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Luigi Castellitto

Kodak EXR 50D

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I have a roll of 16mm 400ft of Kodak EXR 50D (7245).
1) I know it has expired, but from the codes printed on the tin, how can I tell when exactly? It would also be good to know the decade, so that it can understand how many more stops it should open.
2) Can it be developed in inversion, how does someone manage with the Vision?
Thank you.

 

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I don't think you can tell the date of manufacture from the can label. Professional stocks don't have an expiry date as such because they're intended for use soon after manufacture.

You could look it up here

https://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/about/chronology_of_film/index.htm

to see when it was introduced, then assume the worst, and clip test.

Looks like 1989.

I assume you mean can you process it as reversal. Most unlikely.

Edited by Mark Dunn

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Yes, Mark, reversal, sorry for translate.

 

On Wikipedia:

 

EXR color negative (ECN-2 process 1989–1996)

5245/7245 EXR 50D introduced in 1989 (discontinued in 2006)

Should it mean that it was produced until 2006, but discontinuously? But the tin seems to me maximum of the 90s. I would not expose it to more than 3 stops (already very difficult with a 50, easier 2 stops).

Edited by Luigi Castellitto

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You can't process negative to reversal. You can process reversal to negative in some cases.

 

EXR was discontinued in 2006, but people stopped using it in the late 90's when Vision came out. The T gran was much tighter and very few films used EXR after Vision was released.

 

If the roll of film has been frozen or stored below 51 degree's fahrenheit, then it may only require 2 stops to get a decent image. If the film was not stored properly, it's most likely going to give you poor image.

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You have to clip test in order to tell the condition of the film, but 2 stops over is realistic. it will probably only suit you shooting outdoors on a sunny day. If you are shooting on an overcast cloudy day, be sure to have fast lenses. Metering it at 50asa on anything but the brightest of days will give you lots of grain.

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It also may have serious colour shifts because of the layers ageing on different rates.

I shot a similar type expired exr50 roll some years ago which came out super green and it was not possible to grade it to fully normal looking image. also had pumping grain in the shadows, maybe due to different temperatures between the sides of the roll when in storage.

 

Could surely be used for art projects though and your roll may be in usable condition if stored correctly

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My view is that, with old stock, all you save is the price of the stock. Processing and printing or scanning all cost the same. So it's just not worth shooting anything important on stock whose history you don't know.

Unless, as Aapo says, it's art.

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