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Sasithorn Ariyavicha

Do Plus-X & Tri-X disable 85 internal filter of Nikon R10?

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Hi again,

 

I want to use the filter to enhance the contrast & make the sky darker for B&W. A roll of Plus-X is in the slot and the filter key inserted. The batteries are loaded and the camera is on Run mode. I also slightly press the trigger to activate the light meter. But the internal light meter does not change.

 

Does Plus-X (and Tri-X) disble the filter?

 

Also, should I worry about using the filter to achieve this effect or could I simply fix it later in Post (with After Affects, for example)?

 

Thanks in advance.

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Does Plus-X (and Tri-X) disble the filter?

 

I used plenty Tri-X with a leicina special, I still was able to engage or disengage the filter manually, no idea how it does on a R10.

 

For contrast and dark sky a red filter gives good results. For b/w with Tri-X in daylight I always have a dark red filter on. Somehow the internal lightmeter seems to be more sensible for red light or the film is less, I have to overexpose quiet a bit to get best results.

 

Cheers, Bernhard

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B&W cartridges are Daylight balanced, so the internal filter is always disabled. It pushes the pin in to take the filter away, so I doubt there is a way to put the filter again in place if the cartridge is Daylight and pushing the pin. In normal cameras (say Canons) you cannot do this, unless you cut a piece of the cartridge to make it Tungsten.

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Reading the Nikon R10 manual, I understand you can only disable the filter if a Tungsten film cartridge is in, and there's no alternative with Daylight films such as Plus-X: the internal filter will always be out.

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to enhance the contrast & make the sky darker for B&W.

 

Also, should I worry about using the filter to achieve this effect or could I simply fix it later in Post (with After Affects, for example)?

 

to come back to this part of the question.

 

Once your sky is white it's hard to darken it in post and get nice contrast in the clouds. It looks much better done in-camera.

 

Using a 85 in B/W gives only a very subtle effect, a red filter will do the trick better. The darker it is (lower pass) the stronger the effect.

 

For maximum contrast sky you can add polarisation over the red. Thus it can be hard to get a reasonable f-stop.

 

Bernhard

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