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We are very pleased to announce the availability of KODAK EKTACHROME 100D Color Reversal Film 7294 in 16mm motion picture formats.

Please note that initial inventory is very limited. We will not be able to offer student discounts on this item. Order quantities will be limited for both individuals and resellers. As we gain manufacturing efficiencies during our scale-up of EKTACHROME products, we will consider discounts and larger volume purchases.
 
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Complete product details are available on our website. Our customer service reps are ready to assist you with your orders.

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Tyler Purcell said:

$240/roll for 16mm? That's 35mm pricing 😞

 

Very nearly, only $316/400'. Less running time, lots more real estate.

Now 35mm Ektachrome, projected, that would be something. You could splice up stills camera 135 bulk rolls à la Rosselini. Or just run short takes.

Edited by Mark Dunn
  • Upvote 1

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If they were a little more at home with their own products in Rochester, they might offer Ektachrome 35mm in long rolls together with some nice offers of internegative and intermediate films. For those who wish to go the traditional route dailies would be struck off an internegative after the camera original.

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Posted (edited)

......what gets my attention is that its a newly developed film that's got excellent reviews in the stills photograph......so I'm hoping to get hands-on information from learned friends out there like for example Mr Mullen who can tell us how it compares with our beloved Vision3 stocks.....I've got a tourism project coming up that I'm going to use Vision3 or this one if available in time.....saying that Cinelab London ain't touching it for example.....

Edited by Stephen Perera

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2 hours ago, Simon Wyss said:

If they were a little more at home with their own products in Rochester, they might offer Ektachrome 35mm in long rolls together with some nice offers of internegative and intermediate films. For those who wish to go the traditional route dailies would be struck off an internegative after the camera original.

Those were the days....

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Stephen Perera said:

......what gets my attention is that its a newly developed film that's got excellent reviews in the stills photograph......so I'm hoping to get hands-on information from learned friends out there like for example Mr Mullen who can tell us how it compares with our beloved Vision3 stocks.....I've got a tourism project coming up that I'm going to use Vision3 or this one if available in time.....saying that Cinelab London ain't touching it for example.....

It will have half a gnat's crotchet of exposure latitude for a start (translation: not very much, half a stop if that). Reversal was always slightly hard work. The E6 process is very expensive in chemicals too. We lost the economical VNF process years ago- it was environmentally a bit nasty and Kodak didn't care to reformulate for a stock no-one was using in any volume anymore.

High-speed analysis was probably the last holdout of professional colour reversal- that would be me at the weapons range among others. We used it by the mile and had our own VNF (and ECN) processors so the material could stay under wraps. When VNF vanished (after my time) the ranges went to neg out of desperation in the few years before high-speed video caught up.

I still have a bit of interesting stuff to run on the Steenbeck- unclassified, of course.😉

Edited by Mark Dunn

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14 hours ago, Mark Dunn said:

Very nearly, only $316/400'. Less running time, lots more real estate.

Now 35mm Ektachrome, projected, that would be something. You could splice up stills camera 135 bulk rolls à la Rosselini. Or just run short takes.

Ektachrome never had the really super saturated Kodachrome look. This new version for sure looks more like negative than Ektachrome of the past. It appears to be missing the contrast of the older stock, which is what made the older stock so nice. Where I do think it would be cool to try sometime, I don't think I'd ever project it. It's not print stock, it's not really meant for projection. I'd shoot it, scan it and then edit and lay back to film when done. 

Also, yea nobody is paying $316 for 400ft of 35mm stock. 🙂

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Hello Stephen, 

The Ektachrome is not yet available in the UK, the planned availability is the end of this month.

Thank you. 

Best regards, 

Sweatha Shanthakumar  
EI UK Sales Support - Trainee
Kodak Limited | Building 8 | Hatters Lane | Watford WD18 8PX 
GB-EI-Orders@kodak.com | 0370 8501904 Sales Support   
www.kodak.com/go/ukmotion  

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The published characteristic curve for Ektachrome 7294 must have a typo. According to the published curve, the film has an input range of only 2-3 camera stops! That can't be right. Previous releases of Ektachrome have had an input range of about 8 stops.  However, if we otherwise assume the input scale on the current publication is in log10 units (the "camera stops" title being a typo), the input range would then be 8 stops, (ie. consistent with previous Ektachrome). Previous curves for Ektachrome have had a larger difference in densities at the shoulder. Can we trust the current published curves?

