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Found 5 results

  1. I hope this is the correct forum for my question. I'm using a Panasonic GH5 with V-log L. I'm a bit confused on using V-log L. I was told that the reason for using log in general is to save the highlights (especially the sky in outdoor shoots). But in most forums, they are advising to over expose the shot to get rid of the noise in the shadows. But doing this blows out the skies. Therefore, I think there is no sense in shooting with log. Just shoot with a standard profile and light the scene correctly as v-log can't save both highlights and and shadows at the same time. The problem is, it's not easy to do this when shooting outdoors run and gun in the morning when the sky is in the shot. Am I thinking correctly or am I missing something? Thanks! God bless!
  2. Lots of discussion on the why of shooting with an iPhone, but I'm wondering about how. As in how do you create lighting that will let you get a good meaty picture and lots of subject separation using an iPhone. Expressiveness is a topic for another day. Specifically where would you start with light levels, ratios, color temps, and the rest? I presume you would set light levels so the camera could be shot at its native ISO value, but beyond that: Would you go very hard source light? Ultra diffused? Religiously keep your ratios at 2:1 or eliminate the fill and let the shadows fall where they may? How about colors? With the limitations of the iPhone sensor would it be best to define shapes with contrasting colors (solid-colored costumes against relatively plain cool backgrounds) or would it be better to keep everything homogeneous (beige on beige on beige).
  3. Hello group! Just finished watching the great Wes Anderson film: "Moonrise Kingdom" (2012), which - according to IMDb - was all shot on Kodak Vision 3 200T Super 16mm (A-Minima and Aaton Xtera). It looks fantastic IMHO. I wonder how the night scenes were done. These look underexposed on purpose, which of course is the correct choice, but I can see no coarser grain anywhere. Was it perhaps exposed correctly and darkened in post (or pull processed)? The grain pattern is really nice and very even throughout the movie (it seems to have a few zoomed-in shots done in post, making it just a bit softer, but not grainier). Text and graphics (inserts) seem to be all shot or done (computer graphics) on digital, which I think is O.K. (better than with added fake film grain which doesn't quite match the real deal). Also: does anyone have the information if the V3 200T in daylight was used with an 85 type filter (or gel) or color corrected in post? Any information regarding avoiding excessive grain in the shadows with 16mm Vision 3 color film stock highly appreciated. Thanks in advance, Christian
  4. I'll be shooting soon a short film (as DP), and I only have a small amount of choices in term of which camera I can use. I was wondering if anyone has personal experience to share as for how these cameras work in a low key light system, which of these cameras render the black at the best, with which one we can play with sort of gamma settings so as we can get a good latitude? I also have the opportunity to work with Panasonic AF101, but I don't like codec so much beside the fact it crashes the highlights very quickly and can't go beyond 2 stops 2 stops and a half in the blacks, so I was wondering if actually opt to shot with a DSLR. Any ideas? What about how each of them react in a low light situation, if I have to compare these cameras? CANON 5D Mark3 SONY A7s AF101 thank you so much!
  5. NOTE: I think this could be a broad question, and most people (I hope) will have something to say but admins feel free to relocate this thread if it doesn't belong here. I'm writing a paper temporarily entitled 'Aesthetics in the Absence of Light: Storytelling Through Shadows' and have purchased several books on the film noir and horror genres and on film lighting in general. I'm finding, however, that the films referred to in the books are either too obscure and not great films or the few obvious choices. I can't watch every film in existence looking for shots that utilise shadows effectively and originally but perhaps some users on here can steer me in the right direction and could recommend a film I might have missed that has a relevant scene in it somewhere, a film that doesn't necessarily fall into the noir or horror genres, but is recognised and respected. Any help would be much appreciated, Thanks, Stephen
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