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Greg Stoltz

Super 8 or K3 16mm

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I have read a lot of this forum and continue to learn daily the new and fantastic wonders of film making. I am in love with the idea of film and making movie on film.

 

As I venture to but my first camera, I am stuck between whether to purchase a super 8 camera or a K3 16mm?

 

I like that super 8 will be more cost effective and I want to slowly learn each format.

 

All advice is appreciated.

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Starting with 8mm would probably be best, because it is considerably cheaper and the basics of shooting on film will be the same for both formats (exposure problems, large versus small grain stocks, color temperature, remembering to take the lens cap off). In my encounters with 16mm, it is usually used in a group setting where multiple people are able to pitch in for the stock and then help make the movie together. But it is cool that you want to use film, because there really isn’t anything that can replace the aesthetic of silver on cellulose.

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I disagree completely.

And I'm someone who has shot an entire feature on Super 8.

If it's worth shooting, it's worth shooting on the best format possible.

 

The limited places that telecine Super 8 means that there's less competition - so it's not cheaper than 16mm to transfer to video.

That, and it's so much harder to get a decent image on S8, it takes more time, and/or you end up burning more stock getting it right.

 

I wish I'd have shot my feature in 16, even though it would have cost more in film stock - it was a really expensive for the telecine, and a lot of the film is really not too great looking.

 

Matt Pacini

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It depends on what you are doing. Super8 has been a learning experience for me and I love it. I think he should go 8mm and buy a decent camera (one that does in camera effects, such as lap dissolves, fades, etc.) and try his hand at a straight.net entry. Learn how and what makes a film work.

 

I'm going to continue to shoot super8, though I sold my Nikon R10 to help raise money for a Red Scarlet. ;)

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You probably stand to learn more from 16mm in that super8 started life as an ammeter format with the vast majority of the cameras produced being fully automatic in operation.

 

I've lent cameras to friends in the past and with only 5 minutes instruction they're able to go off and produce perfectly legible images!

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That, and it's so much harder to get a decent image on S8, it takes more time, and/or you end up burning more stock getting it right.

What kind of stock were you using? And I think someone shooting cool stuff in their back yard is going to spend a lot less time and money on re-shoots than someone endeavoring to film a whole feature.

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start with super 8. It is a cheap and easy intro to film making. Not all cameras are full auto, many, most in fact are both. The film stocks and scanning quality is the best it has ever been. Shoot super 8, you'll love it.

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