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Hi guys,

 

I've been given the task to shoot a music video. The director wanted to be to create a lighting set up similar to the picture below.

 

It's very low budget, so I have 3 kino flows and one Arri 2k. I wanted to know what will be the best way to avoid spill when using the kino flow to light the subject?

 

Thank you for reading

 

Christopher

 

post-67357-0-71387900-1517873109_thumb.jpg

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Kino and spill go hand in hand I'm afraid, even with the eggcrates.

 

I'd say assign the Kinos to your backgrounds and use the Arri 2k for the primary subject. Assuming you don't have anything other than gels and the lights.

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Flags, flags, flags... and distance between the subject and walls!

 

If the Kinos are right above the top of the walls, parallel to them and pointed down, then some barndoor extenders would probably be enough to keep the spill down.

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For me it depends how wide you want to get in your widest shot AND how big the room is. If your room is fairly big, you could probably get away with simply pointing the Arri into the corner of the room at full spot right above the middle of your frame, gelling it red and dimming it way down. Then you would get one 4x4 daylight kino bank right above your protagonist, skirt the outside with duvetyne and set your camera white balance to 3200k. To finish, you would add 1/4 CTBs until you were satisfied with the tone of blue you would get. For this, it might be a full CTB. Because of the strong amount of seperation between the red and blue, it would be fairly easy to get EXACTLY the color you wanted for both of them in the grade, assuming you got the colors on set even close to the ones in the still.

 

If the room is fairly small, then you couldn't get too wide in your shots anyway, as otherwise there would be a ton of spill between the two light sources and you dont have the space to hide the forest of flags it might need to contain the spill from the background into the foreground.

 

How you would get the kinos right above the talent would depend on the location and how wide you want to go. Either you use a goalpost rig (if you arent getting too wide in your shot), a menace arm or you can somehow attached it directly to the ceiling (often possible in industrial settings).

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Oh and be aware that skirting the kinos with duvetyne and pointing them straight down traps the heat of the lamps in there and can make them shift their color and I have had ballasts turn off on me because the lamps overheated. As the heavy blue tint will probably erase all perceivable shifts in color I imagine that wouldnt be an issue, but maybe turn the kinos off every once in a while.

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If it's a very low budget project I find it easier, just in term of rigging, the 2K to light the subject, than the kinos (and it's also easier to control, than something softer like the kinos are)

Once you do the blocking you could adjust the 2K so it lights the subject and you shape it accordinly. I guess it’s easier if you have a room enough big so that your subject isn’t too close to the background, since then it’d be harder to separate the colors.

 

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Thank you to everyone who has responded to my query, I really appreciate the feedback given! I am definitely going to do lighting test and try to see which result works best (ill keep you updated). Once again thank you guys for responding.

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I'd use the 2K as the "blue" and gel it (you'll need that on a 18x24 or larger not on the doors and a bit of room cause it'll melt the gel, which looks like a nice rich blue) and then I'd use the Kinos as the Red in the room, maybe only with 1 or 2 tubes on to balance for the output loss from the blue gel on the 2K. Then skirt them (the kinos) off of the subject.

For the Kino Rigging you can also look into wall-spreaders.

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If the location allows to place the camera far enough (shoot from another room or hallway), and you don't need to have a wide master shot, you could try shooting on a 100-180mm telephoto, so that you have enough distance from actor to BG.

You can toplight the actor using a mirror, which takes less grippery (and is safer) to hang than a 2K. And with a mirror you're making your source smaller, which means easier to flag off.

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Wouldnt it be more efficient to use the 2k as the red source since its already closer to that part of the colour spectrum? Kinos could then be daylight balanced plus a bit more blue.

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