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Video Assist for ARRI 435 in near darkness shooting Black and White IR film


Adiva J  Koenigsberg
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I am the DP, in pre-production for a 35mm motion picture film being shot on black and white infra red film in Israel. I am trying to find a solution for a video assist to accompany our ARRI 435. We are shooting in almost complete darkness, only with infra red light sources. I am looking for contacts or leads to individuals who may knows how to build a video assist that corresponds with the parameters of the IR stock that we are working with. If anyone has any suggestions or knows of any camera tech wizards I would be thrilled to speak with them. Please contact me directly at adiva@thenthis.org.

 

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I am the DP, in pre-production for a 35mm motion picture film being shot on black and white infra red film in Israel. I am trying to find a solution for a video assist to accompany our ARRI 435. We are shooting in almost complete darkness, only with infra red light sources. I am looking for contacts or leads to individuals who may knows how to build a video assist that corresponds with the parameters of the IR stock that we are working with. If anyone has any suggestions or knows of any camera tech wizards I would be thrilled to speak with them. Please contact me directly at adiva@thenthis.org.

 

Basically any black and white CCD video tap camera with its IR filter removed will image Infrared with no trouble.

In fact CCD sensors are more sensitive to IR than visible light, which is why the filter is needed.

Most rental houses will probably still be able to find an old B&W video assist camera for a 435.

The IR filter is usually fitted directly on top of the CCD sensor and is usually a greenish-looking square of glass.

In most cameras it is held in place with a small metal clamp that you can remove by undoing a couple of screws.

In a lot of cases the IR filter has already been removed as it gives a half-stop extra sensitivity

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Adiva,

It is interesting to know that you are shooting a motion picture in IR. I recently got into IR for filming leopards in complete darkness. I am using all digital setup.

 

Since we can't see IR ourselves, it is better that you use any digital camera with IR filter removed as Keith has suggested. You can see the amount of lighting you need as well as examine the correct positioning by viewing through the digital. Canon had some time back launched a 20Da camera for Infrared. You can also modify any of the current DSLRs with 35mm sensor to match the 435.

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