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Cecilia Danell

Projector lamp yellow tinge?

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Hi,

I recently renovated a super 8 projector that I got off a friend that had a faulty lamp connector and needed the belts replaced. I just got a couple of reels of B/W Tri-x film back from the lab that I ran through it yesterday.

 

Last year I was only shooting Vision 3 stock that I had digitally transferred, so this is my first time projecting new footage in about 7 years.

 

The image looks good and the projector works well, but I noticed the lamp has quite an orange tint. I don't think this would be very noticeable had I been projecting colour film, but with it being black and white the projected image looks pretty yellow. Like, I said, it's been a long time since I last projected Tri-x but I doubt it's the film itself as I don't remember it looking this yellow the last time. The last time I rented a more high-end projector off a guy who sells super 8 equipment. My projector is a modest Sankyo P-1600. However, I read somewhere that projector bulbs can sometimes give off an orange tinge when they reach the end of their life span. This was referring to digital projectors, but could it be the same with a Super 8 projector bulb? Would it make a difference if I changed the bulb or is it just the type of projector that will have this kind of tinge due to it being less strong than some of the high-end projectors?

 

Am I wasting my time by replacing the bulb or is it worth trying? What are your experiences with projecting b/w film och bulb colour temperature? I don't mind this for just looking through reels, but if I were to showcase footage to other people I'd prefer if it wasn't yellow tinged since the film itself isn't.

 

I'm attaching a quick snap I took with my phone.

 

Thanks!

post-71671-0-50072000-1520183870_thumb.jpg

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Thanks for your suggestion, I'm gonna have a look and see if the lens might need cleaning. Good to know that halogen lamps don't normally go yellow, then I can rule that out.

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Incidentally your image doesn't look at all yellow on my monitor. But the camera could have just auto white balanced it.

Stupid quiestion, but are you sure the screen itself is clean and white?

Edited by Mark Dunn

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To rule out any issues with the projector, carefully examine the film frames with a loop over a daylight balanced light source. A loupe with the film against some wax paper on a window if a light table isn't available. If the film shows a yellow tinge, then it's the laboratory processing at fault; an issue with the Bleach not being fully Cleared out of the film.....old Bleach, weak Clearing Bath etc, which will leave such a stain on the image. If the film is fine, then possibly the lens itself or while rare, the heat absorbing glass (if you have one). As the cement begins to break down within lens elements, there can often be a yellow color tinging. Good luck!

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Hi Martin, thanks for all those suggestions. I just checked the film against a window in daylight and it's definitely not the film, it's a cool grey and has no yellow tinge, so the developing seems to have been done well, thankfully. I will examine the projector and follow your suggestions of what to look for. I'm gonna be away for a few days so will get back to you as soon as I get a chance to do this.

 

Thanks again!

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Incidentally your image doesn't look at all yellow on my monitor. But the camera could have just auto white balanced it.

Stupid quiestion, but are you sure the screen itself is clean and white?

 

I'm using a mac and the photo looks yellow on my screen, but I know pc:s are sometimes colour calibrated differently.

To answer your question, I wasn't projecting onto a screen but onto a white wall in my art studio. The wall is a pure white, so no yellow discolouration there. I'll let you know when I've investigated this further. Thanks! :)

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Cecilia,

If you want to partially correct the yellow tinge when projection black & white films,

I can recommend using a (clean) Kodak gelatine CC Blue color correction filter on (or inside) the projection lens, perhaps a 010 or 020 (or even 030 or 040) strength, depending on how yellow your lamp is.
I am using a thin CC Blue filter (020) to improve whiteness when projecting 6x6cm color slides in a Rollei P.11 Universal slide projector. It certainly looks a little cleaner and whiter to me.

Best regards, Bengt F, photographer, Stockholm, Sweden

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