Jump to content
Richard Ashrowan

ND filters for bright light, ice and snow (and the Bolex filter holder)

Recommended Posts

I am planning on shooting in snow and ice using a Bolex, using b/w 7222 (200) stock. My last attempts at shooting in snow were not great - my lens goes to f22 and even with the variable shutter closed down (for an extra stop), some of my material was over-exposed. I was metering with a Bolex lightmeter (which has built in compensation for the reflex system). Stupidly, I didn't have any filters and sometimes found I simply couldn't stop down enough.

 

So, time for some ND filters.... I must admit I am relatively new to film cinematography and know next to nothing about filters. I should like to use the Bolex behind the lens filter holder rather than on the lens filters. Can anyone recommend what ND filters I might need to get and where I might source them? Any ideas where I might buy some different ND gelatin filters in the UK (I assume I can cut them out for the filter holder)?

 

Can anyone explain how much the different ND ratings should actually affect the exposure settings used?

 

Any other tips for shooting and metering in such conditions (reflected bright light on ice, snow, extreme cold) would be most appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a similar problem shooting here in Arizona. The sunlight is so intense it's impossible get proper exposure without a ND filter. I purchased all of mine through ebay. The Kodak Wratten series of filters is by far the most common and you can find lots of NOS filter gels with no problem. ND filters are rated as 1 stop for each increment of .3. So, a 1.00 rated filter is a difference of 1 1/3 of a stop. A .3 rated filter is 1 stop. I usually have to use a .9 filter (3 stops) in the desert to get where I need my exposure to be. You might also try a polarizing filter on the front of your lens to handle reflections/glare. But remember, this will add another 1 to 3 stops to your exposure so be sure to check the f-stop rating of the polarizer. Good luck!

Edited by Chris Elardo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a similar problem shooting here in Arizona. The sunlight is so intense it's impossible get proper exposure without a ND filter. I purchased all of mine through ebay. The Kodak Wratten series of filters is by far the most common and you can find lots of NOS filter gels with no problem. ND filters are rated as 1 stop for each increment of .3. So, a 1.00 rated filter is a difference of 3 1/3 of a stop. A .3 rated filter is 1 stop. I usually have to use a .9 filter (3 stops) in the desert to get where I need my exposure to be. You might also try a polarizing filter on the front of your lens to handle reflections/glare. But remember, this will add another 1 to 3 stops to your exposure so be sure to check the f-stop rating of the polarizer. Good luck!

 

Whoops! I had to edit- 1.00 = 3 1/3 stops

Edited by Chris Elardo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Rig Wheels Passport



    New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment



    Paralinx LLC



    Just Cinema Gear



    Serious Gear



    FJS International



    Broadcast Solutions Inc



    Glidecam



    CineLab



    G-Force Grips



    Gamma Ray Digital Inc



    Abel Cine



    The Original Slider



    Metropolis Post



    Tai Audio



    Ritter Battery



    Wooden Camera



    Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS



    Visual Products


    Cinematography Books and Gear
×
×
  • Create New...