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Hi

 

I have been working only with dark room photography but film processing is quite new. Recently I have been interested in 16mm b/w hand processingd but still I am stuck on primitive level.

 

I am using kodak 7222 negative films now. And I am wondering how I can produce positive film from negative edition. I guess there should be professional duplication machine in the lab. But is it also possible to duplicate(negative to positive or vice versa) by hand processing?

 

I am working alone as it is my hobby so I have no contacts from professional people. It would be appreciated someone let me know detail processes. Thanks!

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Hi

I think what you want to do is make a positive, rather than an inter positive. A positive is for projection and has normal projection contrast. An inter positive is low contrast and designed for them making an internegative from.

For a positive you want to use a bw print stock like Kodak 3302 or Orwo pf2. These come in very long rolls of 2000 feet.

There are a number of ways to make a diy contact print involving bi-packing various film mechanisms. You can do it to a flat bed editor (like a steenbeck) or a projector or a camera like a bolex. The bolex version is the easiest and doesn't require modifying anything. With a normal bolex you would wind max 50 feet of meg with the same amount of print stock with the emulsion to emulsion. Note, start with the neg head out. It will end up tail out after preparing it with print stock. Load bipacked roll into camera. Take off lens. Point camera at a bright light bouncing off a white wall. Develop film. If it's too light or too dark change the camera speed and repeat.

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Hi

I think what you want to do is make a positive, rather than an inter positive. A positive is for projection and has normal projection contrast. An inter positive is low contrast and designed for them making an internegative from.

For a positive you want to use a bw print stock like Kodak 3302 or Orwo pf2. These come in very long rolls of 2000 feet.

There are a number of ways to make a diy contact print involving bi-packing various film mechanisms. You can do it to a flat bed editor (like a steenbeck) or a projector or a camera like a bolex. The bolex version is the easiest and doesn't require modifying anything. With a normal bolex you would wind max 50 feet of meg with the same amount of print stock with the emulsion to emulsion. Note, start with the neg head out. It will end up tail out after preparing it with print stock. Load bipacked roll into camera. Take off lens. Point camera at a bright light bouncing off a white wall. Develop film. If it's too light or too dark change the camera speed and repeat.

Hi Richard,

Thank you very much! I have bolex so i can try it. I haven't thought about it at all, brilliant! Just in case, as I understood I have to put the my negative with print stock together. Doesn't it make bolex jamming? Or is there any special method to reel the film on the roll? Thanks again!

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Hi Richard,

Thank you very much! I have bolex so i can try it. I haven't thought about it at all, brilliant! Just in case, as I understood I have to put the my negative with print stock together. Doesn't it make bolex jamming? Or is there any special method to reel the film on the roll? Thanks again!

For the film to be printed, be careful to allow an extra frame on each loop. As in this picture of Bolex:

http://filmcamblog.blogspot.co.uk/2010/11/printing-special-effects-in-camera.html

 

If camera and film are in good order there shouldn't be trouble with jamming.

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  • 4 years later...
On 11/9/2016 at 10:45 AM, Doug Palmer said:

For the film to be printed, be careful to allow an extra frame on each loop. As in this picture of Bolex:

http://filmcamblog.blogspot.co.uk/2010/11/printing-special-effects-in-camera.html

After I tried many times, back to old post I should ask...

Doug, I've tried to do what you described and I still couldn't understand why you emphasised extra frame. Doesn't it actually make more potential probelms? I did bipack while those round guide is locked, so two film moves altogether always.

Also I have a trouble that sometimes negative seems slip while exposing it so end up making vertically shaken images on print stock. It doesn't happen always so I am not sure if it relates with this extra frame matter.

I don't know if anybody would check but I post in case..

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