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Guest Christian Film Project

Finding a girly DP!

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Guest Christian Film Project

Hey,

 

May sound like a stange post but I am working on a project that you would normally categorize as a "Chick Flick". I am looking for a female cinematographer because I feel this project needs a 'woman's touch'. Do they exist? I am based in Canada. If girls want to become DP's so bad how do I find them?

 

Chris

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I have met one who I hear is excellent; her name is Laura Beth Love. She's working on "Return of Pink 5", and I've heard nothing but good things. I'll alert her about this post and we can see if she responds.

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You can always check with the Cinematographers Guild in Los Angeles. They have several members who although part of the union as camera assistants or camera operators are very talented up and coming cinematographers in their own right.

 

Three names come to mind, all of them are professional, award winning cinematographers:

 

Mariana Sanchex de Antuñano

 

Lisa Weigand

 

Jessica Gallant

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Guest Sean McVeigh
Hey,

 

May sound like a stange post but I am working on a project that you would normally categorize as a "Chick Flick". I am looking for a female cinematographer because I feel this project needs a  'woman's touch'. Do they exist? I am based in Canada. If girls want to become DP's so bad how do I find them?

 

You can try the CSC. Check out the 'find a member' section. Alternately, check with the local film co-op where you are located.

 

Sean

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If girls want to become DP's so bad how do I find them?

I expect you could look in the same place as you look for "boys" who want to become DPs. Check with your local directories, agencies and crew booking services. Maybe the CSC can help.

 

There are probably branches of WIFT in your area too.

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I applaud your openness to hiring woman cinematographers and there are indeed many fine female DP?s. But your choice of DP should be based and the quality of their work, their reputation and a connection they have with you and the project. I feel sex, race, ethnicity, and sexual preference really shouldn?t factor into the equation.

Edited by bob1dp

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I applaud your openness to hiring woman cinematographers and there are indeed many fine female DP?s. But your choice of DP should be based and the quality of their work, their reputation and a connection they have with you and the project.  I feel sex, race, ethnicity, and sexual preference really shouldn?t factor into the equation.

 

 

That's true. What he said was that he wanted a DP with a "woman's touch." There are indeed many men who are much more in touch with their womanhood than some women.

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Uta Briesewitz, Director of Photography

HBO- "The Wire"

Feature- "Homeless to Harvard"

Currently in production on the television series "LAX",NBC.

 

Greg Gross

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Uta Briesewitz, Director of Photography

...Currently in production on the television series "LAX",NBC.

 

                                          Greg Gross

 

 

FYI, NBC cancelled "LAX" so the show is no longer in production.

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Guest Frank Gossimier

Hey Phil, this is one of your most humourous posts....

 

"I'm sure there's laws that prohibit this kind of discrimination both in the US and Canada."

 

Certainly in Canada discrimination against any white male is 100% perfectly, LEGAL. White males have no protection at all, especially in entertainment related jobs.

 

You can't post a job opening that says, "White males only need apply." You can certainly post a job that says, "women only need apply." I've seen many.

 

On the other hand what's the big deal? Have you watched the end credits of a TV show or movie lately? Not many female names in the list so it does not seem to be damaging us at all.

 

Women now dominate the casting directors role, but that's it.

 

Film making is still a man's game.

 

Frank

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Not many female names in the list so it does not seem to be damaging us at all.
On the contrary I'd say we are [i]all [/i]damaged if half of the population faces attitudes like this as a barrier to their progress. Who can tell how many more triumphs of cinematography we might be able to see if both sexes had equal opportunity?

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Guest Frank Gossimier

Don't you find it odd Dominic that no one EVER complains when men are held back from progressing in a field?

 

Do you ever hear of politicians campaining for justice for men?

 

How well do men progress in the nursing field? Or elementary education?

 

Look at the divorce laws of Canada and the USA, how well do men do there?

