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I recently inherited a trio of nikkor lenses that I plan on de-clicking. I've browsed numerous forums, blogs and videos with no success. Anyone know a good source on how to de-click these lenses?

 

Nikkor-H Auto 50mm f/2

 

Nikkor-P Auto 105mm f/2.5

 

Nikkor-Q Auto 200mm f/4

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No idea, but if you're vaguely handy it shouldn't be that hard to work out yourself. Start with the 50mm, which is cheaply replaced, and remove the mount screws...

 

If you can't work out the rest, you probably won't do any better with instructions and may as well send them to a shop to get done. If you do work it out, you'll feel a rush of satisfaction and a powerful enthusiasm to tackle the other lenses!

 

Not meant as a put-down by the way, just encouragement to give it a go. It can be fun to tackle these kinds of jobs.

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I'd start with that little screw on the knurled aperture ring. If you slacken it off it might relieve the little bit of spring steel which does the clicking.

Beware, it might just attach the ring to the mechanism.

Edit- that's a guess.

Edited by Mark Dunn

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you have to remove this spring which is located under the aperture ring:

16295630265_f6bc1138ac_c.jpg

 

Before disassembling the lens, please watch the aperture ring carefully: depending on the lens model, it may have two small screws which are close together. in these lens types there's a internal lever which connects the iris system to the aperture ring and is attached with these screws: you have to remove them before trying to lift the aperture ring off. Reassembling the ring may be a nightmare because the lever moves quite freely and can be difficult to hold on place when attaching the screws back: I recommend using small paper stripes under the lever so you can somewhat hold the lever at correct position so you can get the screws back properly.

After removing the click spring, you may have to add more friction to the aperture ring. One way is to use small tape stripes under the ring and add couple of them over each other to get desired friction.

15673217094_cf01193f78_c.jpg

  • Upvote 1

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those images are of 35mm F2.8 AI-S but I believe the older lenses work the same way. with that 35mm it took about 10 minutes to do the de-clicking, I just removed the mount, then the aperture ring, took the spring off, added some friction, put the aperture ring back and reattached the mount. the friction adjustment took most of the time..

Edited by aapo lettinen
  • Upvote 1

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Thanks for the help, these methods definitely helped with the 50mm and the 105mm. However the 200 does something wierd by not having any screws other than those on the lens mount and just under, but getting access to the ones under the mount is difficult.

 

Any ideas?

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