Ektachrome.jpg

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You are right, that chart is faulty. Something different needed for the abscissa. Also ordinates ought to be noted as log densities.

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9 hours ago, Carl Looper said:

The published characteristic curve for Ektachrome 7294 must have a typo. According to the published curve, the film has an input range of only 2-3 camera stops! That can't be right. Previous releases of Ektachrome have had an input range of about 8 stops.  However, if we otherwise assume the input scale on the current publication is in log10 units (the "camera stops" title being a typo), the input range would then be 8 stops, (ie. consistent with previous Ektachrome). Previous curves for Ektachrome have had a larger difference in densities at the shoulder. Can we trust the current published curves?

Ektachrome.jpg

Hey Carl can you explain how to read one of these characteristics curves.....explain how we extract information on them please.....that would be great......e.g. what density means in terms of how it affects image and make it as fool proof as possible? thanks

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The graphs show how image density decreases with increasing exposure. At the left hand end of the curves are represented the darkest (densest) points of an image, we speak of the deepest shadows. At the right end are the highlights, those points that are practically colourless. The film optical density is around log 0.1 in the lightest portions. Of technical interest are how the three curves differ from each other. Everything not strictly parallel means a colour tint, for example somewhat less Blue within the midtones. Since this is subtractive colour mixing, less Blue means slightly more yellowish midtones, the typical younger Ektachrome characteristic.

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Posted (edited)

The curve provides a map between the amount of light exposing the film (horizontal axis) and the corresponding density of the processed film (vertical axis). We can say from the graph that the new Ektachrome has a dynamic range of about 9 stops. The density range of the processed film is 10.7 stops (3.22 in log10 units).

The density range is larger than the exposure range to accommodate for darkness adaption in a cinema environment.







 

Edited by Carl Looper
Clarification

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The convergence of the three curves at Dmax is still wrong though. As Carl says they should diverge there.

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On 6/7/2019 at 3:31 AM, Simon Wyss said:

Of technical interest are how the three curves differ from each other. Everything not strictly parallel means a colour tint, for example somewhat less Blue within the midtones. Since this is subtractive colour mixing, less Blue means slightly more yellowish midtones, the typical younger Ektachrome characteristic.

I believe the difference in the RGB sensitivity is to compensate for dye impurity. Reversal film can't use the orange mask method used by colour neg, but it can compensate for dye impurities through control of RGB sensitivity. Since unwanted transmissions through impure dyes decrease with an increase in dye density, you could increase the density of the impure dyes with respect to what you might otherwise do were the dyes pure - or what amounts to doing the same thing: decrease the density of the purer dyes with respect to the impurest one. Cyan is the worst offender, and yellow the least, with magenta in between. The density compensation (of yellow and magenta to match cyan) is controlled by decreasing the blue sensitivity and to a lesser extent the green sensitivity of the film, leaving red exposure (cyan density) as a reference. The result is not as good as the neg/print method, but it would be the best achievable given the reversal method.

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Correction.

In my last post I said:

Since unwanted transmissions through impure dyes decrease with an increase in dye density, you could increase the density of the impure dyes with respect to what you might otherwise do were the dyes pure - or what amounts to doing the same thing: decrease the density of the purer dyes with respect to the impurest one.

It should read:

Since unwanted transmissions through impure dyes increase with an increase in dye density, you want to decrease the density of the impure dyes with respect to what you might otherwise do were the dyes pure - or what amounts to doing the same thing: increase the density of the purer dyes with respect to the impurest one.

 

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21 hours ago, Mark Dunn said:

The convergence of the three curves at Dmax is still wrong though. As Carl says they should diverge there.

In the older Ektachrome they diverged at dmax, but that may not necessarily be the case for the newer Ektachrome. The curves may very well be correctly drawn. If they are not correctly drawn that would be a very different issue from the typo identified (log10 units vs camera stops) as it would require someone deliberately drawing those incorrect curves.

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Carl, I very much appreciate your explanations. Thank you, I have learnt something.

If I may remind of an important aspect of the discussion, let me bring in the projection light. The primary goal of a reversal film is its projection. Colour balance thus depends on the spectral characteristic of incandescent, arc discharge or, Lo and behold, the good old limelight.

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