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Chenz Relo

Slow Motion Panasonic HMC150

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Hi all,

 

I'm new to recording videos, and I just rented the Panasonic HMC150 for this weekend. I saw the similar post below and just wanted to get confirmation on how to do this.

 

I was just wondering if slow motion is something that I should incorporate afterwards when editing my project in Final Cut Pro or something that has to be done during the filming process.

 

Thank you.

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To shoot slow-mo with any camera, you need to shoot at a frame rate that's faster than the timeline frame rate, for example, if you shoot at 60fps and place it on a 24fps timeline, motion will be slowed by 2.5x

Speed ramping, where action gets faster and slower at various points in time, is simply done by shooting at a fast frame rate, and then by speeding the footage back up in the editor, making it "normal" speed. There are also some cameras that can perform speed ramping as you shoot.

 

Do remember the as you slow footage down in the editor, you are stretching frames over a longer period of time, so if you use slow-mo on footage that isn't a sufficiently high frame rate, you're going to get jitter and stop-motion like movement because there won't be enough frames to fill in. So to put it simply, the slowing factor is your shooting frame rate divided by your playback frame rate.

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I was just wondering if slow motion is something that I should incorporate afterwards when editing my project in Final Cut Pro or something that has to be done during the filming process.

 

I don't know what editing platform you are using, but I shoot regularly on a Panasonic HMC150, and you will have to account for slow-motion prior to shooting and in post-production. What I mean by that is anything you want in slow-motion will have to be shot in the 720p@60fps setting and then depending on whichever editing software you are using, you will have to crank that footage down in order to make it slow-motion.

 

For example, I use Final Cut Pro, so when I shoot something in 60fps, I have to make sure to change my capture settings to account for 60fps before I log and capture. Then once its captured I use cinema tools to conform it to my timeline frame rate which whill usually be lower (23.96fps/29.97fps etc)

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