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Am I "Wrong" For Liking Fast Shutter?

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So the standard shutter angle I hear is 180°/172.8° .. I won't argue with what the "standard" is, but I personally like the look of around 80°-100°.

 

My philosophy for this quicker angle is it seems to come off far more crisp. Also only much faster movement displays blur which I feel can create a good separation of motion in the visual image. Screengrabs are also way sharper.

 

Should I stop these faster angles immediately? Is 1/50 vs 1/100 that much of a difference?

Edited by Macks Fiiod

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Thanks God we have Cinematographers like you! That makes the whole thing intresting. Would be boring if everyone does the same. It's your style. It makes you unique.

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I guess sometimes it might not "fit" the mood or look for a particular scene/film.. you might need the light.. or it might give you flicker..

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I can't stand motion blur and if you ever looked at normal 180 degree footage frame by frame, you'll see that most if not all of the movement is blurry. I generally shoot at 72 degrees and nobody ever notices the difference. One bonus with this approach is having more usable frames to use as stills.


 

 

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I like it too. I think it's liked because it increases the visibility of the imperfect motion rendering which tells us we're watching a movie. Witness the vehemence with which high frame rate narrative drama has been received; nobody liked it.

 

People will make counterarguments about how this is all just the fact that we're conditioned to like certain things, but anyone's free to try to encourage people to like something else.

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I shoot sports nearly every day after work and I never shoot 1/48. Way too much motion blur for action. I typically shoot around 1/60 - 1/80 at 24fps. For 60fps shots I'm usually at 1/180.

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I shoot sports nearly every day after work and I never shoot 1/48. Way too much motion blur for action. I typically shoot around 1/60 - 1/80 at 24fps. For 60fps shots I'm usually at 1/180.

Well for sports it's a given, right? I was just shooting people walking around for a documentary's B-roll.

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With digital, I've gone as little as 45 degree's. It actually seemed to help with rolling shutter effect on the pocket cameras.

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I shot a pilot all at 45 degrees. You really can't tell, especially in the dialogue scenes.

 

 

Out of interest .. what was the reason..? rather than 180..

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Out of interest .. what was the reason..? rather than 180..

We shot a bunch of lighting/action tests going for a very specific look, and myself and the director both liked the look. It also meant that I had the opportunity to really utilize a larger lighting package.

 

We tried twice to use HMIs, but they gave us nothing but problems. So the whole show, except for one scene was lit by tungsten.

 

Because of the atmosphere like rain and fog we were using, the director wanted a hyper real, almost video game like texture. We tested hard back lit rain the most, and the 45-degree shutter gave exactly what was needed.

 

When we got to the standard over/over dialogue shots, I didn't want to change the lighting techniques or camera setup so we kept everything consistent.

 

There are a few shots I wish I had more time on, but that happens every show.

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ok thanks .. so it was a specific look.. understood .. interesting the HMI,s gave you problems.. flicker I guess.. were they older models..

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With a 45 degree shutter angle and older HMI's running at 60Hz (or 50 in other countries), the problems aren't just possible flicker, but exposure because your camera when triggered might be catching just the peaks or the valleys of the sine wave of light. At 180 degrees / 24 fps, the camera capture a bit more than 2 waves / pulses, but at 45 degrees, it is less than a full wave / pulse.

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I'm glad someone posted about this. I always wondered what that effect was in Saving Private Ryan. It's also visible in the final fight scene between Kirk and Mitchell in Star Trek "Where No Man Has Gone Before."

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