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Tom Lowe

Terrence Malick & Lubezki shooting on RED... Tree of Life

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http://www.reduser.net/forum/showthread.php?t=14519

 

The guy who made the post is very credible. Malick is really the greatest living visual poet we have right now since the passing of directors like Kubrick and Kurosawa, so if Malick and Lubezki have been shooting on RED, it's definitely an interesting development. I can see why a camera like RED would appeal to Malick - since he is known to keep the camera rolling almost continuously, shooting miles and miles of film, which probably account for a disproportionately large part of his budget.

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http://www.reduser.net/forum/showthread.php?t=14519

 

The guy who made the post is very credible. Malick is really the greatest living visual poet we have right now since the passing of directors like Kubrick and Kurosawa, so if Malick and Lubezki have been shooting on RED, it's definitely an interesting development. I can see why a camera like RED would appeal to Malick - since he is known to keep the camera rolling almost continuously, shooting miles and miles of film, which probably account for a disproportionately large part of his budget.

 

I think Lubezki and Malick collaborated on the "The New World" also, which IMHO was a huge disappointment, especially after Terrance Malick's "The Thin Red Line" was marvelously and amazingly done. I think Malick got carried away by the sentiments of "The Thin Red Line" and did not offer public any new insight into his philosophy. I hope that this time he offers something more.

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The post also makes it clear that they've mainly shot on film.

 

Yes, sorry, I should have made it more clear for people who don't actually read the link. It sounds like a very small percentage of the shots are being done with RED.

 

DJ Joofa, I know a lot of people who would disagree with you about The New World being a "huge disappointment."

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I think Lubezki and Malick collaborated on the "The New World" also, which IMHO was a huge disappointment, especially after Terrance Malick's "The Thin Red Line" was marvelously and amazingly done. I think Malick got carried away by the sentiments of "The Thin Red Line" and did not offer public any new insight into his philosophy. I hope that this time he offers something more.

 

 

I personally was amazed by The New World.

 

It is so deep, that I think it's early for me to make a more detailed comment about it.

 

But I was just... amazed. It kept me thinking for hours and not many movies have such effect on me.

 

There were, of course, a few things that I didn't like, but in general - it was a special experience watching this film.

 

Visually, it is one of the most beautifully-shot films I've seen in my life. For that I'm sure.

 

Just adding my 2c to the thread.

 

The fact that artists of this kind choose Red [even only for a few shots] says a lot.

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The fact that artists of this kind choose Red [even only for a few shots] says a lot.

Yeah... It says they wanted a different look on a few shots.

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I think Lubezki and Malick collaborated on the "The New World" also, which IMHO was a huge disappointment, especially after Terrance Malick's "The Thin Red Line" was marvelously and amazingly done.

 

I re-read my above statement and thought it was a little ambiguous because of the wording. I am not saying that Lubezki and Malick collaboration was disappointing in the "The New World"; the film was very beautiful as far as cinematography was concerned; what I am saying is that the film itself was big disappointment for me.

 

As I mentioned before, Malick should have gone farther than "The Thin Redline" -- which I really liked. However, I think he just rehashed some of his existing philosophy and hardly provided any new insights into his own development as a philosopher and thinker. I thought that "The New World" was just beautiful images stitched together. Little new over "Thin Red Line" to remember and write home about as far as offering visibility into the director's world view for which he is well-known.

 

I really think the movie was rushed through and hurriedly done. Additionally, IMHO Collin Farrell was a poor choice.

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An even more interesting development is when a new camera is used on a second project as the A camera by a DP or director.

 

 

 

 

Mike Brennan

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I re-read my above statement and thought it was a little ambiguous because of the wording. I am not saying that Lubezki and Malick collaboration was disappointing in the "The New World"; the film was very beautiful as far as cinematography was concerned; what I am saying is that the film itself was big disappointment for me.

 

As I mentioned before, Malick should have gone farther than "The Thin Redline" -- which I really liked. However, I think he just rehashed some of his existing philosophy and hardly provided any new insights into his own development as a philosopher and thinker. I thought that "The New World" was just beautiful images stitched together. Little new over "Thin Red Line" to remember and write home about as far as offering visibility into the director's world view for which he is well-known.

 

I really think the movie was rushed through and hurriedly done. Additionally, IMHO Collin Farrell was a poor choice.

 

I will have to disagree with you. The New World can be boiled down to a choice - to live a "false" or a "true" life. Smith ultimately makes the wrong choice, in Malick's view (and in mine). "That fort is not the world. The river leads back there. It leads onward too...deeper. Into the wild. Start over. Exchange this false life for a true one. Give up the name of Smith..." Such a dilema could not be more relevant to today's world, and the issue could not possibly be more beautifully framed and explored. That is at the heart of what Malick is trying to say with this picture. You might not have gotten much out of the movie, but many people did. That doesn't make one person right or wrong. Art speaks to people differently, for different reasons.

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That doesn't make one person right or wrong. Art speaks to people differently, for different reasons.

 

Yes I agree with you regarding art.

 

I have huge respect for Terrence Malick. When I saw "The Thin Red Line" I thought that this is the best movie I ever saw -- I saw it about 20 times in a theater and countlessly on VHS/DVD. Every time I would get an interesting new meaning. I don't know if I still qualify "The Thin Red Line" as the best movie I have ever seen, but it is certainly in the top 5. "Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon" is also there in the top 5. I thought "Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon" was also amazingly philosophical. There is so much Eastern philosophy in it that it is an awesome piece of art.

 

While Malick's philosophy is secular in nature in "The Thin Red Line", the thought process in "Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon" is very spiritual.

Edited by DJ Joofa

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I don't know anyone who could watch The Thin Red Line or The New World and NOT think these are spiritual films. Terry's films are the most transcendent and spiritual I have ever seen.

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I don't know anyone who could watch The Thin Red Line or The New World and NOT think these are spiritual films. Terry's films are the most transcendent and spiritual I have ever seen.

Including Tarkowski, Bresson, Dreyer and Angelopoulos?

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I don't know anyone who could watch The Thin Red Line or The New World and NOT think these are spiritual films. Terry's films are the most transcendent and spiritual I have ever seen.

I saw The Thin Red Line in a theater with about ten people, and of those ten only myself and one other person thought it was anything other that complete crap. I love the film, as many do, but I think many more just don't get it.

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I saw The Thin Red Line in a theater with about ten people, and of those ten only myself and one other person thought it was anything other that complete crap. I love the film, as many do, but I think many more just don't get it.

 

Well, 90% of Americans would rather listen to Britney Spears than Chopin. So go figure. :)

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Well, 90% of Americans would rather listen to Britney Spears than Chopin. So go figure. :)

 

It's no wonder! Fryderyk Chopin was a self-important, overtly ornate, blaggard who was in love with a woman named 'George.' :lol:

 

Just teasing, I love Chopin...although he was in love with a woman named George.

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An even more interesting development is when a new camera is used on a second project as the A camera by a DP or director.

Mike Brennan

As George Lucas did (n't) with Panavision's CineAltas when he shot Revenge of the Sith :lol:

 

And Sony even had ads in the trade press about it which were almost word-for-word identical to the ones they had a couple of years earlier for Attack of the Clones, except they basically crossed out "F900" and "Panavision", and wrote in "F950" and "Plus8Digital". I thought it was some sort of joke when I first saw it :rolleyes:

 

But yes, technology is like a restaurant. Success is not measured by the opening night's takings, it's measured by how many customers come back for more.

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