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Found 9 results

  1. HI all, I am currently working of music video and have various scenes where I need to overlay a computer face on an old monitor in after effects. The problem I have been having is that it looks a bit off to me, which you may be able to see from the example I've attached. I think this is in large part due to the shape which need to be three dimensional not looking right. I have used a bulge effect but doesn't seem to give the impression of a symmetrical rounded shape and I think looks slightly off quilter. If anyone has any ideas of how I could improve this I would be very interested to hear. Thanks.
  2. Hello all, About three years ago, I built a computer to do lower-end editing with Premiere and AfterFX. Most of the projects were geared towards my high school AV class, so nothing more than 5 or so minute works with 1080p project files and H.264 codecs. Today, I'm still using the same project files, but I am editing much larger-scale works (15+ minute works, plus incorporating DaVinci Resolve into my workflow). With my most recent project, I have just color graded via Resolve, and I am finding a lot of difficulty in just opening the Premiere file now. Premiere itself crashes quite frequently, there are times when I open the project file and some of the color graded media is "offline" (when it typically isn't), and I have a hard time rendering this footage for preview (due to Premiere constantly crashing). My workflow is this: Import footage into Premiere, match audio & cut it together -> export XML file -> import XML file of Premiere sequence into DaVinci, color grade the shots -> export H.264 file out of DaVinci, import each shot and replace it's counterpart in Premiere in order to begin sound design Here are the specs for my computer: OS: WIndows 7, 64-bit RAM: 8gb CPU: Intel Core i5 4670K Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660 So my question is, is this a hardware issue, or something in my workflow?
  3. Good evening guys. So, I am looking into optimizing what I get out of my RAW files. And I am not sure I am doing that right now. My workflow now, is 2,5k RAW in Resolve, and then exporting for further editing in Premiere and AFX. What kind of bitrate would you use going from Resolve into Premiere? And what is sufficient for web and cinema use? Thanks!
  4. Hello all, For the current film I'm working on, I had to go through an odd process to do what I needed to it. First, I imported the footage into Premiere so as to trim it down and piece it all together. Then, I opened up After Effects, and imported the project from Premiere into AE so as to do some edits to it that I could only do in this program. Then, after finishing these edits, I opened Premiere back up and imported this AE timeline that I had added the edits to into a timeline on Premiere. Basically, I did all this without ever having to export from a program. Just some specs: I use Windows 7 with 8gb of RAM. Also, the video files I used were ProRes HQ. Everything turned out fine, but there is one inconvenience: when I play the final video in Premiere, it has extremely choppy playback (even on 1/4 quality). I did do some pretty heavy edits to it in After Effects, but my question is, is this the best way to go about doing something like this? Or should I have exported an H.264 file from AE, then import it into Premiere? Thanks a lot! John
  5. This quick tutorial will teach you a very simple technique to batch export multiple clips from Adobe Premiere Pro and CC. If you have any questions feel free to ask.
  6. Hello, I've recently shot a short film on a red epic in 5K raw. I've been told that .RED footage can be directly imported into adobe premiere, but that it would require a powerful system to edit. Is it necessary to have a good system to edit the footage ? And if that is, would I have to transcode the footage into a lower format (such as prores) to be able to edit ? Thank you for your time.
  7. Adobe has made available a substantial update to their CC apps. Highlights include: Output to DCP and AS-11 content packages Enhanced graphics performance, with support for a wider range of GPUs, including GPU debayering for RED media and support for Intel IRIS architecture. Expanded native format support now also includes ARRI Amira, Sony STtP, and broader support for Cinema DNG. https://blogs.adobe.com/premierepro/2014/06/todays-the-day.html
  8. Monte Zucker Photographic Education Presents the Out of Order tour! In Irvine 10/19 And LA 10/20. Out of Order is a film editing tour that is sponsored by Adobe and Canon and tackles editing from the a non-linear storytelling perspective. It’s taught by Ross Hockrow, an award winning filmmaker, educator and author. The full-day class is split in two parts, a daytime Storytelling Through Editing Workshop, and an evening Editing Techniques seminar. In the workshop Ross will demonstrate the principles of “show don’t tell,” will teach you to properly time cuts, to “play” with time, and will focus on the very important concept of pacing. Ross will then break down the techniques necessary to effectively edit a conversation; in film editing, conversations represent what editing is in its rawest form. Finally, Ross will teach you the importance of creating a constant feeling of anticipation within the viewer via cut selection, timing, and analyzing which shots have the greatest storytelling impact. All of these techniques are used to make your viewer experience your film instead of just passively watching it. The seminar begins with an intensive, step-by-step overview of the complete editing process. Ross shows students how to organize and log footage and introduces the concept of the dump timeline, a workflow technique used to create the Narrative Base. The art of the professional cut is explored in detail, focusing on the techniques of L-cutting, cutting on the action, popcorn cutting, and the use of natural and scene-to-scene transitions. Check out this awesome opportunity to hone your skills or gain a new take on the editing process.
  9. Monte Zucker Photographic Education Presents the Out of Order tour! In San Jose 10/12 And San Francisco 10/13. Out of Order is a film editing tour that is sponsored by Adobe and Canon and tackles editing from the a non-linear storytelling perspective. It’s taught by Ross Hockrow, an award winning filmmaker, educator and author. The full-day class is split in two parts, a daytime Storytelling Through Editing Workshop, and an evening Editing Techniques seminar. In the workshop Ross will demonstrate the principles of “show don’t tell,” will teach you to properly time cuts, to “play” with time, and will focus on the very important concept of pacing. Ross will then break down the techniques necessary to effectively edit a conversation; in film editing, conversations represent what editing is in its rawest form. Finally, Ross will teach you the importance of creating a constant feeling of anticipation within the viewer via cut selection, timing, and analyzing which shots have the greatest storytelling impact. All of these techniques are used to make your viewer experience your film instead of just passively watching it. The seminar begins with an intensive, step-by-step overview of the complete editing process. Ross shows students how to organize and log footage and introduces the concept of the dump timeline, a workflow technique used to create the Narrative Base. The art of the professional cut is explored in detail, focusing on the techniques of L-cutting, cutting on the action, popcorn cutting, and the use of natural and scene-to-scene transitions. Check out this awesome opportunity to hone your skills or gain a new take on the editing process.
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