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Chris Dingley1

shooting with a fuji stock.. non calibration

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I am shooting with an arri sr 2 or 3 (super 16) with a fuji stock. but i heard you need to calibrate the camera to shoot with the fuji film. If i don't calibrate whats the worst thing that could happen to the film/ camera.

 

thanks

Edited by Chris Dingley1

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I am shooting with an arri sr 2 or 3 (super 16) with a fuji stock. but i heard you need to calibrate the camera to shoot with the fuji film. If i don't calibrate whats the worst thing that could happen to the film/ camera.

 

thanks

 

Hi,

 

Sounds like BS to me.

 

Stephen

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but i heard you need to calibrate the camera to shoot with the fuji film.

 

Are you sure it wasn't the difference between standard 16 and super 16 they were referring to? There are some standard 16 SR2's out there.

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Some people used to have theories that Fuji's emulsion was especially thicker than Kodak's, so it ran through the camera a little louder. But as far as calibrating a camera for it...sounds like someone is pulling your leg for a good laugh.

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The only thing you'd need to calibrate it for would be if you were actually going to be using the ArriCode timecode system or (in the case of the older models) the in-finder light meter. But no, otherwise, there should be no operational difference between Kodak and Fuji.

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I am shooting with an arri sr 2 or 3 (super 16) with a fuji stock. but i heard you need to calibrate the camera to shoot with the fuji film. If i don't calibrate whats the worst thing that could happen to the film/ camera.

 

thanks

 

Are you sure they weren't maybe talking about pitch adjustment. I am not too familiar with the SR3 but my understanding (which could be wrong) was that you could adjust the pitch in the movement to quiet the camera when using film stocks that had slightly different dimensions. Maybe they were talking about that as "calibrating" the camera.

 

Just a thought,

-Tim

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I am not too familiar with the SR3 but my understanding (which could be wrong) was that you could adjust the pitch in the movement to quiet the camera when using film stocks that had slightly different dimensions.

 

The pitch adjustment is on the "dumb" side; however, it tends to get used less than on 35mm cameras largely bc the film isn't moving as fast, so the camera has less ability to make such a racket. There are other reasons of course, involving movement design, and sometimes it's loud anyway, hence the need for 16mm pitch adjustment. But I'd say it doesn't get used nearly as much as 35mm cameras need it.

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