Jump to content
Hank Vadim

Explain camera report forms please!

Recommended Posts

Hello guys, tell me about those camera report forms. What do you put in that form, when, and why? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You fill the reports on the shoot day. A camera assistant usually fills them out. They provide information to the editors and other post production staff on the slate numbers and technical information. If shooting on film it will provide footage for each take and processing info for the laboratory.

 

Here's one person's camera report sheet, there are others for film shoots.

 

http://www.theblackandblue.com/2011/12/27/camera-reports/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every take is recorded on a camera report. Most of them feature:

  • Camera height
  • Lens
  • Aperture
  • Angle
  • Scene #
  • Shot (expressed with letters)
  • Special notes (such as rehearsal shot, VFX plate, bad take, false roll, etc)
  • Clip name (if digital)
  • Compression/codec (if digital)
  • Filters

Big picture: the camera report isn't the only thing post-production uses. The Script Supervisor report is heavily used. A 2nd AC should be constantly in touch with the Script Supervisor to ensure accuracy on the camera report.

 

Filling out a report as a 2nd AC is challenging, but part of the job. Stay focused, ask questions, and don't assume.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It gets easy; shots start to repeat, things stop changing. Usually codec is the same throughout and metadata is eliminating more and more things a report needs to have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They also sell little books as camera logs.

I know, went to buy one from Arri the other day. It has like 30 pages and costs 20GBP!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know, went to buy one from Arri the other day. It has like 30 pages and costs 20GBP!!

 

 

Cos they had Arri written on them.. they used to be supplied by the actual labs themselves .. for free ! .. might be worth checking that out.. was a long time ago though !..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Cos they had Arri written on them.. they used to be supplied by the actual labs themselves .. for free ! .. might be worth checking that out.. was a long time ago though !..

 

FotoKem still sends out carbon copy reports, just like they always have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's very easy if you're a second assistant and your job begins and ends with fetching equipment and writing these things out.

 

Well, I mean, I assume it does. Next time I actually get a second assistant, I'll ask.

 

If it's just you and perhaps a focus puller and that's the entire camera, grip and electrical department, writing all this stuff out is one of the first things to get put aside.

 

P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would assume if you're talking about extremely small production crews, you'll also have an extremely post production crew, so communication is less of an issue. Also, the chances are there won't be the volume of media found on a larger production.

 

I know that the one camera assistant on 16mm productions used to fill out the camera reports.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the last show I did, we had a simple report form with the following info tracked for every shot/take

 

Scene

Take

Clip #

Lens

Filter

Special remarks

 

At the top, for every report, we would also note the ASA and color temp, and make not of any mid-roll changes to these settings in "remarks".

 

Since our show used several different lenses, it was important to note the lens series being used - we had ultraprimes, optimo zooms, and a lens baby kit. When we were on a zoom, I would do my best to track the focal length and lens being used for that particular take. If it was an inconsistent range, I would often write "VAR" which stood for "various".

 

It's best to try and be as accurate as possible, and we often would refer back to the notes when matching shots on second unit or for inserts. It can be hard at times, especially in the rain, but once you develop good habits it gets easier. Easier still if you've got a stellar script supervisor. One of the hardest parts for me was not being able to see the camera or monitors between every take, and I had a 1st that would often roll too early, and then cut, adding extra clips to the card that I had a hard time accounting for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What would you put in the clip section?

 

Usually what the camera is saying the current (or about to be recorded) clip name is.

 

IE: A002_CLIP004

 

This is crucial with matching handwritten notes to the digital data. Some cameras don't record the clips in the order that they're shot, so having the clip name recorded on the log will help with organizing footage later (and doing playback in camera).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What camera is recording clips not in the order they are shot.. ?? why/how.. not having a go .. honestly have never heard of this ..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What camera is recording clips not in the order they are shot.. ?? why/how.. not having a go .. honestly have never heard of this ..

 

I've had RED cameras configured for unique naming and the files are out of order. I've also recently tested the Varicam and the files were out of order when importing them into DaVinci.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

man, this is getting mucho complicado.

you can write in camera reports whatever you want, so long as the rest of the people in the production workflow understand what you are writing down. same goes for the slates - i personally don't care what's written on them. that information is not for me, it is presented to others.

 

i'm sure there are regional differences, but on productions i have worked on, where we had: 1. script supervisor on set, 2. a lab which processes/stores/creates dailies or otherwise works with the shot material, the camera reports simply reflect what was shot on the mag (this is for digital)

- date

- roll number

- take number (not camera's clip number)

- related notes

 

have a look at the attached pic of one of my reports

 

post-37833-0-20281500-1494293750_thumb.jpg

Edited by Kyryll Sobolev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

these reports are an anachronism anyway, same as slating. hopefully they'll morph into something more useful over the next decade, or disappear.

 

in music vids and commercials there are no camera reports anymore (for digital work).

nearly everything is noted by script supervisor, and vetted by DIT/DMT, before going out to the lab

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I've had RED cameras configured for unique naming and the files are out of order. I've also recently tested the Varicam and the files were out of order when importing them into DaVinci.

 

 

Had to be a RED .. :).. my camera you can set your own clip name/number .. or have the industry standard random file configuration.. but the actual clip number is always sequential .. as recorded 001 up wards.. wonder why they would ever what files out of order.. or is it a software bug in post..?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

these reports are an anachronism anyway, same as slating. hopefully they'll morph into something more useful over the next decade, or disappear.

 

in music vids and commercials there are no camera reports anymore (for digital work).

nearly everything is noted by script supervisor, and vetted by DIT/DMT, before going out to the lab

 

Many editors like having the slate because it gives the details on their screen. Short form productions can be rather different in their demands to long form, also it applies a discipline on the set, actors know that something is about to happen and crew members on a larger set can see a take is about to happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've long felt that slating, while it hasn't been strictly necessary for decades, has a certain disciplinary value.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Many editors like having the slate because it gives the details on their screen. Short form productions can be rather different in their demands to long form, also it applies a discipline on the set, actors know that something is about to happen and crew members on a larger set can see a take is about to happen.

 

the actual slate as a shot identifier will not disappear.

i meant to act of the physical clapper will. hopefully. soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So wait, where is the audio logged? If the audio is being recorded externally shouldn't that be listed on the camera report?

Audio is the sound mixer's job. No reason for it to appear on a camera report, other than to note if a shot is MOS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Broadcast Solutions Inc



    Ritter Battery



    Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS



    Just Cinema Gear



    G-Force Grips



    Tai Audio



    Serious Gear



    Paralinx LLC



    Wooden Camera



    New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment



    Metropolis Post



    Gamma Ray Digital Inc



    CineLab



    Glidecam



    Rig Wheels Passport



    Abel Cine



    The Original Slider



    Visual Products



    FJS International


    Cinematography Books and Gear
×
×
  • Create New...