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Dan Goldberg

500, 1000, 2000fps

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Hey all,

 

This is likely a fairly straight-forward question, and although I'm not a beginning filmmaker per-say, I know little on the topic of "high-speed shooting".

 

I recently purchased a DVX100B and I think I am in love :rolleyes: . However, I noticed the capability of shooting 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 fps. I was wondering when you would use these high-speed framerates and what effect it gives. I understand the need for more light the faster the frame rate, but I am unsure of what each framerate's benefit is and what effect it could give.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance! :)

 

Dan Goldberg..

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Those aren't framerates. Those are shutter speeds.

 

The significance of framerate is in speed manipulation. Since everything is projected at 24fps in america, shooting at less than 24fps give you a fast-motion effect and shooting more than 24fps gives slow motion. 1000fps will stretch one second of real time into about 40 seconds of screen time.

Edited by Chris Keth

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Where did it say fps on the camera? I am kind of confused by that question, sorry. From what I understand those are 1/500, 1/1000 etc. of a second not 1000 frames per second. So this would be comparable to the time that a film shutter would be open (depending on the shutter angle) rather than how many are exposed in a second...

 

right?

Edited by Patrick McGowan

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Those aren't framerates. Those are shutter speeds.

 

From what I understand those are 1/500, 1/1000 etc. of a second not 1000 frames per second.

 

:unsure:

 

Yikes, I goofed.

 

I meant shutter speeds yes. I'ms orry if I confused people, I wasn't thinking straight :blink:

 

Thanks for the help, both of you.

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They do shoot those kind of FPS for sientific research, specialty photograpy like the bullet spliting the playing card or going through the apple so they're not NESESSARILY shutter speeds. :D

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They do shoot those kind of FPS for sientific research, specialty photograpy like the bullet spliting the playing card or going through the apple so they're not NESESSARILY shutter speeds. :D

 

Hi,

 

I tested the Phantom HD last week, just pouring milk on cornflakes @1000 fps looks very cool! Changes in peoples faces as they talk is really weird.

 

Stephen

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They do shoot those kind of FPS for sientific research, specialty photograpy like the bullet spliting the playing card or going through the apple so they're not NESESSARILY shutter speeds. :D

 

True, some camera can do that but a DVX is not that animal ;)

 

There's a prof here at RIT who's well known for special effects photography. He does a class every year where they do things like shoot a bullet hitting an apple, spliting a card, popping a balloon, et cetera. Very cool stuff. He invented an electronic shutter that works down to something like 1/100,000th of a second.

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So are those shutter speeds, 500, 1000, and 2000 specifically for slow motion effect? Or are there other effects or benefits of those speeds?

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1/48 is the standard film shutter speed for 24 fps (realtime). On a video camera, you can set it higher for a smoother immage (less moion blurr, but I find motion blurr contributes to the film look) but ou will need to open the iris more.

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1/48 is the standard film shutter speed for 24 fps (realtime). On a video camera, you can set it higher for a smoother immage (less moion blurr, but I find motion blurr contributes to the film look) but ou will need to open the iris more.

Back up a second. A higher shutter speed will not make a smoother image. It will make a choppier-looking image. Motion blur is integral to a "smooth" image and is a big part of the look of film.

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Yeah, because it simulates a shorter shutter opening time which cuts quite a bit of light and increases strobing. The strobing is what looks choppy, but the number of shutter intervals makes the image look super sharp as it captures the motion of an object very clearly.

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So are those shutter speeds, 500, 1000, and 2000 specifically for slow motion effect? Or are there other effects or benefits of those speeds?

 

 

I use 1/50th(PAL) for normal shooting and 1/1000th for slow motion(depending on light). If you run a test, you'll see shooting at a much higher shutter speed will give you far better slow motion. I'm not sure of the other uses for such high shutter speeds.

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i see. thanks so much for the help ;)

 

any other uses for higher shutter speeds? other than good slow motion capabilities? just wondering :P

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"any other uses for higher shutter speeds?"

 

Producing sharper looking footage of fast moving subjects like motor sports. There would be less blur. However, as others have said, you do run the risk of ending up with footage that will not look entirely smooth with regular frame rate shooting - 25fps / 30fps etc.

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