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Top shot from the ceiling

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Hello,

Since I would like to put the Red Scarlet with lens (about 4.5-5kg) from the top(about 2 metre high at least) doing a top shot on the character lay on the ground, even I put my tripod high up, but the angle is not desirable, just wonder if there's any way of gripping/ mounting to do a top shot from the ceiling ?

 

Thanks

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Thanks for info, what kind of grip I can attach on the the speed rail or lumber, so I can attach a camera on it ?And if there's any photo sample would be great help.

 

Thanks

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I'd get a grip to describe the specific equipment you need. You could screw or clamp a hi-hat to the plank but whether it can be upside down or sideways depends on if your head can point straight up (thus straight down when inverted.)

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I just did a shot like this above a bathtub!

 

My key grip used two cardellini's & a double knuckle. One cardellini on the speed rail into the knuckle. The other side of the knuckle has the other cardellini holding the dovetail plate on the camera. Then a safety chain around it. Simple, yet effective.

 

Also, please make sure it's completely safe before placing actors. And if there's a matte box, make sure it's secured!

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Thanks a lot for the info, I will check about it, but if there's any photo reference or link would be nice, since I still new in grip :wacko:

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We used part of a bonnet (hood in US) car mount, U bolted onto a scaffolding tube, in a goal post arrangement using a couple of crank up light stands for a few shots over a bed.

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Hello,

Since I would like to put the Red Scarlet with lens (about 4.5-5kg) from the top(about 2 metre high at least) doing a top shot on the character lay on the ground, even I put my tripod high up, but the angle is not desirable, just wonder if there's any way of gripping/ mounting to do a top shot from the ceiling ?

 

Thanks

Without the field of view or focal length and format it's difficult to answer this. Those things would tell us if you are bumping into the frame edge with the means of support. If it's just a one off then you can rig something unusual. It's down to you, or your grip's improv' skills. But if you want these shots as part of the routine vocabulary for a project then consider having a jib arm. A lot of overhead shots then become easy, and you can refine compositions and moves that would otherwise be ridgid or not quite perfect shots with a fixed or rail support.

Edited by Gregg MacPherson

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If you use a Hi-Hat for this purpose I would suggest not mounting it perpendicular to the floor.

I mount a Hi-Hat at around 45 degrees and tilt the fluid head to get the camera vertical. This is meant to reduce the stress on the mounting plate, thereby lessening the chance that the whole mess will come crashing down. I also safety cable the dickens out of it. The first project I had to do this with had the camera mounted to a studio grid, but I later came up with a way to do the same thing using an Avenger A4050CS boom stand for when a grid (or our jib) isn't available.

olduncledino

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Did a similar top down shot of two characters in bed recently with an F65. We used a Dana Dolly with 6' speedrail and combo stands on either side of the bed. We tied off the camera and stands with sash cord and counter weighted the camera with a sandbag and a cardellini off the back of the camera platform. That was a 75 degree tilt down, not 90. Having a ultra wide lens helps, since you don't have to go up as high. I used a 12mm Ultra Prime in this case, but I've also done it with a Tokina 11-16, works great.

 

For something more secure with a heavy camera, you should use a 90 degree tilt plate and attach an Arri dovetail or quick release plate system directly to the tilt plate itself. You lose a bit of quick adjustability but it is definitely safer. I've gone up almost to top floor on high rollers with an Alexa that way, it works. Here's what the tilt plate looks like: post-5721-0-89765000-1411494331_thumb.jpg

 

With a Scarlet, it's light enough when fully stripped it down that you can use two baby pins to mount it to gobo heads. Just run a cable for AC power and a BNC for picture. If you have a Redmote or extra long EVF cable for the Touch screen so that you can control the camera from the ground, even better. Put a 3/8-16 pin in the base and another 3/8-16 of 1/4-20 in the cheese plate on top or on the handle. You need at least two mounting points for stability and safely. Just remember that the safety of cast and crew is always your #1 priority.

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