Jump to content
Will Montgomery

Scanning Only Certain Parts of a Negative

Recommended Posts

I'm in the process of putting together a film DP reel. I have scans/telecines of all the material but they are of wildly differing qualities...from SD to 4k.

 

If I know I only need 45 seconds of a particular reel, is it practical to tell the scanning house exactly what to scan from each reel...by approximate time or by frame grabs and only scan that vs. scanning an entire 400-800' reel?

 

I'm not trying to cheap out, but I also don't need everything on the reel.

 

My goal is to get quality and consistent 4k scans of everything and work locally with a colorist to make it shine.

 

Is that just a standard request or should I expect to pay a slight premium due to finding the part I need scanned then loading and unloading reels so much? (not opposed to such a fee.)

 

Thanks for any insight,

 

Will Montgomery

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a fairly common practice just to scan 'selects'. Giving the post house the relevant keycodes should be all they need. If you don't have the Keycodes, and they have to match frame by eye, then I would expect them to charge extra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Select scans are generally not all that inexpensive, there is time to do lineup and verify the edl etc etc. you may find that it is a wash between doing a selects EDL scan and just scanning the hole reel.

 

Maybe for a short single roll it would be ok but for larger projects expect to pay for all the labor it takes to do a selects scan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would agree with Rob. In the past when scan costs were calculated in cents-per-frame instead of cents-per-foot, it could be cost effective to just grab selects. But we find that the setup time involved in doing EDL based scans, plus all the shuttling of the scanner, often makes it more expensive than just scanning the whole thing straight through (unless you're talking about a really big reel of course). Grabbing half a dozen shots off of a 1000' reel can take more time than just scanning the reel, depending on the settings.

 

It's probably best to physically cut out the section of film in question, give it enough leader on each end and send that in for scanning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

It's probably best to physically cut out the section of film in question, give it enough leader on each end and send that in for scanning.

I was assuming that OP didn't have film handling equipment since he didn't mention cutting it himself.

Edited by Mark Dunn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Building scan reels from an edl is also a ton of work and requires meticulous attention to detail.

 

One of the guys who used to work at Cinelab ended up at deluxe in LA and that was his job, building scan reels from edl.

 

Also expensive and with scanners being fast these days in most cases scanning the whole reel is the way to go.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was assuming that OP didn't have film handling equipment since he didn't mention cutting it himself.

 

I'm fairly certain Will has the hardware. But for something as simple as extracting a reel, all one needs is a set of rewinds and a splicer, and a clean space to work in - none of that is particularly exotic equipment. I'd definitely have the film cleaned before scanning though, since this process will almost certainly introduce dust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's what I expected. It would seem more time consuming for the scan house to try and figure out what was needed vs. just running the whole reel down. I think I may need to do it locally and sit with the scanning guy to make it move more quickly for them.

 

The only reason I would pursue this method is that I only need like 20 seconds of some of these 400' reels. Hoping the reel will show off "what's possible" when shooting film that I can use to sell clients so scan quality and color is going to be important.

 

Film seems to be an easy sell for me with music videos but I'd like to broaden it's use with my clients where possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you would know the approximate position of the needed shots on the reel you could ask them to just scan those with couple of feets extra. for example "scan only from the 122ft to 210ft on reel 8" and if you would need something extra which is located close to that range on the reel you could just let them scan the whole range so that they would not need to find the other spot separately.

If the scanner needs lots of shot by shot adjustments it would be much better to sit with the operator and pick up the exact shots needed. or transfer the adjacent shots too but only make the fine adjustments to the select shots you know you will need

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • CineLab



    Just Cinema Gear



    G-Force Grips



    Abel Cine



    Wooden Camera



    Visual Products



    FJS International



    Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS



    Serious Gear



    Broadcast Solutions Inc



    Tai Audio



    Gamma Ray Digital Inc



    Metropolis Post



    The Original Slider



    Ritter Battery



    Paralinx LLC



    Glidecam



    New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment



    Rig Wheels Passport


    Cinematography Books and Gear
×
×
  • Create New...