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Hugo Alexandre

Nizo 561 macro + Kodak 7203 50D + BW 7266

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Nizo_561-1.jpg

 

Hello,

 

It's that time of the year again! I'll be shooting outdoors, in color.

 

I'm not sure what the Daylight/Tungsten filter setting should be.

 

1. Does the camera automatically detect that 7203 is a Daylight stock, therefore effectively pushing the 85filter out of the way?

 

2. Does the user have to set the filter switch to Tungsten to make sure the 85filter is out of the way?

 

3. Should I just always keep the filter switch set to Tungsten (light bulb), so that the 85filter remains out of the way?

 

Thank you!!!

 

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The 85 switch is operated by a pin above the gate. If the cart has no notch above the gate then it will push the 85 out. If it does have a notch then just switch it out yourself.

You mention 7266. The 85 should be out for that as well. It's just for balancing colour film- it does nothing for b/w, or nothing useful anyway.

Edited by Mark Dunn

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Yes

 

Yes

 

and yes.

 

Given the age of the camera, it is a good idea to always make sure the 85 is out of the way. Tungsten outdoors?? Use a good glass 85 screwed onto the front of the lens or correct during post. You can see it move if you look closely into the lens while actuating the filter switch.

 

sweet camera!

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The manual for this camera is confusing. For daylight balanced film and BW film, turn the indicator to "bulb" symbol.

 

A little confusing until you remember that at the time the camera was produced , most people were shooting with either Kodachrome 40 and Ektachrome 160 Super-8mm film, which was tungsten balanced , so to shoot outdoors you needed the 85-A filter in place to balance it for daylight. (sun symbol means the 85-A filter is in place).

 

But if you shot with daylight balanced film, the 85-A filter was NOT needed, so you would switch the filter setting to "bulb" (meaning that the 85-A filter is removed). With B & W you do have the option of shooting with the 85-A filter enabled , which lowers the speed (which can be handy for shooting with high speed Tri-X in bright light) and also the orange color of the 85-A filter can add contrast and help to bring out details in sky areas , which otherwise might render as flat, white areas when you are shooting B & W.

 

The reason many people will say to always leave the filter setting on bulb (85-A filter removed) is because the internal 85-A filters are quite old and may have deteriorated, which can have an impact on image quality , so when shooting with Daylight balanced film, (or B & W) use a screw-on 85-A filter in front of the lens.

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I have a 801 and have heard various reports of how the 5XX and 8XX models meter Tri-X. There's a long loooong forum about it that Tony Schilling was posting in on the filmshooting forum from ages ago but the forum is currently down so I can't look it up. It was a pages long debate about it.

 

But from my understanding, shoot Tri-X with the filter to bulb and it will read it as 160. If you put the filter in I've read it will meter at 100 but will not engage the filter as the notch isn't cut for that. Never tried it. Also confusing since you can shoot Ektachrome 100D in the Nizo and it meters fine. Tis a confusing system Kodak came up with.

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Nope. The Nizo manual specifically states that when using daylight balanced film, turn the nob to the sun symbol. I caught this error because I was giving my daughter one of my Nizo cameras and thought I should read the manual. That's why I said that the manual is confusing.

However, right on the Ektachrome D100 box, in four or five languages, it warns to NOT use the Sun symbol, but the bulb symbol.

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I think the box thing is because some cameras might engage the filter regardless of filter notch or not so then you'd have some super orange footage.

 

The Nizo metering has always confused me (yet I've managed to get good results). I've shot 100D in my Nizo 156 Macro which meters slightly different and Tri-X in that camera and my Nizo 801, always with the filter set to bulb, and gotten perfect results. The 156 filter is a physical slider to checks to see if the notch is cut, so if it isn't, the slider won't even go to Sun at all. So I've shot F100D and E100D on Bulb.

 

The manual says

Artificial light: 16-160ASA

Daylight: 10-100ASA

B&W: 10-100ASA

 

SO... then the question is, how is my Tri-X reading perfectly in my 801 with no filter notch cut and the knob on bulb? Seems like it's reading it at 160 which should be fine for 200ASA film. Seems like the manual is treating un-notched cartridges (daylight and B&W) the same. But also it does say that all film is tungsten. So how was B&W film notched back then? And how is E100D (unnotched at 100ASA) and Tri-X (unnotched at 200ASA) both exposed correctly when they seemingly shouldn't? Shouldn't the Tri-X be read as 100ASA therefore overexposing it? Or am I missing something here?

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Well Nick, I am expecting a processed roll of Ektachrome 100D in the mail on Monday, shot with my Nizo Professional. Next roll will be with my Zeiss GS8. (My two favorite Super8 cameras). The surest exposure should be with my Beaulieu, since settings are all manual.

Again, in the manual I have for the Nizo 561 (which I no longer have), on the next page (after giving the same kind of info regarding BW and tunsten balanced film on preceding page) it states for daylight balanced films to use the sun symbol. Maybe a typo that was later fixed. I bought that camera new when it just came out.

Nizo also cautions against using an external meter, since built in meter takes into account the light absorbed by lens and finder.

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Nope. The Nizo manual specifically states that when using daylight balanced film, turn the nob to the sun symbol. I caught this error because I was giving my daughter one of my Nizo cameras and thought I should read the manual. That's why I said that the manual is confusing.

However, right on the Ektachrome D100 box, in four or five languages, it warns to NOT use the Sun symbol, but the bulb symbol.

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Hi,

 

l can confirm that you do indeed need to set the filter switch to bulb to expose Tri-x properly.

 

This setting will rate it at 160ASA.

 

lve been shooting Tri-x with Nizo 481/561/801/481m/561m/801m for the past 20

years.

 

This is how you expose Tri-x correctly.

 

For Ektachrome 100D you set the filter switch to sun the colour conversion filter is removed automatically and the film is rated as 100ASA

 

Jamie

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I am trying to change my profile name to my real name- this is an account l opened in 2006!

l can’t seem to find the option to change it - any tips?

 

Thanks

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