 

Fact is women are given a lot of "advantages" over men. There are all kinds of organizations dedicated to advancing women in film and TV over men.

 

Any male organization that did the same thing for men would be called discriminatory, yet it's fine for women.

 

Women are now facing a backlash in the film and TV industry from men who resent losing out on work to women, just because they are women.

 

What's wrong with having the DP position being mostly male? Come on, how many female auto mechanics have you seen in your life? No one complains about this...how many women seriously have any interest in being an auto mechanic? Not many are interested in being DPs either.

 

Frank

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Have you tried your local film co-op. Were are you based out of in Canada, i know of most of the co-ops in Canada and might be able to point you in the right direction if you have not already tried .

 

I join the average option here and feel that someones sex has nothing to do with there skill. Amelie was made by two guys and thats a chick flick.

 

But there is something to be sad for movies like eternal sunshine of the spotless mind and what might have been lost or added if shot by a male. Ellen Kuras is a amazing cinematographer and i don't think anything should have been changed. You must look at the skill and experience he or she has too offer your film even if your planing to shot DV . You never know,you might find a male that shares your vision for the film.

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Don't you find it odd Dominic that no one EVER complains when men are held back from progressing in a field? 

 

Do you ever hear of politicians campaining for justice for men?

 

How well do men progress in the nursing field? Or elementary education?

 

Look at the divorce laws of Canada and the USA, how well do men do there?

 

Fact is women are given a lot of "advantages" over men.  There are all kinds of organizations dedicated to advancing women in film and TV over men.

 

Any male organization that did the same thing for men would be called discriminatory, yet it's fine for women.

 

Women are now facing a backlash in the film and TV industry from men who resent losing out on work to women, just because they are women.

 

What's wrong with having the DP position being mostly male?  Come on, how many female auto mechanics have you seen in your life?  No one complains about this...how many women seriously have any interest in being an auto mechanic? Not many are interested in being DPs either.

 

Frank

One day, hopefully in my lifetime, the world will stop producing men with your mentality. Though I doubt it.

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Hm...I think I posted somewhere recently about being involved in the film world as a woman. Wherever that post is, it may provide some insights. For now, let me just play devil's advocate with Frank a bit.

 

You've got a point. Men never complain about, "I didn't get hired for that job because I'm a man!" and this and that. And I'm not even going to go as far as saying "that's because it doesn't happen"; I'm sure it does. Gender discrimination occurs on both sides.

 

BUT think about this for a second. I'm almost 23. It has taken me longer than a decade to truly feel confident about who I am because for so many of those years, I was constantly doing (and continue to do) things that girls "wouldn't want to do" or "aren't supposed to do" and other dangerous social stereotypes. Skateboarding, snowboarding, playing guitar, starting an electronic music project, working with power tools, cutting my hair short, climbing trees, wearing baggy pants, getting tattoos, dying my hair blue. You name it, I've been there, and I can tell you that chances are it's not entirely representative of "girly" activities.

 

Well, everything I have done in my life has been worth it to me as a part of my life and of who I am, whether or not any other girl would want to do it, or whether or not I was "supposed to" be doing it. And I wouldn't do anything any differently, because then I wouldn't be me! I don't know if you truly will understand this because you're not a woman, but for whatever reason, there have been these invisible rules in society about how women are supposed to act, what they're supposed to do, and so on. The rules are there for men too, but somehow those rules have not affected how/if men get jobs and what jobs they are. Why does this happen? I have no idea. I don't consider myself a feminist in the bra-burning Down With the Patriarchy type of way, but I like to think there are younger women out there who might look up to me someday for saying to hell with stereotypes and just doing it anyway.

 

That's just me, maybe it's true that no woman in her right mind would want to be a DP, but dammit, take a look at some statistics and read up on some history, and then tell me about how once upon a time, no woman wanted to be a doctor either...or to go to college...or learn to read...or vote.

