Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
richard worth

just starting out

Recommended Posts

I have recently been given the chance to grip on my firts feature film but I have only been a grip once on a very low budget film. Basically I'm just looking for a few of the basic do's and don'ts I'm pretty confident with the equipment I'm using but I've never worked on a film with this kind of budget and presure. A few website links, tools that are always useful you know that sort of thing. PLEASE HELP. Shooting starts on the 17.09.2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably the most important thing is to simply honestly tell your HoD what you know and what you don't know beforehand!

If you do this and if he is at least a half decent human being, he will take a bit of care of you and you will learn as you go along.

If you won't follow this advice you might get into tricky a situation earlier or later...

Edited by Alex Haspel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out www.rondexter.com . Get a copy of "ulva's grip handbook". It is a fantasic read. I have it in my bathroom and take it with me on all my jobs.

 

Admit your shortcomings.

Be confident b/c you got hired.

ask questions.

be polite.

dont be afraid of hard work.

be able to be proud of the job you have done ( dont do things you wouldnt be proud of)

dont kill yourself nor others.

dont go for a crate of t-stops

Safety is everyones responsibility.

keep things clean and organized.

if you find yourself not doing things clean, sort, organize.

dont talk on your cell infront of a producer. PERIOD

dont sit on an applebox in view of a producer, unless you are doing something.

be a ninja (quiet, quick, and precise)

 

Good luck and let us know how it goes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

righty-tighty, lefty-loosey.

 

no running on set.

 

don't try to be a hero and show everyone how many sandbags you can pile on your shoulders.

 

don't double handle items.

 

count to ten ...

 

do your work at a comfortable working height, and/or in a comfortable body position.

 

do not stand on the tops of ladders.

 

put tools away immediately.

 

learn the dimensions of the apple box (8", 12", 20")

 

bend at the knees (except for the producer.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Check out www.rondexter.com . Get a copy of "ulva's grip handbook". It is a fantasic read. I have it in my bathroom and take it with me on all my jobs.

 

Admit your shortcomings.

Be confident b/c you got hired.

ask questions.

be polite.

dont be afraid of hard work.

be able to be proud of the job you have done ( dont do things you wouldnt be proud of)

dont kill yourself nor others.

dont go for a crate of t-stops

Safety is everyones responsibility.

keep things clean and organized.

if you find yourself not doing things clean, sort, organize.

dont talk on your cell infront of a producer. PERIOD

dont sit on an applebox in view of a producer, unless you are doing something.

be a ninja (quiet, quick, and precise)

 

Good luck and let us know how it goes.

 

 

Good Call.

 

One thing I heard that took me a while to understand (it works with tight knit groups) is being Pro-active. Anticipate what will go wrong, so you can fix it now. If cables are being run sloppily, let the electrics know about it, and if you are able to, grab some rubber matting and cover up a heavy foot access area. Do things like that, quiet and quick, but within your boundaries, and people will notice.

 

Always stay positive, and humble yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have any issues which are liable to cause problems later on which you need someone else's help or permission to fix, send email, write notes, stick post-its, but GET IT IN WRITING.

 

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out www.rondexter.com . Get a copy of "ulva's grip handbook". It is a fantasic read. I have it in my bathroom and take it with me on all my jobs.

 

that was a very good link duke has many many thinks to learn or to freshing your memory nice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dont go for a crate of t-stops

 

That's a good one Rob... :lol:

 

I like to add the two important things

Follow instructions

& don't be afraid of making first time mistakes (it's a learning process)

 

As for tools the most common for grips are

Gloves

Knife (a good utility knife is best)

Wrench

Tape measure

Small Level

 

the rest you'll get as you need.

 

Anyways Richard you've been on the show for a over week now

How is the project going?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The key is anticipation. If a light goes up, be ready with any flags or stands that it might need. If it's your first feature as a grip, you probably haven't developed the eye for lighting to know when a light will need a topper, sider, lenser, etc. The main thing for you would be to know the equipment and as much about it as you can. Get a catalogue from Matthews, or American if you can and study it. Learn names and what each piece looks like. It will seem like a lot to digest and it is, so don't get discouraged. Gripping involves a lot of areas so just do the best you can and try to absorb what you can. For now, I would do the basics: If a light goes up, have at least a flag and stand set aside ready to run it in. If your key is setting something, make sure he has a shotbag, if dolly track is being laid, know where the wedges are and be ready with them. Above all, ask questions. We all started where you are now. Have fun. If you get sent to the truck for a "board stretcher" they are usually kept in the jockey boxes.

Good Luck,

ghard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  


  • Wooden Camera



    Metropolis Post



    CineLab



    New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment



    Abel Cine



    Broadcast Solutions Inc



    Serious Gear



    Gamma Ray Digital Inc



    G-Force Grips



    Paralinx LLC



    Visual Products



    Just Cinema Gear



    Glidecam



    Ritter Battery



    FJS International



    Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS



    Tai Audio



    Rig Wheels Passport


×
×
  • Create New...