Jump to content
Jurgen Lossau

Kodak stops production of Ektachrome 100D

Recommended Posts


Wouldn't it be good public relations to let the public know before the final run of 100 Ektachrome D is made, then let people who really like the stock buy a whole bunch of it and base the final run on pre-sales as well?

 

And if Kodak is worried a huge buy on a final run of Ektachrome 100D film product will affect sales of the remaining film stocks, just give the buyer a cartridge or two of the negative stock that will replace the discontinued Ektachrome stock as a lure.

 

I love Ektachrome 100 D, however, 50 negative may prove to be an even better alternative, as long as one can afford the negative transfer costs, so Kodak could win both ways, let people buy a ton of ektachrome, but lure them with a free sample negative replacement stock as well.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The final run is long ago - they sell the last batch from the refrigerator - Kodak says the film in stock will last for about 3 months. So you can see: This is a production which was long ago - and now they sell the last rolls...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A shame I am tapped out after Christmas and an upcoming trip overseas. I'd but 200 cartridges if I could. Negative stock is stupid crazy expensive the transfer compared to reversal. This is a real blow to my ability to film color in 8mm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love conventionally projecting my own films on a screen. It now looks like I'll mostly be shooting B&W Tri-X for that very reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not good, surf and super 8 are my passion, what to do but stock up what I can afford and use selectively, was about to buy a new camera. Was

Edited by Ian Payne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh... and I am extremely excited about Vision3 50D. I had the chance to shoot a few rolls from Pro8mm and the results are amazing. I've never seen a finer grained, highlight detailed, Super 8 film. Fantastic stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry... posting again... Unfortunately, this part of the official Kodak release:

 

 

With this addition to the

Kodak Super 8 film portfolio, filmmakers can choose from three color negatives ranging in speeds from 50 to 500 on the exposure index, or the KODAK TRI-X Black & White Reversal Film 7266.

 

 

 

Seems to confirm that 100D Color Reversal is no longer available. :(

Edited by David Cunningham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

no color reversal film being readily available is a disaster and will only make super8 increasingly inaccessible to those newcomers wanting to just pick up a camera and shoot as simply as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well there goes my hope to one day shoot something on 5285. Not S8mm, 'course, but sucks just the same. I really loved Kodak's Reversal stocks... looks like they and their wonderful quirks, and gone for good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The final run is long ago - they sell the last batch from the refrigerator - Kodak says the film in stock will last for about 3 months. So you can see: This is a production which was long ago - and now they sell the last rolls...

 

Kodak made one last final run of double super 8 100d last year, people should of read between the lines back then and began stock pilling to avoid any rush this announcement may cause!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

no color reversal film being readily available is a disaster and will only make super8 increasingly inaccessible to those newcomers wanting to just pick up a camera and shoot as simply as possible.

 

Technically, we still have Velvia 50 through Spectra. Not sure what their supply and future looks like. But, it's there.

 

http://www.spectrafilmandvideo.com/Film.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a big problem for students, too. When I was in college we shot reversal since it was so much cheaper than negative. Now, the universities that are still teaching film programs - even though they are few and far between - will force students who want to shoot on film to shoot negative. The costs alone will push even more budding filmmakers towards the faster, cheaper alternative.

 

Another tactically poor move by Kodak. If you want people to keep shooting film, you have to get them when they are just starting out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got the confirmation from Spectra Film and Video regarding their Velvia 50D and E6 processing:

 

 

"yes, we will continue to stock this item and the processing for the foreseeable future."

 

 

Just ordered two rolls to test it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well there goes my hope to one day shoot something on 5285. Not S8mm, 'course, but sucks just the same. I really loved Kodak's Reversal stocks... looks like they and their wonderful quirks, and gone for good.

 

Cracks me up, DP's wouldn't hesitate to pick up a digital 8 camcorder or mini-dv and be cutting edge, but no way would anyone attempt anything of note on Super-8.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My question is there anyone who develops and telecines negative that doesn't cost an arm and a leg. Or is film just for the industry now and not just for consumers like me?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andec still do Super 8 prints: http://www.andecfilm.de/en/e_s8_neg_pos.htm

 

Whilst Wittner Cinetec will be offering 100D: http://www.wittner-kinotechnik.de/neu/news2012.php#20121213-1

 

Thus there is some light at the end of the tunnel.

 

 

Yet Super 8 really needs a lot more people to jump on board, as the format may well have to be saved like the Impossible Project saved Polaroid (but not my favourite 500 films). So let's hope that even more Hipsters are drawn to the format!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great news about Wittner. Having Velvia 50D (while supplies last) and Wittner 100D will make life easier and definitely make it unnecessary to horde Kodak 100D.

 

Super 8 has found a nice niche in wedding cinematography (my field). But, I hardly ever use reversal for it anymore. No brides care about actually being able to project it and the lack of latitude made it a nightmare in modern wedding settings. Between running indoors and outdoors and all the bright dance floor lighting in dark rooms, reversal was almost useless. I'm all negative (almost all 500T except for outdoor exclusive weddings) these days. The extra grain of 500T is actually appealing as it increases the "nostalgic" look.

 

Two rolls of Spectra Velvia 50D on the way to me for testing/personal use though.

Edited by David Cunningham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Steve Salem

I'd sooner treat digital footage to look the way I want before using color negative super 8. Negative film always looks like fake super 8 to me anyway.

Also, I just can't cope with the unknown factor of the transfer - not to mention the expense. In my early days I recognized that the transfers I was getting back were a hack. So I tooled up to do my own transfers and really enjoy being able to tweak for the best possible result.

 

Negative film might be fine for larger formats where you're attempting to maximize image quality and minimize artifacts. But it's the artifacts of small format reversal film that makes super 8 so charming.

It's not JUST the fact that it's "real film".

The wedding folks who hopped on the super 8 band wagon will continue to peddle super 8 using negative stocks.

Brides will still buy the pitch because the industry has adopted the concept so broadly and it's now a big money maker for the industry.

The clients don't know any better and now many never will.

The reality is that negative film simply does not have the beauty factor and charm of super 8 reversal, ESPECIALLY since plus-x was discontinued.

It's not just about getting a recognizable image in low light.

 

Unfortunately, people seeking the true super 8 experience are just going to be left feeling disappointed. And possibly ripped off.

Edited by Steve Salem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • CineLab



    Serious Gear



    New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment



    Visual Products



    G-Force Grips



    Broadcast Solutions Inc



    Gamma Ray Digital Inc



    Glidecam



    Paralinx LLC



    Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS



    Abel Cine



    Tai Audio



    Wooden Camera



    FJS International



    Metropolis Post



    Ritter Battery



    Rig Wheels Passport



    Just Cinema Gear


    Cinematography Books and Gear
×
×
  • Create New...