 

:shrug: So yeah, I must be out of my mind for wanting to be a camera operator, or work in a rental house... :P (although I'm sure there are men here too who often feel that way...!)

 

p.s. I promise I won't steal any jobs from anyone simply because I look better in a skirt!

Edited by SpikeyAnnie

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I've been following this thread with some amusement. I don't understand the outrage over Chris' request. He hasn't said anything about turning this into some kind of affirmative action opportunity. He just feels that a woman would be more appropriate for this project. He may be right or wrong about that, but isn't it his call, especially since we don't know much about the nature of the project? Hell, if I were a woman I would never have a male gynecologist. People are hired based on their backgrounds all the time. Nobody would be outraged over a director who said "I was raised in Brooklyn. I'm perfect for this project!" Like I said, he may very well be wrong about his theory, but it's his movie and if he loses out on a more talented cinematographer I'd say it's his loss. Besides, judging by the number of female members of the ASC, I don't think males have to worry about losing jobs to women all that often.

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I've been following this thread with some amusement. I don't understand the outrage over Chris' request. He hasn't said anything about turning this into some kind of affirmative action opportunity. He just feels that a woman would be more appropriate for this project. He may be right or wrong about that, but isn't it his call, especially since we don't know much about the nature of the project?

Does anyone recall that way back in 1981, when Steven Spielberg was making E.T., he hired Carol Littleton to cut it rather than use his regular collaborator Michael Kahn? At the time, he said he did so because he wanted the film to have "a woman's touch." Given the chance to, would Mike Kahn, who's cut everything he's done since, have not been able to deliver? Couldn't he "channel" the right feel? It's an interesting question.

 

So yes, there's precedent. And it's not just a male/female issue. The point is, it's up to the director to pick his/her crew. There will always be a bias there, because the director is often looking beyond the skill level to what the individuals themselves can bring to the mix. Occasionally that hiring practice can be full of poop, but more often than not it's a natural, justifiable part of the collaborative process, IMO.

 

Saul.

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Guest Frank Gossimier

Hey ed2serious, re:

 

"One day, hopefully in my lifetime, the world will stop producing men with your mentality. Though I doubt it. "

 

Not very likely so long as our society continues to write laws that put the genders and races on un-equal, rather than equal footing.

 

You can dissmiss my argument with a simple one liner, but that doesn't change all the lopsided laws that screw men over.

 

But as I stated earlier the real test is the end credits of film and TV shows, and based on that men really have nothing to worry about, especially with the DP position.

 

BTW, did any one notice the title of this thread, Finding a "Girly" DP. "Girly?" Oh that's nice I'm sure no women find it offensive that they are refered to as "girly."

 

Frank

Edited by Frank Gossimier

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Guest Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

I hate to say this and I'm certainly not prejudiced in anyway but you may find that women DP's are sometimes more manly than male ones. (I know people who have had experience with them)

 

Put it this way, the women DP I am thinking of wanted to repaint the walls on a set, which just happened to be someone?s house (Yet she still wanted to do it)

She was completely full of herself and rude. Typical upper class powdered nosed type of women, prejudiced against anyone that wore caps or sport clothing. (You get the picture)

 

Although I may be stereotyping badly here, you might find someone good though.

Edited by Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Hi,

 

> It has taken me longer than a decade to truly feel confident about who I am because

> for so many of those years, I was constantly doing (and continue to do) things that

> girls "wouldn't want to do"

 

Several thoughts, not least of which "well done you". However, I would second your point that this stuff does apply to guys, often in a more subtle way. It's currently much more socially acceptable for women to act in a traditionall masculine manner than the opposite. I've actually seen it printed in varous girly magazines that any man who isn't interested in driving can't be worth bothering with - well, I've never bothered learning to drive, I just couldn't give a damn about it, which might make LA a difficult city but I don't think it should reflect on me as a person!

 

Anyway what're you talking about, all ACs wear combats...

 

Phil

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