Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest Ningun

AGDVX100P to edit

Recommended Posts

Guest Ningun

When I shoot in 24p with the new Panasonic, the scene files - F5 24, F6 24 advanced - tell me I'm shooting in 24. But when I capture in either Final Cut Pro or Avid XpressPro, the only options are for 23.987. Is this the same thing? I'm new at DV (in past I used 16film) and don't want to commit a lot of time doing the wrong thing.

Thanks,

 

Dave

 

davidroehm@hotmail.com

www.ningun.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NTSC runs at 29.97fps, and because the DVX records out to NTSC, its 24fps stream must be at 23.987fps to "match." These not-quite-whole-numbers are called "Drop Frame."

 

Thus, importing at 23.987fps would be okay, since the actual stream is running at that speed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alvin,

 

Please correct me if I'm wrong. I thought the DVX-100 recorded on NDF 'only' while in 24p mode.

 

Is that wrong?

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Please correct me if I'm wrong. I thought the DVX-100 recorded on NDF 'only' while in 24p mode.

I did some googling on the topic, and half of the websites say that the DVX actually records at 23.98fps to comply with NTSC standards, since the signal on tape is not a 24P stream, but rather your standard NTSC signal consisting of 24fps with 3:2-pulldown.

 

However, other websites claim that the camera actually records NDF in order to "comply with 24P standards," whatever that means.

 

Now I'm just confused. But really, would it make all that big of a difference capturing a NDF signal with DF settings? I haven't really looked into it since it's not a problem I've had to deal with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

23.97 refers to the speed of the frame rate only and that's what the DVX100 records. Drop Frame and NonDrop Frame have to do with the counting of the timecode and having nothing to do with the actual frame rate. In 24p (actually 23.97) the camera only uses NonDrop timecode so that the numbers are a continuous stream, making for easier frame flagging if one wishes to extract the 24 individual progressive frames from the 60i signal.

 

One can have many frame rates and they can be in Drop and NonDrop timecode. This is a very common misunderstanding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Drop Frame and NonDrop Frame have to do with the counting of the timecode and having nothing to do with the actual frame rate.

Ahh, thanks for clearing that up, Mitch. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.adamwilt.com/24p/index.html

 

This shows the main difference between the Standard and Advanced modes of the dvx100. Also more information on the capture rates/modes.

 

One thing I alway keep in mind is that the "DV" codec is not flexiable like other computer video codecs. The bitrate that DV runs at is a constant and connot be change, so look at it like a filmstock, you can record what you want to it, but the imformation will recorded to file in the DV formating. This is because video compression is handled by a Digital Signal PRocessor that is pogrammed to do only one thing very well. So all image processing needs to be done before it hits the DV DSP, comformed to DV's 30i (or 60i depending how you look at things) standard, and is output to tape. When footage is recorded to tape in Advanced mode, it is the NLE plug-in that mothodically removes extra "blank" information from the DV data stream.

 

It is only recently that JVC has started to include a new file format that can be written to mini-dv tape with its HDV camcorder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Magic Bullet Software

 

I have used the Magic Bullet Software and it does a very cool job of creating a film look. The software looks at your video as if it were origenally shot on film; by de-interlacing the footage, performing a reverse 3:2 pulldown, then adding color filters and other aspects to the image based on prameters you select from thier library of settings. This plug-in was orgenally created to assist people doing high end compositing and solve other post production problems that come from using consumer DV footage. One thing to keep in mind is that by using the Magic Bullet and then going back to DV tape, you are going to recompress all your footage which is already compressed 5:1, so you might increase your compression artifacts in the final footage. This may or may not be a problem for you, depending on how good video gear you are displaying on is.

 

A

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  


  • Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS



    Visual Products



    Ritter Battery



    The Original Slider



    G-Force Grips



    Rig Wheels Passport



    FJS International



    Broadcast Solutions Inc



    Just Cinema Gear



    Abel Cine



    Tai Audio



    CineLab



    Glidecam



    Paralinx LLC



    Metropolis Post



    Serious Gear



    New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment



    Wooden Camera



    Gamma Ray Digital Inc


    Cinematography Books and Gear
×
×
  • Create New...