooting on Super 16? 35mm is out, naturally, due to cost. I like the look of super 16 and it's easy to find lenses in the NYC area. Back in 2001 when I shot my first short the negatives were processed, given a one light with time code and we edited in AVID. Then the negative was cut AB style and we bypassed creating a positive (because I was out of money) and made a 35mm print from the AB rolls. (For a feature we clearly would not have been able to skip the positive step) It is now my understanding that traditional negative cutting is almost never used today. ??? The people involved with this planned film are almost 100% RED and 5D people and as you can imagine, mostly low low budgeters. Those that have shot on film were not in any way involved with post. So I go to you for ideas! I hear things like, "It's too expensive to scan all that negative and color correct it." So how about photo chemically, like it used to be done? "No that's too expensive too." Etc. etc. Thanks for your help.
  7. Hi, I have a couple of questions for our next (student) short we will be shooting in the first half of April. At first we wanted to go 16mm (anamorphic), but it's quiet expensive for us. And wide angle anamorphic is a problem with 16mm. We're still thinking about it though. But it's probably going to be the digital way. Now the short is about half and half daylight and nighttime. Probably a bit more at daylight. We're thinking about renting a Red-epic since it's a lot cheaper (than an Alexa). But I'm a bit "scared" for the nighttime shots with the epic. We will be passing neon street lights, in car shots which can get pretty dark, etc. What do you think? Will it be ok? Second question is about post production. We love the (16mm) celluloid organic look, and specially for this film. We were wondering how this is professionally emulated/achieved. Are there a couple of ways? I add professionally since we were thinking about festivals etc. (I read somewhere that adding a random grainy look is okay for youtube videos but not for more serious stuff.) Thanks ahead,
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