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I have a Panasonic AC-130 camera.

 

We're shooting an interior night scene (with lighting) but the dark areas and blacks are really noisy.

 

Why is that? How can I get the blacks to be black?

 

Thanks!

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What gain setting did you have on the camera?

 

The dark grey areas of an image will show the 'noise' more, so, one solution is to minimize 'dark areas'. There is also the 'crush the blacks' approach which is to use 'curves' in the NLE to push all 'dark areas' to 'black', thus minimizing or eliminating the crackly blacks. This however also eliminates detail in the blacks, which is often an objectionable element in itself.

 

Shooting with 'more light' is the more effective way to minimize noise, then adjusting the curves to give the dark areas detail, but not significant noise.

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If you shoot at an ISO setting that is low in noise and your blacks are color-corrected to be black, then you shouldn't have noise problems.

 

Most noise problems come from the combination of shooting at too high an ISO setting, or underexposing (same thing), and is then compounded by attempting to pull detail out of the shadows rather than keeping the blacks black and using more fill light if necessary to see detail in the shadows.

 

If your camera is on auto-gain, then once the f-stop hits max wide-open, then the camera starts cranking the gain to compensate if the light levels are low. Set gain manually to "0", set the f-stop and shutter manually, then add enough light to get the correct exposure.

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If you shoot at an ISO setting that is low in noise and your blacks are color-corrected to be black, then you shouldn't have noise problems.

 

Most noise problems come from the combination of shooting at too high an ISO setting, or underexposing (same thing), and is then compounded by attempting to pull detail out of the shadows rather than keeping the blacks black and using more fill light if necessary to see detail in the shadows.

 

If your camera is on auto-gain, then once the f-stop hits max wide-open, then the camera starts cranking the gain to compensate if the light levels are low. Set gain manually to "0", set the f-stop and shutter manually, then add enough light to get the correct exposure.

 

Hey david, the information is very interesting. You make me understand. You helped me so much. Thanks for sharing this!

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